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This is a list of French historians limited to those with a biographical entry in either English or French Wikipedia. [a] Major chroniclers, annalists, philosophers, or other writers are included, if they have important historical output. Names are listed alphabetically by last name in each section, except for the § Middle Ages section, where they are ordered by date of birth. [1]

Introduction

History only matured as a serious academic profession in the 19th century. Before that, it was exercised as a literary pursuit by amateurs such as Voltaire, Jules Michelet, and François Guizot. The transition to an academic discipline first occurred in Germany under historian Leopold von Ranke who began offering his university seminar in history in 1833. Similar introduction of the discipline into academia in France took place in the 1860s. Historians active in France at the time such as Henri Sée [ fr] who were active at that time inherited the principles of a new academic discipline from Ranke and earlier mentors including Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges. [2]

Middle Ages

listed by date of birth:

16th and 17th centuries

listed alphabetically by last name (this, and all subsequent sections):

18th century

19th century

20th century

  • Maurice Agulhon [ fr] (1926–2014), French history of the 19th and 20th centuries [22]
  • Henri Amouroux (1920–2007), Nazi occupation of France [1]
  • Philippe Ariès (1914–1984), cultural history, with focus on the changing nature of childhood, and attitudes toward death [1] [23]
  • Jacques Berque (1910–1995), Arab world; European colonization and decolonization in the modern era [24]
  • Fernand Braudel (1902–1985), early modern Europe and the Mediterranean [25] [6]
  • Charles-Olivier Carbonell [ fr] (1930–2013); contemporary history; one of the first to consider French historiography [26]
  • Michel de Certeau (1925–1986), multidisciplinary Jesuit scholar of philosophy, religion, psychoanalysis, and history [27]
  • Véronique Chankowski (born 1971), economic and social history of the ancient Greek world
  • Roger Chartier (1945– ), books, publishing, reading; print culture and reading practices [28]
  • Pierre Chaunu (1923–2009), Latin American religious and demographic history; legacy of the French Revolution; contemporary national debates [29]
  • Louis Chevalier (1911–2001), population changes in 19th c. Paris [30] [6]
  • Alain Corbin (1936– ) Limousin; daily life, emotions, and sensory experience [31]
  • Jean Delumeau (1923–2020), early modern Europe (esp. France, Italy); Christianity as lived by the masses [32]
  • Jacques Droz [ fr] (1909–1998), German world, political philosophies, diplomacy [33] [6]
  • Georges Duby (1919–1996), social and economy of medieval France and Europe [34] [6]
  • Jean-Baptiste Duroselle (1917–1994), French diplomacy [1]
  • Marc Ferro (1924–2021), his magnum opus Histoire de France is a rare, 20th century account of all of French history written by a single historian, and not entirely in accord with his Annales school beliefs [35]
  • Michel Foucault (1926–1984), theories of the structure of power in societies; enormously innovative and influential in a wide range of studies, esp. in the area of cultural history, penology, and sexuality [36] [6]
  • Bruno Fuligni (born 1968), French history [1]
  • François Furet (1927–1997), key in leading the "exodus of French intellectuals from Marxism", his works went beyond academics to the educated public [1] [37]
  • Jacques Godechot (1907–1989), prolific writer about links between the French Revolution and other revolutions, but also counter-revolution, espionage, the press, the Army, and the south of France [38]
  • Pierre Goubert (1915–2012), 17th c. peasant life; Beauvais; demographic, economic, and social history [39]
  • Michel Kaplan (born 1946), French Byzantinist [1]
  • Jack Le Goff (1924–2014), a leader of the Annales school, and world-renowned medievalist and "mass media star" for his accessible publications and tv appearances, and a founder of historical anthropology [40] [6]
  • Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie (born 1929), French peasantry of the early modern period; long-term continuities and demographic equilibrium (histoire immobile) of the 14th-17th c. [1] [6] [41]
  • Hélène Miard-Delacroix (born 1959), Franco-German relations [42]
  • Roland Mousnier (1907–1993), prolific and influential conservative and traditionalist (against the prevailing Annalistes) interpreter of institutions, the venality of nobles, and society [43]
  • Pierre Nora (1931–?), Algeria, "national memory", and a dual career in academia and publishing, reaching a wider audience through new collections issued through Gallimard; French historiography [44]
  • Mona Ozouf (1931–?), along with § François Furet, known for their revisionist approach to the French Revolution, contrary to the accepted social interpretation (of Mathiez, Lefebvre, Soboul) [45]
  • Michelle Perrot (1928–?), prisons, labor, and women's history [46]
  • René Rémond (1918–2007), politics and religion in modern France [1] [47]
  • Daniel Roche (1935–?), did long-series archival work in social phenomena, and was the outstanding exponent of the Annales school approach to cultural history, esp. regarding the last century leading up to the Revolution. [48]
  • Henry Rousso (1954–?), a leading contemporary historian specializing in the Vichy regime [49]
  • George Rudé (1910–1993), French revolution [1]
  • Pierre de Saint Jacob [ fr](1905–1960), medieval rural history, especially of Bourgogne [50]
  • Albert Soboul (1914–1982), prolific author on the French revolution based on formidable erudition and meticulous archival work, from a controversial, Marxist point of view [1] [51]
  • Jean-Pierre Vernant (1914–2007), French, ancient Greece [1]
  • Paul Veyne (born 1930), French, ancient Greece and Rome [1]
  • Pierre Vidal-Naquet (1930–2006), French, ancient Greece, civil rights activist [1]
  • Michel Vovelle (1933–2018), social and cultural history of 18th and 19th c. France; key in the historiographical turn away from the Annales paradigm of the longue durée towards history of mentalités and microhistory [52]
  • Eugen Weber (1925–2007), modern French [1]

