Greeley County, Kansas

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Greeley County, Kansas
County
Greeley County, Kansas courthouse W entrance.JPG
Greeley County Courthouse in Tribune
Map of Kansas highlighting Greeley County
Location in the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.
Founded March 20, 1873
Named for Horace Greeley
Seat Tribune
Largest city Tribune
Area
 • Total 778 sq mi (2,015 km2)
 • Land 778 sq mi (2,015 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0 km2), 0.0%
Population (est.)
 • ( 2016) 1,296
 • Density 1.6/sq mi (1/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Mountain: UTC-7/ -6
Website greeleycounty.org

Greeley County (county code GL) is a county located in western Kansas, in the Central United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,247, [1] which makes it the least populous county in Kansas. Its county seat and largest city is Tribune. [2] The county is named after Horace Greeley [3] of Chappaqua, New York, editor of the New York Tribune. Greeley encouraged western settlement with the motto " Go West, young man". [4]

History

Early history

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau.

19th century

In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles. In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre.

In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state. In 1873, Greeley County was established.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 778 square miles (2,020 km2), all of which is land. [5] It is the largest of five United States counties and twelve (Virginia) independent cities that officially have no water area.[ citation needed]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 1,264
1900 493 −61.0%
1910 1,335 170.8%
1920 1,028 −23.0%
1930 1,712 66.5%
1940 1,638 −4.3%
1950 2,010 22.7%
1960 2,087 3.8%
1970 1,819 −12.8%
1980 1,845 1.4%
1990 1,774 −3.8%
2000 1,534 −13.5%
2010 1,247 −18.7%
Est. 2016 1,296 [6] 3.9%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2016 [1]

As of the 2000 census, [11] there were 1,534 people, 602 households, and 414 families residing in the county. The population density was 2 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 712 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.09% White, 0.26% Native American, 0.20% Black or African American, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 0.07% Asian, 5.22% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.54% of the population.

There were 602 households out of which 34.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.10% were married couples living together, 4.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.20% were non-families. 28.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.20% under the age of 18, 6.80% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 19.90% from 45 to 64, and 17.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 98.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,605, and the median income for a family was $45,625. Males had a median income of $29,018 versus $18,984 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,974. About 8.20% of families and 11.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.20% of those under age 18 and 6.80% of those age 65 or over.

Law and government

Presidential Elections Results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 82.2% 534 12.8% 83 5.1% 33
2012 81.0% 543 16.9% 113 2.1% 14
2008 79.3% 591 20.3% 151 0.4% 3
2004 79.5% 584 18.8% 138 1.8% 13
2000 78.2% 628 17.8% 143 4.0% 32
1996 72.0% 567 20.4% 161 7.6% 60
1992 57.7% 504 21.9% 191 20.4% 178
1988 59.3% 506 37.2% 317 3.5% 30
1984 73.3% 699 23.8% 227 2.9% 28
1980 63.4% 600 24.8% 235 11.8% 112
1976 43.4% 389 53.5% 479 3.1% 28
1972 68.5% 639 22.7% 212 8.8% 82
1968 59.9% 465 29.2% 227 10.9% 85
1964 44.8% 388 54.2% 469 1.0% 9
1960 70.6% 645 28.7% 262 0.8% 7
1956 77.1% 599 22.4% 174 0.5% 4
1952 79.1% 725 19.7% 181 1.2% 11
1948 53.3% 391 44.5% 326 2.2% 16
1944 63.0% 378 35.8% 215 1.2% 7
1940 64.6% 497 34.8% 268 0.7% 5
1936 50.5% 396 49.4% 388 0.1% 1
1932 42.6% 359 52.3% 440 5.1% 43
1928 78.3% 439 21.6% 121 0.2% 1
1924 64.2% 357 13.5% 75 22.3% 124
1920 69.5% 273 23.7% 93 6.9% 27
1916 43.6% 210 34.9% 168 21.6% 104
1912 35.6% 95 12.4% 33 52.1% 139 [a]
1908 64.6% 206 27.9% 89 7.5% 24
1904 85.6% 149 8.1% 14 6.3% 11
1900 75.6% 118 23.1% 36 1.3% 2
1896 60.8% 121 38.2% 76 1.0% 2
1892 67.9% 241 32.1% 114
1888 59.0% 422 25.2% 180 15.8% 113

The Kansas Constitution was amended in 1986 to allow the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with the approval of voters. Greeley County remained a prohibition, or "dry", county until 2008, when voters approved to allow sales of liquor by the drink. [13]

As of January 1, 2009, Greeley County and the City of Tribune have operated as a unified government. [14] The resulting government consists of a five-member commission with two members elected by city residents, two by rural residents, and one at-large. [15] Similar to Wyandotte County, the only other consolidated city-county in the state, part of the county was not included: Horace decided against consolidation. [16]

Education

Unified school districts

Communities

2005 KDOT Map of Greeley County ( map legend)

Cities

Unincorporated community

Townships

Greeley County was previously divided into three townships. However, in 1992, Colony Township and Harrison Township were merged into Tribune Township, leaving only one township for the county. This was not reported to the U.S. census until 2006, thus the 2000 census did not reflect the merger, but the 2010 census did. [17]

None of the cities within the county are considered governmentally independent, and all figures for the townships include those of the cities. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size.

Township FIPS Population
center
Population Population
density
/km² (/sq mi)
Land area
km² (sq mi)
Water area
km² (sq mi)
Water % Geographic coordinates
Colony 14975 172 0 (0) 919 (355) 0 (0) 0% 38°28′10″N 101°55′42″W / 38.46944°N 101.92833°W / 38.46944; -101.92833
Harrison 30325 107 0 (1) 511 (197) 0 (0) 0% 38°21′25″N 101°41′14″W / 38.35694°N 101.68722°W / 38.35694; -101.68722
Tribune 71475 Tribune 1,255 2 (6) 586 (226) 0 (0) 0% 38°31′51″N 101°44′36″W / 38.53083°N 101.74333°W / 38.53083; -101.74333
Sources: "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. Archived from the original on 2002-08-02. 

GREELEY COUNTY KANSAS INFORMATION

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