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Jayadeva (c. 1000 CE) was an Indian mathematician, who further developed the cyclic method ( Chakravala method) [1] that was called by Hermann Hankel "the finest thing achieved in the theory of numbers before Lagrange (18th century)". [2] He also made significant contributions to combinatorics. [3]

Jayadeva's works are lost, and he is known only from a 20-verse quotation in Udaya-divakara Sundari (c. 1073), a commentary on Bhaskara I's Laghu-bhaskariya. This means that Jayadeva must have lived sometime before 1073, [4] possibly around 1000 CE. [1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Goonatilake, Susantha (1998). Toward a Global Science: Mining Civilizational Knowledge. Indiana: Indiana University Press. pp.  127, 128. ISBN  0-253-33388-1.
  2. ^ Helaine Selin, ed. (2008). Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures. Vol. 1. Springer. p. 200.
  3. ^ B. V. Subbarayappa; S. R. N. Murthy, eds. (1988). Scientific Heritage of India. Mythic Society. p. 59.
  4. ^ K. V. Sarma (2008). "Jayadeva". In Helaine Selin (ed.). Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures. Vol. 1 (2nd ed.). Springer. p. 1153. ISBN  978-1-4020-4559-2.