See also

Notes and references

Notes
  1. ^ All entries in the list are linked, and most are available in English Wikipedia. Entries which are only availabe in French Wikipedia may be accessed from the superscript '[fr]' attached to the name.
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Boyd 1999.
  2. ^ Potter 2010b, p. 564.
  3. ^ Smalley 1974, p. 131.
  4. ^ Boyd 1999, p. 809–810.
  5. ^ Michaud 2010, p. 39–61.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Prag & Tendler 2018.
  7. ^ Harvey 2010, p. 202–217.
  8. ^ Kirsop 2010, p. 218–238.
  9. ^ EB online 2022, Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges.
  10. ^ Potter 2010b, p. 564–565.
  11. ^ Daileader 2010b, p. 285–305.
  12. ^ Daileader 2010c, p. 328–343.
  13. ^ Loft 2010, p. 344–349.
  14. ^ Potter 2010, p. 361–370.
  15. ^ Davis 2010, p. 417–427.
  16. ^ Friguglietti 2010, p. 428–436.
  17. ^ Prevenier 2010, p. 486–500.
  18. ^ EB online 2022b, Ernest Renan summary.
  19. ^ Whalen 2010a, p. 527–544.
  20. ^ Potter 2010b, p. 564–572.
  21. ^ Whalen 2010b, p. 573–588.
  22. ^ McPhee 2010a, p. 1–10.
  23. ^ Hutton 2010, p. 11–22.
  24. ^ Whidden 2010, p. 23–24.
  25. ^ Dursteler 2010, p. 62–76.
  26. ^ Lukacs 1977, pp. 155–160.
  27. ^ Frijhoff 2010, p. 77–78.
  28. ^ Mason 2010, p. 93–104.
  29. ^ Stewart 2010, p. 105–111.
  30. ^ Ratcliffe 2010, p. 112–135.
  31. ^ McPhee 2010b, p. 136–143.
  32. ^ Worcester 2010, p. 144–163.
  33. ^ Tendler 2010, p. 164–179.
  34. ^ Shopkow 2010, p. 180–201.
  35. ^ Callahan 2010, p. 239–251.
  36. ^ Winders 2010, p. 252–270.
  37. ^ Cox 2010, p. 271–284.
  38. ^ Kennedy 2010, p. 306–316.
  39. ^ Collins 2010, p. 317–327.
  40. ^ Rollo-Koster 2010, p. 371–393.
  41. ^ Bowman 2010, p. 394–416.
  42. ^ "Le Prix international Reimar Lüst décerné à Hélène Miard-Delacroix". Sorbonne Université (in French). Retrieved 23 January 2023.
  43. ^ Kettering 2010, p. 437–443.
  44. ^ Holbrook 2010, p. 445–460.
  45. ^ Chisick 2010, p. 462–474.
  46. ^ Davidson 2010, p. 475–485.
  47. ^ Kalman 2010, p. 501–512.
  48. ^ Chisick 2010b, p. 513–526.
  49. ^ Frey & Flood 2010, p. 545–555.
  50. ^ Collins 2010b, p. 556–563.
  51. ^ McPhee 2010c, p. 589–598.
  52. ^ McPhee 2010d, p. 599–610.

Works cited