1970 United States elections Article

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1970 United States elections
Midterm elections
Election dayNovember 3
Incumbent president Richard Nixon (Republican)
Next Congress 92nd
Senate elections
Overall controlDemocratic Hold
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
(33 seats of Class 1 + 2 special elections)
Net seat changeRepublican +1 [1]
1970 Senate election map.svg
1970 Senate election results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold
  Conservative gain   Independent gain

House elections
Overall controlDemocratic Hold
Seats contestedAll 435 voting seats
Popular vote marginDemocratic +8.7%
Net seat changeDemocratic +12
1970 House Districts.png
1970 House of Representatives election results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold

Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested37 (35 states, 2 territories)
Net seat changeDemocratic +11
1970 Gubernatorial election map.svg
1970 gubernatorial election results
Territorial races not shown

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold

The 1970 United States elections were held on November 3, and elected the members of the 92nd United States Congress. The election took place during the Vietnam War, in the middle of Republican President Richard Nixon's first term. Nixon and Vice President Spiro Agnew campaigned heavily for Republican candidates, with Nixon encouraging voters to "show their displeasure with violent dissenters by voting the Republican ticket on election day." [2] However, the Democratic Party retained its Senate majority and increased its majority in the House.

In the House of Representatives, the Democrats picked up twelve seats at the expense of the Republican Party. [3]

In the Senate, Republicans picked up two seats and James L. Buckley won election as a member of the Conservative Party of New York. As of 2016, Buckley is the most recently elected third party member of Congress, although several independents have since won election to Congress. [4]

Until 2018, this was the last midterm election cycle where a sitting President's party simultaneously made net gains in one chamber of Congress but net losses in another chamber.

See also

References

  1. ^ Republicans gained two seats in the regularly-scheduled elections but lost one seat in a special election.
  2. ^ "1970 Election, Nixon's Nominations". United Press International. Retrieved 8 October 2011.
  3. ^ "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1970" (PDF). U.S. House of Reps, Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 8 October 2011.
  4. ^ Joe Lieberman won re-election in 2006 on the Connecticut for Lieberman party line, but this transient party was created only after Lieberman lost the Democratic nomination and Lieberman served in the Senate as an independent Democrat.