United States presidential election in Vermont, 2000 Article

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United States presidential election in Vermont, 2000

←  1996 November 7, 2000 2004 →
  Al Gore, Vice President of the United States, official portrait 1994.jpg GeorgeWBush.jpg Ralph Nader headshot.jpg
Nominee Al Gore George W. Bush Ralph Nader
Party Democratic Republican Green
Home state Tennessee Texas Connecticut
Running mate Joe Lieberman Dick Cheney Winona LaDuke
Electoral vote 3 0 0
Popular vote 149,022 119,775 20,374
Percentage 50.63% 40.70% 6.92%

Vermont Election Results by County 2000.svg
County Results

President before election

Bill Clinton
Democratic

Elected President

George W. Bush
Republican

The 2000 United States presidential election in Vermont took place on November 7, 2000, and was part of the 2000 United States presidential election. Voters chose 3 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Vermont, in 2000, gave its 3 electoral votes to Vice President Al Gore who won the state by about 10 points over Texas Governor George W. Bush, while third-party candidate Ralph Nader took nearly 7% of the vote, his second-best showing in the country in terms of percentage of the vote after Alaska [1]. Gore's win in Vermont marked the third consecutive victory for Democrats in the Green Mountain State, and the last Republican candidate to win Vermont’s three electoral votes was Bush's father, George H.W. Bush, in 1988. This election marked the first time in the Republican Party’s history that a Republican nominee was elected without winning Vermont, and the first in the history of the Democratic Party that the Democrats carried the state with a majority of the popular vote twice in a row.

As of the 2016 presidential election, this is the last time a Republican presidential candidate received more than 40% of the vote in Vermont and where the margin of victory was in single digits. It has also been the only time since 1988 the Republicans have carried any county other than Essex – which has become a bellwether county analogous to the longtime status of neighbouring Coos County, New Hampshire.

As of the 2016 presidential election, this is the last presidential election in Vermont where a Republican candidate has been able to carry Caledonia, Orange, and Orleans counties.

Primaries

Results

United States presidential election in Vermont, 2000 [2]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Al Gore 149,022 50.63% 3
Republican George W. Bush 119,775 40.70% 0
Green/ Progressive Ralph Nader 20,374 6.92% 0
Reform Pat Buchanan 2,192 0.74% 0
Vermont Grassroots Dennis "Denny" Lane 1,044 0.35% 0
Libertarian Harry Browne 784 0.27% 0
Natural Law John Hagelin 219 0.07% 0
Liberty Union Party David McReynolds 161 0.05% 0
Constitution Howard Phillips 153 0.05% 0
Socialist Workers James Harris 70 0.02% 0
Write-in 514 0.17%
Totals 294,308 100.00% 7
Voter turnout 64% +6%

Results Breakdown

By county

County Gore Votes Bush Votes Nader Votes Others Votes
Addison 51.3% 8,936 39.9% 6,953 6.9% 1,207 1.9% 331
Bennington 51.0% 9,021 41.2% 7,284 6.3% 1,112 1.5% 260
Caledonia 43.0% 5,859 49.5% 6,746 5.7% 771 1.9% 265
Chittenden 54.4% 39,156 36.2% 26,105 8.0% 5,769 1.4% 987
Essex 39.0% 1,129 54.1% 1,564 4.6% 133 2.3% 66
Franklin 49.6% 9,514 43.7% 8,395 4.3% 823 2.4% 462
Grand Isle 50.4% 1,835 42.6% 1,550 4.8% 174 2.2% 79
Lamoille 50.5% 5,676 39.6% 4,456 7.8% 878 2.1% 236
Orange 45.6% 6,694 46.7% 6,858 6.0% 888 1.7% 255
Orleans 45.1% 5,472 47.8% 5,799 4.6% 564 2.4% 297
Rutland 47.6% 13,990 46.1% 13,546 4.6% 1,355 1.6% 471
Washington 51.4% 15,281 38.5% 11,448 8.2% 2,433 2.0% 587
Windham 52.7% 11,319 34.2% 7,358 11.5% 2,475 1.6% 339
Windsor 51.9% 15,140 40.2% 11,713 6.1% 1,792 1.7% 502

References

  1. ^ "2000 Presidential Election Statistics". Dave Leip’s Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved 2018-03-05.
  2. ^ "2000 Presidential General Election Results - Vermont" (PDF). Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. 2001. Retrieved 2009-03-14. External link in |publisher= ( help)

See also