United States presidential election in New Hampshire, 1952 Article

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United States presidential election in New Hampshire, 1952

←  1948 November 4, 1952 1956 →
  Dwight David Eisenhower, photo portrait by Bachrach, 1952.jpg AdlaiEStevenson1900-1965.jpg
Nominee Dwight D. Eisenhower Adlai Stevenson
Party Republican Democratic
Home state New York [1] Illinois
Running mate Richard Nixon John Sparkman
Electoral vote 4 0
Popular vote 166,287 106,663
Percentage 60.9% 39.1%

New Hampshire Election Results by County, 1952.svg
County Results
  Stevenson—50-60%
  Eisenhower—50-60%
  Eisenhower—60-70%
  Eisenhower—70-80%
  Eisenhower—80-90%

President before election

Harry S. Truman
Democratic

Elected President

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican

The 1952 United States presidential election in New Hampshire took place on November 4, 1952, as part of the 1952 United States presidential election, which was held throughout all contemporary 48 states. Voters chose 4 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

New Hampshire was won by the Republican nominees, General Dwight D. Eisenhower of New York and his running mate Senator Richard Nixon of California. Eisenhower and Nixon defeated the Democratic nominees, former Governor Adlai Stevenson of Illinois and his running mate Senator John Sparkman of Alabama.

Eisenhower took 60.92% of the vote to Stevenson's 39.08%, a margin of 21.84%.

Eisenhower, a war hero and moderate Republican who had pledged to maintain popular New Deal Democratic policies, had wide appeal beyond the boundaries of the traditional Republican coalition. New Hampshire had been narrowly carried by Democrat Franklin Roosevelt 3 out of 4 times, although the state narrowly reverted to the GOP in 1948. However Eisenhower's unique personal appeal brought the state decisively back into the Republican column in 1952.

Eisenhower won 9 of the state's ten counties.

Since Franklin Roosevelt won them in 1932, the counties of Hillsborough County, Strafford County, and Coos County had become reliable New Deal Democratic base counties, voting for Roosevelt all four times as well as for Harry S. Truman. However Eisenhower in 1952 won back Strafford County and Coos County for the GOP, although Stevenson won a majority in Hillsborough County, home to Manchester and Nashua, which had been a reliable Democratic bastion since voting for Democrat Al Smith in 1928.

Carroll County had long been the most Republican county in New Hampshire, voting 60% against FDR all four times and over 70% for Thomas E. Dewey in 1948. Eisenhower would receive over 80% of vote in the county in 1952.

As Eisenhower won a decisive election victory nationally, New Hampshire's results would make the state almost 11% more Republican than the national average.

Results

United States presidential election in New Hampshire, 1952 [2]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower 166,287 60.92% 4
Democratic Adlai Stevenson 106,663 39.08% 0
Totals 272,950 100.00% 4

Results by county

County Eisenhower# Eisenhower% Stevenson# Stevenson% Total votes cast [3]
Belknap 9,567 71.81% 3,755 28.19% 13,322
Carroll 7,498 82.61% 1,578 17.39% 9,076
Cheshire 11,897 63.94% 6,710 36.06% 18,607
Coös 9,975 55.97% 7,848 44.03% 17,823
Grafton 15,937 72.24% 6,124 27.76% 22,061
Hillsborough 41,263 49.68% 41,802 50.32% 83,065
Merrimack 21,824 67.92% 10,310 32.08% 32,134
Rockingham 26,280 68.58% 12,040 31.42% 38,320
Strafford 13,729 53.88% 11,753 46.12% 25,482
Sullivan 8,317 63.68% 4,743 36.32% 13,060
Totals 166,287 60.92% 106,663 39.08% 272,950

References

  1. ^ "U.S. presidential election, 1952". Facts on File. Retrieved October 24, 2013. Eisenhower, born in Texas, considered a resident of New York, and headquartered at the time in Paris, finally decided to run for the Republican nomination
  2. ^ "1952 Presidential General Election Results - New Hampshire". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved 2013-11-16.
  3. ^ Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; p. 295 ISBN  0405077114

See also