Towner County, North Dakota Information (Geography)

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towner_County,_North_Dakota

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Towner County, North Dakota
Towner County Courthouse.jpg
Postcard. Towner County Courthouse in Cando, North Dakota, a historic Queen Anne-style building.
Map of North Dakota highlighting Towner County
Location within the U.S. state of North Dakota
Map of the United States highlighting North Dakota
North Dakota's location within the U.S.
FoundedMarch 8, 1883 (created)
January 24, 1884 (organized)
Named forOscar M. Towner
Seat Cando
Largest cityCando
Area
 • Total1,041 sq mi (2,696 km2)
 • Land1,025 sq mi (2,655 km2)
 • Water17 sq mi (44 km2), 1.6%
Population (est.)
 • ( 2018)2,192
 • Density2.20/sq mi (0.85/km2)
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Central: UTC−6/ −5
Website townercountynd.com

Towner County is a county in the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population is 2,246. [1] Its county seat is Cando. [2] It is south of the Canada–US border with Manitoba.

History

The Dakota Territory legislature created the county on March 8, 1883, with areas partitioned from Cavalier and Rolette counties. It was named for Oscar M. Towner (1842–1897), a businessman and member of the 15th territorial legislature. The county organization was not completed at that time, and the county was attached to Pembina County for judicial and administrative purposes. That lasted until January 24, 1884, when the county organization was effected, and its attachment to Pembina was dissolved. However, on January 26, 1889, the county was attached to Ramsey County for judicial and administrative purposes. This arrangement only lasted a few months. The boundaries of Towner County as first formed have not been altered to the present (as of 2019). [3] [4]

The city of Towner, North Dakota, is in McHenry County.

Geography

Towner County lies on the north line of North Dakota, and thus on the north line of the continental United States. Its north boundary line abuts the south boundary line of Canada. Its terrain consists of rolling hills, dotted with lakes and ponds. The area is devoted to agriculture. [5] The Laurentian Divide runs across Towner County - the northern terrain slopes to the north while the southern terrain slopes to the south, and the county as a whole slightly slopes to the east. [6] The county has a total area of 1,041 square miles (2,700 km2), of which 1,025 square miles (2,650 km2) is land and 17 square miles (44 km2) (1.6%) is water. [7]

Major highways

Adjacent counties and rural municipalities

National protected areas

Lakes [5]

  • Armourdale Lake
  • Brumba Pool
  • Lake Alice (part)
  • McLaughlin Lake
  • Moore Lake
  • Pound Lake
  • Rock Lake
  • Snyder Lake

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18901,450
19006,491347.7%
19108,96338.1%
19208,327−7.1%
19308,3930.8%
19407,200−14.2%
19506,360−11.7%
19605,624−11.6%
19704,645−17.4%
19804,052−12.8%
19903,627−10.5%
20002,876−20.7%
20102,246−21.9%
Est. 20182,192 [8]−2.4%
US Decennial Census [9]
1790-1960 [10] 1900-1990 [11]
1990-2000 [12] 2010-2018 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 2,876 people, 1,218 households, and 785 families in the county. The population density was 2.8/sqmi (1.08/km²). There were 1,558 housing units at an average density of 1.52/sqmi (0.59/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.32% White, 0.07% Black or African American, 2.05% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.03% from other races, and 0.45% from two or more races. 0.17% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 35.1% were of German and 31.0% Norwegian ancestry. 98.4% spoke English as their first language.

There were 1,218 households out of which 27.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.90% were married couples living together, 4.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.50% were non-families. 33.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.93.

