1964 United States presidential election in Arizona Article

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
United States presidential election in Arizona, 1964

←  1960 November 3, 1964 (1964-11-03) 1968 →
  Barry Goldwater photo1962.jpg Black and White 37 Lyndon Johnson 3x4.jpg
Nominee Barry Goldwater Lyndon B. Johnson
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Arizona Texas
Running mate William E. Miller Hubert Humphrey
Electoral vote 5 0
Popular vote 242,535 237,753
Percentage 50.45% 49.45%

United States presidential election in Arizona, 1964 results by county.svg
County results

President before election

Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic

President-elect

Lyndon B. Johnson
Democratic

The 1964 United States presidential election in Arizona took place on November 3, 1964, as part of the 1964 United States presidential election, which was held throughout all 50 states and D.C. Voters chose five representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

In a national landslide for incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson, Arizona was one of only six states carried by Arizona native and U.S Senator Barry Goldwater, and the only state that Goldwater won outside of the Deep South. Johnson successfully carried many Republican strongholds such as Alaska, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, North and South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming; however, he lost Arizona by 0.99% or less than 5,000 votes, the smallest margin of any state in the election. Arizona’s result was 23 percent more Republican than the country as a whole.

Key to Goldwater’s victory was Maricopa County, the state’s most populated county, which he won by over twenty-one thousand votes, enabling Goldwater to carry the state despite Johnson winning ten of fourteen counties and two of three congressional districts. This is as of the 2016 election the last occasion when Graham, Mohave and Yuma Counties have supported the Democratic candidate [1] – indeed since 2000 Graham and Mohave counties have along with Yavapai County – which has never given a Democratic majority or plurality since Truman in 1948 – been the most Republican in the entire state. [2]

Since gaining statehood in 1912, Arizona had been considered a bellwether state in elections. Indeed, the previous presidential election was the first where the state did not back the winning candidate. This election, though, marked Arizona’s turn into a firm stronghold of the Republican Party. Starting in 1952 and continuing through 1992, Arizona would vote for the Republican candidate in every presidential election (mostly by relatively large margins, unlike Goldwater’s close victory), and it was the only state during those forty years not to vote for a Democrat at least once. Bill Clinton would carry the state by a small margin in 1996, but his victory has proven to be an exception, as the state has continued supporting Republicans since.

Results

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Percentage Vice-presidential candidate Home state Electoral vote
Barry Goldwater Republican Arizona 242,535 50.45% 5 William E. Miller New York 5
Lyndon B. Johnson Democratic Texas 237,753 49.45% 0 Hubert Humphrey Minnesota 0
Eric Hass Socialist Labor Party of America New York 482 0.10% 0 Henning A. Blomen Massachusetts 0
Total 480,770 100% 5 5
Needed to win 270 270

Results by county

County Goldwater# Goldwater% Johnson# Johnson% Hass# Hass% Total votes cast
Apache 1,849 47.51% 2,042 52.47% 1 0.03% 3,892
Cochise 7,644 45.78% 9,045 54.17% 8 0.05% 16,697
Coconino 5,756 52.15% 5,270 47.75% 11 0.10% 11,037
Gila 3,713 35.24% 6,821 64.73% 3 0.03% 10,537
Graham 2,655 48.82% 2,783 51.18% 0 0.00% 5,438
Greenlee 1,132 26.45% 3,147 73.55% 0 0.00% 4,279
Maricopa 143,114 53.94% 122,042 46.00% 170 0.06% 265,326
Mohave 2,091 48.19% 2,243 51.69% 5 0.12% 4,339
Navajo 4,870 50.47% 4,770 49.44% 9 0.09% 9,649
Pima 46,955 46.36% 54,120 53.44% 203 0.20% 101,278
Pinal 6,956 41.23% 9,911 58.74% 5 0.03% 16,872
Santa Cruz 1,503 43.44% 1,955 56.50% 2 0.06% 3,460
Yavapai 7,749 57.16% 5,747 42.39% 60 0.44% 13,556
Yuma 6,548 45.44% 7,857 54.52% 5 0.03% 14,410
Totals 242,535 50.45% 237,753 49.45% 482 0.10% 480,770

References

  1. ^ Sullivan, Robert David; ‘How the Red and Blue Map Evolved Over the Past Century’; America Magazine in The National Catholic Review; June 29, 2016
  2. ^ David Leip’s Atlass of US Presidential Elections 2000 Presidential General Election Data Graphs - Arizona by County