Frontiers of Science

From Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frontiers_of_Science

Frontiers of Science was as illustrated comic strip created by Professor Stuart Butler of the School of Physics at the University of Sydney in collaboration with Robert Raymond, a documentary maker from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) in 1961. [1] The artist was Andrea Bresciani. [2] After 1970 the comic was illustrated by David Emerson. [3]

It explained scientific concepts and recent research and in a 3 or 4 panel illustrated strip in an accessible and easily comprehensible way. The strip was syndicated to over 200 newspapers around the world for 25 years, from 1961 to 1987. [4] It was also published as soft cover books. As of 2011, it "retains the record of being the longest-running newspaper science comic strip in the world." [5]

The strips are archived at Rare Books and Special Collections in Fisher Library at the University of Sydney. The entire series is available for viewing online. [6] [7]

Strip sample from late 1960s illustrating ocean exploration with the future Ben Franklin (PX-15)

References

  1. ^ Australian Academy of Science Archived 2008-07-22 at the Wayback Machine Biographical Memoirs - Stuart Thomas Butler 1926-1982 . Accessed March 2008.
  2. ^ Andrea Bresciani Archived 2007-11-03 at the Wayback Machine An Artist between Two Worlds By Giuseppe Trovato. Accessed March 2008.
  3. ^ Holtz, Allan (2015). "Stripper's Guide: Obscurity of the Day: Frontiers of Science". Stripper's Guide. Retrieved 2019-04-26.
  4. ^ Leach, Joan; Burns, Maureen (2009). "Frontiers of Science Communication | Issues Magazine". www.issuesmagazine.com.au. Retrieved 2019-04-26.
  5. ^ Burns, Maureen; Leach, Joan (2011-09-01). "Science as an extra dividend: Frontiers of Science". International Journal of Cultural Studies. 14 (5): 531–546. doi: 10.1177/1367877910382190. ISSN  1367-8779.
  6. ^ "Frontiers of Science". The University of Sydney. 2019.
  7. ^ Slezak, Michael (2009-10-28). "When science took a long, light look at itself". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2019-04-26.

External links