United States congressional delegations from Arizona Article

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Arizona's congressional districts since 2013 [1]

These are tables of congressional delegations from Arizona to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

House of Representatives

Current Representatives

List of members of the Arizonan United States House delegation, their terms in office, district boundaries, and the district political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 9 members, with 5 Republicans, and 4 Democrats.

District Incumbent CPVI Map
Current member
(Residence)
Party Beginning of service
1st Tom O'Halleran official portrait.jpg
Tom O'Halleran
( Yavapai County)
Democratic January 3, 2017 R+2 Arizona US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Martha McSally official portrait cropped.jpg
Martha McSally
( Tucson)
Republican January 3, 2015 R+1 Arizona US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Raúl Grijalva.jpg
Raúl Grijalva
( Yuma)
Democratic January 3, 2003 D+13 Arizona US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th Paul Gosar official portrait September 2016.jpg
Paul Gosar
( Prescott)
Republican January 3, 2011 R+21 Arizona US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Andy Biggs, official portrait, 115th Congress.jpg
Andy Biggs
( Gilbert)
Republican January 3, 2017 R+15 Arizona US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
6th David Schweikert 2011-06-15.jpg
David Schweikert
( Scottsdale)
Republican January 3, 2011 R+9 Arizona US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
7th Ruben Gallego official photo.jpg
Ruben Gallego
( Phoenix)
Democratic January 3, 2015 D+23 Arizona US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
8th Debbie Lesko, official portrait, 115th Congress.jpg
Debbie Lesko
( Peoria)
Republican April 24, 2018 R+13 Arizona US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
9th Kyrsten Sinema 113th Congress.jpg
Kyrsten Sinema
( Phoenix/ Mesa)
Democratic January 3, 2013 D+4 Arizona US Congressional District 9 (since 2013).tif

1863 – 1912: 1 non-voting delegate

Congress Delegate
38th
(1863–1865)
Charles Debrille Poston (R)
39th
(1865–1867)
John Noble Goodwin (R)
40th
(1867–1869)
Coles Bashford (I)
41st
(1869–1871)
Richard Cunningham McCormick (U)
42nd
(1871–1873)
43rd
(1873–1875)
44th
(1875–1877)
Hiram Sanford Stevens (D)
45th
(1877–1879)
46th
(1879–1881)
John Goulder Campbell (D)
47th
(1881–1883)
Granville Henderson Oury (D)
48th
(1883–1885)
49th
(1885–1887)
Curtis Coe Bean (R)
50th
(1887–1889)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
51st
(1889–1891)
52nd
(1891–1893)
53rd
(1893–1895)
54th
(1895–1897)
Nathan Oakes Murphy (R)
55th
(1897–1899)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
56th
(1899–1901)
John Frank Wilson (D)
57th
(1901–1903)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
58th
(1903–1905)
John Frank Wilson (D)
59th
(1905–1907)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
60th
(1907–1909)
61st
(1909–1911)
Ralph Henry Cameron (R)
62nd
(1911–1912)

1912 – 1943: 1 seat

Congress At-large
62nd
(1912–1913)
Carl Hayden (D)
63rd
(1913–1915)
64th
(1915–1917)
65th
(1917–1919)
66th
(1919–1921)
67th
(1921–1923)
68th
(1923–1925)
69th
(1925–1927)
70th
(1927–1929)
Lewis W. Douglas (D)
71st
(1929–1931)
72nd
(1931–1933)
73rd
(1933–1935)
Isabella Selmes Greenway (D)
74th
(1935–1937)
75th
(1937–1939)
John R. Murdock (D)
76th
(1939–1941)
77th
(1941–1943)

1943 – 1963: 2 seats

After the 1940 census, a second seat was added. For six years, the seats were elected at-large statewide on a general ticket. In 1949, districts were used.

Congress Elected statewide on a General ticket
1st seat 2nd seat
78th
(1943–1945)
John R. Murdock (D) Richard F. Harless (D)
79th
(1945–1947)
80th
(1947–1949)
  Districts
1st 2nd
81st
(1949–1951)
John R. Murdock (D) Harold A. Patten (D)
82nd
(1951–1953)
83rd
(1953–1955)
John Jacob Rhodes (R)
84th
(1955–1957)
Stewart Lee Udall (D)
85th
(1957–1959)
86th
(1959–1961)
87th
(1961–1963)
Mo Udall (D)

