Tennessee Technological University Article

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Tennessee Technological University
Tennessee Technological University seal.svg
Type State university
Established1915
Endowment$65.9 million [1]
PresidentPhilip B. Oldham
Academic staff
550 (approx.) [1]
Students10,504 (Fall 2017) [2]
Undergraduates9,365 (Fall 2017) [2]
Postgraduates1,139 (Fall 2017) [2]
Location Cookeville, Tennessee, United States
36°10′35″N 85°30′35″W / 36.17639°N 85.50972°W / 36.17639; -85.50972
TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY Latitude and Longitude:

36°10′35″N 85°30′35″W / 36.17639°N 85.50972°W / 36.17639; -85.50972
Campus Suburban, 235 acres (95 ha) [3] [4]
ColorsPurple and Gold [7]
         
Athletics NCAA Division I
Ohio Valley Conference [5] [6]
Nickname Golden Eagles
MascotAwesome Eagle [8]
Website www.tntech.edu
Tennessee Technological University logo.svg

Tennessee Technological University, popularly known as Tennessee Tech, is an accredited public university located in Cookeville, Tennessee, United States, a city approximately 80 miles (129 km) east of Nashville. It was formerly known as Tennessee Polytechnic Institute (1915), and before that as University of Dixie, the name under which it was founded as a private institution in 1909. [3] [4] Tennessee Tech places special emphasis on undergraduate education in fields related to engineering and technology, although degrees in education, liberal arts, agriculture, nursing, and other fields of study can be pursued as well. [9] Additionally, there are graduate offerings in engineering, education, business, and the liberal arts. Affiliated with the Tennessee Board of Regents, the university is governed by a Board of Trustees. [10] Its athletic teams compete in the Ohio Valley Conference. [6]

As of the 2018 fall semester, Tennessee Tech enrolls more than 10,000 students (9,006 undergraduate and 1,180 graduate students), [2] and its campus has 87 buildings on 235 acres (95 ha) centered along Dixie Avenue in northern Cookeville. [3] [4] The average class size is 26 students, and the student to faculty ratio is 18:1. [1] Fewer than one percent of all classes are taught by teaching assistants, with the rest of the classes being taught by professors. The ethnic breakdown of the student population is: 84% White/Caucasian, 4% African American, 3% Hispanic, 2% Asian/Pacific Islander, 4% non-resident alien, and 4% other. [6]

History

Tennessee Tech is rooted in the University of Dixie (popularly known as Dixie College), which was chartered in 1909 and began operations in 1912. It struggled with funding and enrollment, however, and the campus was deeded to local governments. In 1915, the state government assumed control of the campus and chartered the new school as Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. The new school included just 13 faculty members and 19 students during the 1916-17 academic year and consisted of just 18 acres of undeveloped land with one administrative building and two student dorms. [11] Due to the rural nature of the school, students also worked in the school garden to grow and prepare their own meals. In 1929, the first class graduated with four-year bachelor's degrees. [11] Tennessee Polytechnic Institute was elevated to university status in 1965, when its name changed to Tennessee Technological University. [11]