The county population contained 24.60% under the age of 18, 3.60% from 18 to 24, 24.00% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 23.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 97.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,740, and the median income for a family was $39,286. Males had a median income of $24,917 versus $17,335 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,605. About 6.30% of families and 8.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.20% of those under age 18 and 8.80% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,246 people, 1,048 households, and 639 families in the county. [13] The population density was 2.19/sqmi (0.85/km²). There were 1,449 housing units at an average density of 1.41/sqmi (0.55/km²). [14] The racial makeup of the county was 96.7% white, 2.2% American Indian, 0.1% black or African American, 0.3% from other races, and 0.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.4% of the population. [13] In terms of ancestry, 46.5% were German, 41.5% were Norwegian, 10.4% were Irish, 7.4% were English, 5.5% were Swedish, and 3.2% were American. [15]

Of the 1,048 households, 22.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 39.0% were non-families, and 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.71. The median age was 50.3 years. [13]

The median income for a household in the county was $43,684 and the median income for a family was $54,609. Males had a median income of $36,350 versus $26,164 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,203. About 8.5% of families and 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.1% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over. [16]

Communities

Cities

Unincorporated communities

Townships

  • Armourdale
  • Atkins
  • Bethel
  • Cando
  • Coolin
  • Crocus
  • Dash
  • Gerrard
  • Grainfield
  • Howell
  • Lansing
  • Maza
  • Monroe
  • Mount View
  • New City
  • Olson
  • Paulson
  • Picton
  • Rock Lake
  • Sidney
  • Smith
  • Sorenson
  • Springfield
  • Teddy
  • Twin Hill
  • Victor
  • Virginia
  • Zion

Politics

Towner County voters have chosen the Republican Party candidate in 62% of the national elections since 1964 (as of 2016).

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results [18]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 63.4% 733 26.4% 305 10.3% 119
2012 52.7% 623 43.7% 516 3.6% 43
2008 44.8% 536 51.9% 621 3.3% 40
2004 54.2% 754 43.6% 606 2.2% 31
2000 58.4% 694 34.5% 410 7.2% 85
1996 39.1% 542 46.8% 649 14.1% 196
1992 34.2% 600 42.6% 748 23.3% 409
1988 48.9% 946 50.2% 970 0.9% 18
1984 60.2% 1,242 38.2% 789 1.7% 34
1980 64.9% 1,375 26.8% 568 8.3% 176
1976 44.5% 993 54.4% 1,216 1.1% 25
1972 58.0% 1,349 40.6% 944 1.4% 32
1968 49.8% 1,109 44.5% 990 5.7% 126
1964 32.6% 788 67.4% 1,628 0.0% 1
1960 52.2% 1,410 47.8% 1,292 0.0% 1
1956 54.3% 1,391 45.6% 1,169 0.2% 4
1952 69.2% 1,960 29.8% 843 1.0% 28
1948 49.8% 1,145 47.8% 1,100 2.4% 56
1944 48.0% 1,097 51.8% 1,185 0.2% 4
1940 50.3% 1,630 49.2% 1,596 0.5% 15
1936 22.4% 720 54.3% 1,744 23.3% 750
1932 25.5% 765 73.0% 2,190 1.5% 44
1928 54.2% 1,588 45.2% 1,324 0.6% 16
1924 47.7% 1,173 9.1% 223 43.3% 1,065
1920 79.3% 2,192 17.2% 476 3.4% 95
1916 43.7% 665 50.5% 769 5.8% 88
1912 26.4% 352 39.9% 532 33.7% 450
1908 54.2% 867 40.9% 655 4.9% 78
1904 67.2% 1,022 28.6% 435 4.1% 63
1900 62.0% 805 35.0% 454 3.1% 40

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 1, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2006. Retrieved February 4, 2015.
  4. ^ "County History". North Dakota.gov. The State of North Dakota. Retrieved February 4, 2015.
  5. ^ a b Towner County ND Google Maps (accessed 21 February 2019)
  6. ^ "Find an Altitude/Towner County ND" Google Maps (accessed 21 February 2019)
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 29, 2015. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  9. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (April 20, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 1, 2015.
  13. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  15. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  16. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  17. ^ 2007 Taxable Valuation Survey Archived February 13, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, North Dakota League of Cities
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 13, 2018.

External links


TOWNER COUNTY NORTH DAKOTA Latitude and Longitude:

48°41′N 99°15′W / 48.69°N 99.25°W / 48.69; -99.25