International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Society_for_Nanoscale_Science,_Computation,_and_Engineering

The International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering (ISNSCE, pronounced like "essence" [1]) is a scientific society specializing in nanotechnology and DNA computing. It was started in 2004 by Nadrian Seeman, founder of the field of DNA nanotechnology. According to the society, its purpose is "to promote the study of the control of the arrangement of the atoms in matter, examine the principles that lead to such control, to develop tools and methods to increase such control, and to investigate the use of these principles for molecular computation, and for engineering on the finest possible scales." [2] [3]

ISNSCE sponsors two academic conferences each year: the first is Foundations of Nanoscience (FNANO), and the second is the International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Computation (DNA Computing). [2] The FNANO conference has been held in Snowbird, Utah each year in April since 2004, and focuses on molecular self-assembly of nanoscale materials and devices. [4] DNA Computing focuses on biomolecular computing and DNA nanotechnology, and has been held annually since 1995. [5] The proceedings of DNA Computing are published as part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series. [6]

Awards

ISNSCE sponsors two awards annually. The ISNSCE Nanoscience Prize recognizes research in any area of nanoscience, and has been presented at FNANO each year since 2007. The Tulip Award in DNA Computing is specific to the fields of biomolecular computing and molecular programming, and has been presented at the DNA Computing conference since 2000. ISNSCE also sponsors two student awards for papers presented at the DNA Computing conference each year. [7]

The Tulip Award was first given at the sixth DNA Computing conference, in Leiden, the Netherlands, whose botanical garden is known as the birthplace of the tulip culture in the Netherlands. [8] [9]

In April 2015, ISNCSE established the Robert Dirks Molecular Programming Prize to recognize early-career scientists for molecular programming research. The award was established in memory of Dirks, who was one of the six fatalities of the February 2015 Valhalla train crash. [10]

ISNSCE Nanoscience Prize

The following are recipients of the ISNSCE Nanoscience Prize: [11] [12]

Year Awardee Institution
2008 George M. Whitesides Harvard University
2009 Paul Alivisatos University of California, Berkeley
2010 James Fraser Stoddart Northwestern University
2011 Nadrian Seeman.jpg Nadrian Seeman New York University
2012 Cees Dekker Delft University of Technology
2013 Bartosz Grzybowski Northwestern University
2014 Makoto Fujita University of Tokyo
2015 Paul Rothemund California Institute of Technology
2016 Christoph Gerber University of Basel
2017 Angela Belcher Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2019 David Leigh University of Manchester
2020 Samuel I. Stupp Northwestern University

Tulip Award in DNA Computing

The following are recipients of the Tulip Award in DNA Computing: [9] [13]

Year Awardee Institution Rationale
2000 Erik Winfree California Institute of Technology
2001 Laura Landweber Princeton University
2002 Tom Head Binghamton University
2003 Anne Condon University of British Columbia
2004 Nadrian Seeman.jpg Nadrian C. Seeman New York University
2005 John H. Reif Duke University
2006 Paul Rothemund California Institute of Technology
2007 Natasha Jonoska University of South Florida "for her work in applications of automata and graph theory to DNA assembly"
2008 Masami Hagiya University of Tokyo "for his important contributions to biomolecular computation"
2009 Bernard Yurke Boise State University "for his important contributions to DNA nanotechnology"
2010 Milan Stojanovic Columbia University "for his important achievements in molecular computing using aptamers and ribozymes"
2011 Andrew Turberfield University of Oxford "for his continuous, often pioneering, research contributions (from the early days of DNA computing)"
2012 Luca Cardelli.jpg Luca Cardelli Microsoft Research "for his research contributions to theory and software for programming biomolecular systems... [which] has provided insight into the computational nature of biomolecular processes, in particular those of strand displacement devices, and has facilitated the design of new software tools."
2013 Hao Yan Arizona State University
Yan Liu Arizona State University
2014 David Soloveichik University of California, San Francisco
2015 Lila Kari University of Western Ontario
2016 Friedrich Simmel Technical University of Munich "for his contributions in advancing DNA-based networks and self-organization of DNA-based systems"
2017 Peng Yin Harvard University "for his pioneering work developing the foundations and applications of programmable nucleic acid nanotechnology"
2018 William Shih Harvard University "for his innovative self-assembling DNA nanostructures and tools for advancing molecular biophysics and therapeutics"
2019 Lulu Qian California Institute of Technology "for her elegant and beautiful approaches to programmable DNA origami tile self-assembly, and for laying the foundations for scalable DNA neural networks"
2020 Niles Pierce [14] California Institute of Technology

See also

References

  1. ^ "Erik Winfree Homepage". Winfree Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 9 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  2. ^ a b "About ISNSCE". International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  3. ^ "History". International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  4. ^ "Overview". Duke University. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  5. ^ "International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming". International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  6. ^ "Published proceedings". International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  7. ^ "ISNCSE Awards". International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  8. ^ "DNA6: Sixth International Meeting on DNA Based Computers". Leiden Center for Natural Computing. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)[ permanent dead link]
  9. ^ a b "List of Award Winners". International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  10. ^ "Robert Dirks '00 memorial prize announced". Wabash College. 1 May 2015. Retrieved 5 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  11. ^ "The Nanoscience Prize". International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  12. ^ "FNANO20 Nano Award". Duke University. Retrieved 2019-10-30.
  13. ^ "The Tulip Award in DNA Computing". International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering. Retrieved 4 February 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter ( link)
  14. ^ "26th International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming". Institute of Physics. Retrieved 2020-09-15.

External links