List of antbird genera Information

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The antbirds are a large family, Thamnophilidae, of smallish passerine bird species of subtropical and tropical Central and South America. The family has more than 230 species divided into 62 genera and includes the antshrikes, antwrens, antvireos, fire-eyes, bare-eyes and bushbirds. The most closely related species to the antbirds are the gnateaters (family Conopophagidae) and the crescentchests (family Melanopareiidae). [1]

List and classification of genera

The list of genera below follows the World Bird List maintained by Frank Gill and David Donsker on behalf of the International Ornithologists' Union. [2] The division of the genera into subfamilies and tribes follows the phylogeny published by Jan Ohlson and colleagues in 2013 as well as the list maintained by Joseph del Hoyo on the Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive website. [1] [3] For more detail, see list of antbird species.

Subfamily Euchrepomidinae

Subfamily Myrmornithinae

Subfamily Thamnophilinae

Tribe Microrhopiini

Tribe Formicivorini

Tribe Thamnophilini

Tribe Pithyini

Tribe Pyriglenini

Phylogeny

Phylogeny based on a study of the suboscines by Michael Harvey and colleagues published in 2020. Seven genera in the antbird family were found to be paraphyletic: Clytoctantes, Drymophila, Dysithamnus, Formicivora, Herpsilochmus, Myrmotherula and Sakesphorus. [6]

Myrmornis – wing-banded antbird

Thamnistes – antshrikes (2 species)

Pygiptila – spot-winged antshrike

Euchrepomis – antwrens (4 species)

Microrhopiini

Myrmorchilus – stripe-backed antbird

Microrhopias – dot-winged antwren

Aprositornis – Yapacana antbird

Ammonastes – grey-bellied antbird

Myrmophylax – black-throated antbird

Clytoctantes alixii – recurve-billed bushbird

Neoctantes – black bushbird

Clytoctantes atrogularis – Rondônia bushbird

Epinecrophylla – stipplethroats (8 species)

Formicivorini

Terenura – antwrens (2 species)

Myrmotherula (streaked group) and Myrmochanes

Myrmotherula (grey group)

Formicivora iheringi – narrow-billed antwren

Myrmotherula fluminensis – Rio de Janeiro antwren

Myrmotherula iheringi – Ihering's antwren

Formicivora – antwrens (8 species) includes Stymphalornis

Pithyini

Phaenostictus – ocellated antbird

Pithys (2 species)

Willisornis (2 species)

Phlegopsis – bare-eyes (3 species)

Oneillornis (2 species)

Gymnopithys (3 species)

Rhegmatorhina (5 species)

Cercomacra (7 species)

Cercomacroides (6 species)

Sciaphylax (2 species)

Drymophila squamata – scaled antbird

Drymophila (10 species)

Hypocnemis – warbling-antbirds (8 species)

Pyriglenini

Poliocrania – chestnut-backed antbird

Ampelornis – grey-headed antbird

Sipia (4 species)

Myrmoderus (5 species)

Hypocnemoides (2 species)

Hylophylax (3 species)

Sclateria – silvered antbird

Myrmelastes (8 species)

Myrmeciza – white-bellied antbird

Rhopornis – slender antbird

Myrmoborus (5 species)

Gymnocichla– bare-crowned antbird

Akletos (2 species)

Hafferia (3 species)

Percnostola (2 species)

Pyriglena – fire-eyes (3 species)

Thamnophilini

Isleria – antwrens (2 species)

Xenornis – speckled antshrike

Thamnomanes – antshrikes (4 species)

Megastictus – pearly antshrike

Rhopias – star-throated antwren

Dichrozona – banded antbird

Cymbilaimus – antshrikes (2 species)

Taraba – great antshrike

Hypoedaleus – spot-backed antshrike

Batara – giant antshrike

Mackenziaena – antshrikes (2 species)

Frederickena – antshrikes (3 species)

Sakesphorus cristatus – silvery-cheeked antshrike

Biatas – white-bearded antshrike

Herpsilochmus sellowi – Caatinga antwren

Dysithamnus puncticeps – spot-crowned antvireo

Dysithamnus striaticeps – streak-crowned antvireo

Herpsilochmus – antwrens (17 species)

Dysithamnus – antvireos (6 species)

Sakesphorus – antshrikes (3 species)

Thamnophilus – antshrikes (30 species)

References

  1. ^ a b Ohlson, J.I.; Irestedt, M.; Ericson, P.G.P.; Fjeldså, J (2013). "Phylogeny and classification of the New World suboscines (Aves, Passeriformes)". Zootaxa. 3613 (1): 1–35. doi: 10.11646/zootaxa.3613.1.1. PMID  24698900.
  2. ^ Gill, Frank; Donsker, David, eds. (2018). "Antbirds". World Bird List Version 8.1. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 4 February 2018.
  3. ^ del Hoyo, Joseph (ed.). "Taxonomic structure and notes". Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  4. ^ South American Classification Committee (2007) Revive the genus Dichropogon Archived 2008-05-08 at the Wayback Machine – Accessed 8 April 2008.
  5. ^ Reassign Dichropogon to Willisornis Archived 2008-10-12 at the Wayback Machine – South American Classification Committee (2008)
  6. ^ Harvey, M.G.; Bravo, G.A.; Claramunt, S.; Cuervo, A.M.; Derryberry, G.E.; Battilana, J.; Seeholzer, G.F.; McKay, J.S.; O’Meara, B.C.; Faircloth, B.C.; Edwards, S.V.; Pérez-Emán, J.; Moyle, R.G.; Sheldon, F.H.; Aleixo, A.; Smith, B.T.; Chesser, R.T.; Silveira, L.F.; Cracraft, J.; Brumfield, R.T.; Derryberry, E.P. (2020). "The evolution of a tropical biodiversity hotspot". Science. 370 (6522): 1343–1348. doi: 10.1126/science.aaz6970. hdl: 10138/329703. PMID  33303617. S2CID  228084618.

Further reading

  • Irestedt, Martin; Fjeldså, Jon; Nylander, Johan A. A. & Ericson, Per G. P. (2004): Phylogenetic relationships of typical antbirds (Thamnophilidae) and test of incongruence based on Bayes factors. BMC Evol. Biol. 4: 23. doi: 10.1186/1471-2148-4-23 Supplementary information
  • Isler, M., P. Isler, B. Whitney, and K. Zimmer (2007). Species limits in the "Schistocichla" complex of Percnostola Antbirds (Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae). Wilson Bull. 119(1): 53–70.
  • Isler, M., P. Isler, and B. Whitney (2007). Species limits in Antbirds (Thamnophilidae): The Warbling Antbird (Hypocnemis cantator) complex. Auk 124(1): 11–28.
  • Isler, M., D. Lacerda, P. Isler, S. Hackett, K. Rosenberg, and R. Brumfield (2006). Epinecrophylla, a new genus of antwrens (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 119(4): 522-527