1963 – 1973: 3 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd
88th
(1963–1965)
John Jacob Rhodes (R) Mo Udall (D) George Frederick Senner, Jr. (D)
89th
(1965–1967)
90th
(1967–1969)
Sam Steiger (R)
91st
(1969–1971)
92nd
(1971–1973)

1973 – 1983: 4 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
93rd
(1973–1975)
John Jacob Rhodes (R) Mo Udall (D) Sam Steiger (R) John Bertrand Conlan (R)
94th
(1975–1977)
95th
(1977–1979)
Bob Stump (D) Eldon D. Rudd (R)
96th
(1979–1981)
97th
(1981–1983)
Bob Stump (R)

1983 – 1993: 5 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
98th
(1983–1985)
John McCain (R) Mo Udall (D) Bob Stump (R) Eldon D. Rudd (R) James Francis McNulty, Jr. (D)
99th
(1985–1987)
Jim Kolbe (R)
100th
(1987–1989)
John Jacob Rhodes III (R) Jon Kyl (R)
101st
(1989–1991)
102nd
(1991–1993)
Ed Pastor (D)

1993 – 2003: 6 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
103rd
(1993–1995)
Samuel G. Coppersmith (D) Ed Pastor (D) Bob Stump (R) Jon Kyl (R) Jim Kolbe (R) Karan English (D)
104th
(1995–1997)
Matt Salmon (R) John B. Shadegg (R) J. D. Hayworth (R)
105th
(1997–1999)
106th
(1999–2001)
107th
(2001–2003)
Jeff Flake (R)

2003 – 2013: 8 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th
108th
(2003–2005)
Rick Renzi (R) Trent Franks (R) John B. Shadegg (R) Ed Pastor (D) J. D. Hayworth (R) Jeff Flake (R) Raúl Grijalva (D) Jim Kolbe (R)
109th
(2005–2007)
110th
(2007–2009)
Harry Mitchell (D) Gabrielle Giffords (D)
111th
(2009–2011)
Ann Kirkpatrick (D)
112th
(2011–2013)
Paul Gosar (R) Ben Quayle (R) David Schweikert (R)
Ron Barber (D)

2013 – Present: 9 seats

After the 2010 Census, Arizona gained one seat.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
113th
(2013–2015)
Ann Kirkpatrick (D) Ron Barber (D) Raúl Grijalva (D) Paul Gosar (R) Matt Salmon (R) David Schweikert (R) Ed Pastor (D) Trent Franks (R) Kyrsten Sinema (D)
114th
(2015–2017)
Martha McSally (R) Ruben Gallego (D)
115th
(2017–2019)
Tom O'Halleran (D) Andy Biggs (R)
Debbie Lesko (R)

United States Senate

Class 1 Congress Class 3
Henry Fountain Ashurst (D)   62nd (1912–1913)   Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917)  
  65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923)   Ralph Henry Cameron (R)
  68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)   Carl Hayden (D)
  71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935)  
  74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)  
Ernest W. McFarland (D)   77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947)  
  80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953)  
Barry Goldwater (R)   83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)  
  86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965)  
Paul Jones Fannin (R)   89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)   Barry Goldwater (R)
  92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)  
Dennis DeConcini (D)   95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983)  
  98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)   John McCain (R)
  101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)  
Jon Kyl (R)   104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)  
  107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)  
  110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013)  
Jeff Flake (R)   113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019)  

Living former senators

As of August 2018, there are two living former senators.

Senator Term of office Class Date of birth (and age)
Dennis DeConcini 1977–1995 1 (1937-05-08) May 8, 1937 (age 81)
Jon Kyl 1995–2013 1 (1942-04-25) April 25, 1942 (age 76)

Key

Key to party colors and abbreviations for members of the U.S. Congress
American (Know Nothing) (K-N)
Adams (A),
Anti-Jacksonian (Anti-J),
National Republican (NR)
Anti-Administration (Anti-Admin)
Anti-Masonic (Anti-M)
Conservative (Con)
Democratic (D)
Dixiecrat (Dix),
States' rights (SR)
Democratic-Republican (D-R)
Farmer–Labor (FL)
Federalist (F)
Free Soil (FS)
Free Silver (FSv)
Fusion (FU)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Nonpartisan League (NPL)
Nullifier (N)
Opposition (O)
Populist (Pop)
Pro-Administration (Pro-Admin)
Progressive (Prog)
Prohibition (Proh)
Readjuster (Rea)
Republican (R)
Socialist (Soc)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
Independent,
None,
or Unaffiliated

See also

References

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2014.