Sally Morgan (artist)

From Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sally_Morgan_(artist)

Sally Morgan
Born
Sally Jane Milroy

1951 (age 69–70)
NationalityAustralian
OccupationAuthor, dramatist and artist
Children

Sally Jane Morgan (née Milroy; born 1951) is an Australian Aboriginal author, dramatist, and artist. Her works are on display in numerous private and public collections in Australia and around the world. [1]

Early life, education, and personal life

Morgan was born in Perth, Western Australia in 1951 as the eldest of five children. [2] She was raised by her mother Gladys and her maternal grandmother Daisy. Her mother, a member of the Bailgu people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia, grew up in the Parkerville Children's Home as part of the Stolen Generations. [3] [4] Her father, William, a plumber by trade, died after a long-term battle with post-war experience post-traumatic stress disorder. [2] [5] [6] Of her siblings, Jill Milroy is an academic, [3] [7] Helen Milroy is a child psychiatrist who was the first indigenous Australian to become a medical doctor, [1] [8] David is a playwright, [1] [9] and William has worked as a senior public servant. [1] [10]

As a child, Morgan became aware that she was different from other children at her school because of her non- white physical appearance, and was frequently questioned by other students about her family background. Her mother never told her that she was Aboriginal, saying instead that she was of Indian-Bangladeshi descent. She understood from her mother that her ancestors were from the Indian sub-continent. [11] But, when she was 15, she learned that she and her siblings were actually of Aboriginal descent. [12]

After finishing school, she worked as a clerk in a government department, had a period of unemployment, then obtained a job as a laboratory assistant. [2] she then attended the University of Western Australia, graduating in 1974 with a B.A. in Psychology; she followed up with post-graduate diplomas from the Western Australian Institute of Technology in Counselling Psychology, Computing, and Library Studies. [5]

She married Paul Morgan, a teacher she had met at university, in 1972; the marriage later ended in divorce. They have three children, Ambelin, Blaze, and Ezekiel Kwaymullina, all of whom have co-authored works with Morgan. [1] [5]

Author

The story of her discovery of her family's past is told in the 1987 multiple biographies My Place, which sold over half a million copies in Australia. It has also been published in Europe, Asia and the United States. It told a story that many people didn't know; of children taken from their mothers, slavery, abuse and fear because their skin was a different colour. [4]

Sally Morgan's second book, Wanamurraganya, was a biography of her grandfather. She has also collaborated with artist and illustrator Bronwyn Bancroft on children's books, including Dan's Grandpa (1996). [13]

Morgan is the director at the Centre for Indigenous History and the Arts at the University of Western Australia. She has received several awards: My Place won the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission humanitarian award in 1987, the Western Australia Week literary award for non-fiction in 1988, and the 1990 Order of Australia Book Prize. In 1993, international art historians selected Morgan's print Outback, as one of 30 paintings and sculptures for reproduction on a stamp, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Awards

  • 1987 – Human Rights Literature and Other Writing Award for My Place [14]
  • 1989 – Human Rights Literature and Other Writing Award for Wanamurraganya, the story of Jack McPhee [15]
  • 1990 – Winner, Order of Australia Book Prize [16]
  • 1993 – Joint winner Fremantle Print Award with Bevan Honey [17] [18]
  • 1998 – Notable Book, Children's Book Council
  • 2012 – Notable Book, Children's Book Council of Australia.

Bibliography

Biography

  • Sally's story (Narkaling productions, 1995) edited by Barbara Ker Wilson
  • My Place (Fremantle: Fremantle Arts Centre Press. 1999 – first published 1987) ISBN  1-86368-278-3
  • Wanamurraganya, the story of Jack McPhee (Narkaling Productions, 1990)
  • Mother and daughter: The story of Daisy and Gladys Corunna (Narkaling Productions, 1994) Edited by Barbara Ker Wilson
  • Arthur Corunna's story (Narkaling Productions, 1995) edited by Barbara Ker Wilson

Children's books

  • Little piggies (Fremantle Arts Centre Press, 1991) with Paul Morgan
  • The flying emu and other Australian stories (Viking, 1992)
  • Hurry up, Oscar! (Puffin Books, 1994) illustrated by Bettina Guthridge
  • Pet problem (Fremantle Arts Centre Press, 1994)
  • Dan's grandpa (Sandcastle, 1996) illustrated by Bronwyn Bancroft
  • In your dreams (Sandcastle Books, 1997) illustrated by Bronwyn Bancroft
  • Just a little brown dog (Fremantle Arts Centre Press, 1997) illustrated by Bronwyn Bancroft
  • "Where is Galah" (Little Hare Books, 2015)
  • Little Bird's Day (Magabala Books, 2019) illustrated by Johnny Warrkatja Malibirr

Plays

  • Cruel wild woman and David Milroy (Yirra Yaakin Noongar Theatre, 1999) performed in the 1999 Festival of Perth season.

Edited

  • Gnyung Waart Kooling Kulark (released as Going Home) (Centre for Indigenous History & the Arts, School of Indigenous Studies, University of Western Australia, 2003) co-edited with Jill Milroy and Tjalaminu Mia.
  • Echoes of the past : Sister Kate's home revisited (Centre for Indigenous History and the Arts 2002) with Tjalaminu Mia, photography by Victor France

Art collections

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Laurie, Victoria (23 October 1999). "An Interview with Sally Morgan". Fremantle Arts Centre Press. Archived from the original on 15 December 2004.
  2. ^ a b c "Biography – Sally Morgan". Indigenous Australia. Australian National University. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Gladys Milroy: author of Dingo's Tree". AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource. 4 July 2017. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  4. ^ a b http://www.abc.net.au/btn/v2/australians/morgan.htm Archived 1 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ a b c "Sally Morgan: author of My Place". AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource. 20 May 2019. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  6. ^ http://www.aboriginalartonline.com/art/sally-morgan.php Archived 6 December 2017 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Jill Milroy: illustrator of Dingo's Tree". AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource. 4 July 2017. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  8. ^ Australian Indigenous Doctors' Association (2009), Journeys into Medicine, AIDA: Sydney. P. 4. ISBN  978 0 646 52119 0.
  9. ^ "David Milroy". AustralianPlays. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  10. ^ "About us". Nuntirrpa. Archived from the original on 11 January 2019.
  11. ^ "Sally Morgan :: The Collection :: Art Gallery NSW". www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  12. ^ "Professor Sally Morgan: the importance of stories". Arts Law Centre of Australia. Retrieved 5 July 2019.
  13. ^ "Books: Dan's Grandpa". Fremantle Press. Archived from the original on 17 October 2009. Retrieved 6 October 2009.
  14. ^ "1987 Human Rights Medal and Awards". Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  15. ^ "1989 Human Rights Medal and Awards". Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  16. ^ "Authors : Sally Morgan". Fremantle Press. 2014. Archived from the original on 28 July 2014. Retrieved 25 July 2014.
  17. ^ Print Matters 30 Years of the Shell Fremantle Print Award"' Holly Story ..et al 2005 FAC ISBN  0-9757307-1-1
  18. ^ "Feels Like Silk – screenprints from the City of Fremantle Art Collection" (PDF). Fremantle.wa.gov.au. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 December 2012. Retrieved 9 November 2012.