Wise County, Texas Article

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Wise County, Texas
Wise courthouse.jpg
The Wise County Courthouse in Decatur. The Romanesque Revival structure was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.
Map of Texas highlighting Wise County
Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded1856
Named for Henry Alexander Wise
Seat Decatur
Largest cityDecatur
Area
 • Total923 sq mi (2,391 km2)
 • Land904 sq mi (2,341 km2)
 • Water18 sq mi (47 km2), 2.0%
Population
 • ( 2010)59,127
 • Density65/sq mi (25/km2)
Congressional districts 12th, 13th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/ −5
Website www.co.wise.tx.us

Wise County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 59,127. [1] Its county seat is Decatur. [2]

Wise County is part of the Dallas- Fort Worth- Arlington, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The Wise Eyes crime watch program, eventually adopted by mostly rural counties in several states, was started in 1993 by then-Sheriff Phil Ryan. [3]

History

On November 10, 1837, the Battle of the Knobs was fought in what is now Wise County between about 150 Indian warriors and 18 Republic of Texas soldiers under Lieutenant A. B. Benthuysen. Despite being heavily outnumbered, the Texas soldiers held their ground, killing or wounding an estimated 50 Indians and losing 10 of their own men. More settlers began coming into the area not long afterward, with people relocating from both the Upper South and Deep South. Wise County was not founded until 1856. It was named after Virginia Congressman Henry A. Wise, who had supported annexation of Texas by the United States. He was elected governor of Virginia in 1856. [4]

As few residents of Wise County were slaveholders, opinions were mixed at the time of the Civil War, and many people opposed secession. Unionists were persecuted in North Texas, and some were lynched. Forty-two men were murdered in the Great Hanging at Gainesville in October 1862, over the course of several days in neighboring Cooke County. This has been described as the largest act of vigilante violence in US history.

Hydraulic fracturing

In recent years, Wise County allowed an increase in hydraulic fracturing. In 2011, the Parr family and others filed a lawsuit against several energy companies, including Republic Energy, Inc. and Ryder Scott Petroleum, claiming the extracting processes have created health complications for their family and neighbors. [5] In April 2014, the Parrs won a $2.9 million award from a Dallas jury. [6]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 923 square miles (2,390 km2), of which 904 square miles (2,340 km2) is land and 18 square miles (47 km2) (2.0%) is water. [7]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18603,160
18701,450−54.1%
188016,6011,044.9%
189024,13445.4%
190027,11612.4%
191026,450−2.5%
192023,363−11.7%
193019,178−17.9%
194019,074−0.5%
195016,141−15.4%
196017,0125.4%
197019,68715.7%
198026,57535.0%
199034,67930.5%
200048,79340.7%
201059,12721.2%
Est. 201664,455 [8]9.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
1850–2010 [10] 2010–2014 [1]

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 48,793 people, 17,178 households, and 13,467 families residing in the county. The population density was 54 people per square mile (21/km²). There were 19,242 housing units at an average density of 21 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.01% White, 1.23% Black, 0.75% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 5.03% from other races, and 1.71% from two or more races. 10.76% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 17,178 households out of which 38.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.10% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.60% were non-families. 18.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.14.

A Williams Institute analysis of 2010 census data found there were about 3.4 same-sex couples per 1,000 households in the county. [12]

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.30% under the age of 18, 7.80% from 18 to 24, 30.20% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 10.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $41,933, and the median income for a family was $47,909. Males had a median income of $35,913 versus $23,434 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,729. About 7.50% of families and 9.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.30% of those under age 18 and 10.60% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Wise County, like most rural counties in Texas, votes reliably for Republican candidates in statewide and national elections.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [13]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 83.4% 20,670 13.8% 3,412 2.8% 694
2012 83.0% 17,207 15.5% 3,221 1.5% 317
2008 77.4% 15,973 21.7% 4,471 0.9% 195
2004 75.7% 15,177 23.9% 4,783 0.4% 87
2000 68.6% 11,234 29.5% 4,830 1.9% 304
1996 48.8% 6,330 39.0% 5,056 12.2% 1,582
1992 33.6% 4,555 33.0% 4,478 33.4% 4,535
1988 53.2% 6,064 46.4% 5,288 0.4% 43
1984 64.1% 6,958 35.5% 3,856 0.4% 39
1980 47.3% 4,350 50.8% 4,674 2.0% 181
1976 35.6% 2,856 64.1% 5,133 0.3% 24
1972 70.4% 4,230 29.0% 1,741 0.6% 35
1968 33.8% 1,983 47.3% 2,774 18.9% 1,107
1964 26.5% 1,386 73.5% 3,852 0.1% 3
1960 50.7% 2,562 48.9% 2,470 0.4% 19
1956 45.5% 2,058 54.0% 2,443 0.5% 23
1952 42.5% 2,309 57.4% 3,121 0.1% 4
1948 11.9% 448 81.1% 3,064 7.0% 266
1944 11.2% 444 78.3% 3,114 10.6% 421
1940 11.7% 498 88.2% 3,751 0.1% 2
1936 11.3% 348 88.6% 2,737 0.2% 5
1932 9.6% 286 90.0% 2,681 0.4% 13
1928 66.2% 2,141 33.8% 1,093
1924 14.6% 532 81.2% 2,958 4.2% 151
1920 21.3% 579 74.5% 2,031 4.2% 115
1916 10.7% 263 82.6% 2,023 6.7% 164
1912 6.8% 156 80.1% 1,842 13.2% 303

Education

The following school districts lie entirely within Wise County:

The following private educational institutions serve Wise County:

The following higher education institutions serve Wise County:

Transportation

Major highways

Airports

The following public-use airports are located in the county: [14]

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 29, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ WCMessenger.com: Wise Eyes expands its vision[ permanent dead link]
  4. ^ "Wise County, Texas". www.co.wise.tx.us. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Wise County Family Sues over Natural Gas Fracking", CBS.com, 8 March 2011
  6. ^ "Wise County pair wins $3 million jury award in drilling lawsuit". Star-Telegram (Fort Worth TX). Retrieved 11 April 2015.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  10. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  12. ^ Leonhardt, David; Quealy, Kevin (June 26, 2015), "Where Same-Sex Couples Live", The New York Times, retrieved July 6, 2015
  13. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  14. ^ "Wise County Public and Private Airports". www.tollfreeairline.com. Retrieved 5 April 2018.

External links


WISE COUNTY TEXAS Latitude and Longitude:

33°13′N 97°39′W / 33.22°N 97.65°W / 33.22; -97.65