Buildings on campus

Educational or administrative

Roaden University Center.
  • Roaden University Center (RUC), often simply called the UC. Built in 1971 and named for Arliss Roaden, president of the university from 1974 to 1985, this building houses the campus information center (Campus Compass), administrative offices for the Offices of Financial Aid, Disabilities, Communications and Marketing, and Eagle Card. It also contains the university's bookstore, the Women's Center, post office, and primary dining areas. The Joan Derryberry Art Gallery and the university's student-run radio station, WTTU, are also located here. [3]
  • Bartoo Hall (BART) houses the College of Education's curriculum and instruction department, and much of its activity centers around smart classrooms and the Learning Resources Center. It is also the home of the Horace M. Jeffers Twenty-First Century Production and Teaching Laboratories. Constructed in 1916 as the men's dormitory for Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, this building was originally known simply as West Hall. It was later home to the university's biology department and is named for Dorr R. Bartoo, a former head of the biology department. [12] Bartoo is undergoing renovations as of July 2018.
  • Brown Hall (BRWN) is home to the mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering departments and the Center for Manufacturing Research. About 20 labs are located in the building for research related to these fields. It also features the DENSO Mechanical Engineering Smart Classroom. Situated on the southern side of the engineering quad, this building is named for James Seay Brown, former chairperson of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. [12]
  • Bruner Hall (BRUN) is home to the mathematics, physics, and computer science departments. Situated on the northern side of the engineering quad, this building is named for Clarence V. Bruner, dean of faculty from 1961 to 1963. [12]
Derryberry Hall clock tower.
  • Bryan Fine Arts Building (BFA) is home to the College of Fine Arts as well as the Wattenbarger Auditorium. Constructed in 1981, this building is named for Charles Faulkner Bryan, head of the Department of Music from 1936 to 1939. [12] Artwork by faculty and students is exhibited in the building, and several instruments from the Charles F. Bryan Folk Instrument Collection, including numerous Appalachian dulcimers, are on display in the lobby.
  • Clement Hall (CLEM) is home to the College of Engineering and the Department of Basic Engineering. The building is also home to the D.W. Mattson Computer Center, which includes the administrative offices and data center of the information technology services department. Situated on the eastern side of the engineering quad, Clement Hall was constructed in the mid-1960s and is named for Frank G. Clement, former governor of Tennessee (1953–1959, 1963–1967). [13] The computer center is named for Dale W. Mattson, the engineering professor who acquired the university's first computer, an IBM 650, in the 1960s. [14]
  • Derryberry Hall (DBRY) is the signature building on campus. It is home to the Offices of the President and Provost as well as the Offices of Admissions, the Bursar, Records and Registration, Institutional Research, University Development, University Advancement, Graduate Studies, and International Affairs. The building is also the home to the university's main auditorium, Derryberry Auditorium. The oldest building on campus, Derryberry was constructed in 1912 for the university's predecessor, Dixie College, though it has undergone numerous renovations since then. [12] It is named after Everett Derryberry, president of the university from 1940 to 1974. The building's iconic colonial-style clock tower is equipped with a carillon that chimes every quarter-hour and plays selected pieces at 5 p.m. and 10 p.m. daily. [3]
  • Foundation Hall (FNDH) is the location of the university police, the Small Business Development Center, and the College of Fine Arts' art education program. The building was formerly the home of Prescott Middle School. [15] The non-profit TTU Foundation purchased the building from Putnam County in 2009. [16]
Maya Angelou speaking in the Derryberry Hall Auditorium in 2012
  • Foster Hall (FOST) is home to the Department of Chemistry. Constructed in 1964, the building is named for Dr. Ferris U. Foster, a former department chairperson. [17] As of July 2018, the university is in the process of constructing a new laboratory sciences building, which will house the chemistry department when complete.
  • Foundry (FDRY) is used by the Manufacturing and Engineering Technology Department for metal casting. [12]
  • Henderson Hall (HEND) is home to the College of Arts and Sciences, the general curriculum program, and the English and history departments. Constructed in 1931, the building is named in honor of James Manson Henderson, the first director of the university's School of Engineering. [12] Henderson Hall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, primarily for its architecture. The building was designed by Benjamin F. Hunt, who worked for the firm of noted regional architect R. H. Hunt. [18]
  • Jere Whitson Hall (JWB), or Jere Whitson Memorial Building, is the home of the university's enrollment operations, including undergraduate admissions, financial aid, scholarships, records and registration, new student and family programs, the graduation office, and military and veterans' affairs. The building also houses the Backdoor Playhouse, the campus theater, on its lower level. Named for a founder of Dixie College, this building was constructed in 1949 and served as the university's library until 1989. [12]
Clement Hall in Winter.
  • Johnson Hall (JOHN) is home to the College of Business and its associated academic departments (accounting and business law; economics, finance, and marketing; decision sciences and management; and MBA studies). Constructed in 1970, the building is named after Louis Johnson, the first dean of the College of Business. Johnson Hall includes the 150-seat Don Ervin Auditorium and the Heidtke Trading Room. [12]
  • Kittrell Hall (KITT) is home to the Department of Earth Sciences. This building was constructed in 1916 as a women's dormitory for Tennessee Polytechnic Institute (Bartoo Hall, on the opposite side of the quad, was the men's dorm). Originally known simply as East Hall, the building was renamed for Tom William Kittrell, the university's bursar from 1918 to 1967. Kittrell Hall is nicknamed "Rock Lodge" for the numerous rocks and geologic formations on display in and around the building. [12] Kittrell Hall is undergoing renovations as of July 2018.
  • Lewis Hall (LEWS) is home to the Department of Manufacturing and Engineering Technology. Constructed in 1920 as an engineering and industrial arts shop, the building is named after William H. Lewis, former chairperson of the university's Department of Industrial Arts. The building is equipped with several instructional laboratories, including the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory. [12]
  • Matthews-Daniel Hall (MATT/DANL) is two connected buildings with one name. Matthews is home to the Tennessee Alcohol Safety Education Program, some faculty offices of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, some faculty offices for the Department of Counseling and Psychology, Academic Development, the Center for Assessment and Improvement, and some psychology laboratories. Daniel is the location of the Department of Sociology and Philosophy and the criminal justice program. The building is named for Charles D. Daniel, the university's first dean, and his wife, Mary Matthews Daniel. [12]
Bryan Fine Arts Center
  • Memorial Gym (MGYM) is home to the Department of Exercise Science, Physical Education and Wellness. The building includes a large gymnasium with a basketball court, two smaller intramural gymnasia, handball courts, and a swimming pool along with offices, classrooms, and apparatus rooms. [12]
  • Oakley Hall, formerly South Hall (SOUT), is home to the School of Agriculture, the School of Human Ecology, and the Department of Foreign Languages. The building was constructed in 1931 for the school's home economics department and was renovated in the early 1950s. Oakley Hall is home to the Friday Cafe, which serves meals prepared by Human Ecology students and faculty. It was renamed in 2015 in honor of Millard and J.J. Oakley. [12] [19]
  • Old Maintenance Building (OLDM) is occupied by construction contractors and serves as the headquarters for the construction of the new laboratory sciences building.
  • Pennebaker Hall (PENN) is home to the Department of Biology and the Cooperative Fisheries Unit. Constructed in 1968, the building is named in honor of Gordon B. Pennebaker, former chairperson of the department. The Paul Hollister Herbarium, located within the building, contains over 10,000 pressed plant specimens. Behind the building is a greenhouse and garden area used by biology faculty and students for academic research. Birds, snakes and other wildlife are on display on the third floor. [12]
  • Prescott Hall (PRSC) is home to the civil and environmental engineering and chemical engineering departments as well as the Center for Energy Systems Research and the Center for the Management, Utilization, and Protection of Water Resources. [12] Situated on the western side of the engineering quad, this building was constructed in the 1960s and is named in for Wallace S. Prescott, a longtime university faculty member and administrator who served as president of TTU from 1985 to 1987. [20]
  • Ray Morris Hall (RMH) is home to the Millard Oakley STEM Center, which coordinates the university's STEM outreach programs. [12] The STEM Center opened in 2010. The building and the STEM Center are both named in honor of businessmen who provided funding for the center's establishment. [21]
  • Robert & Gloria Bell Hall (BELL) is home to the Whitson-Hester School of Nursing and the J.J. Oakley Campus Health Services unit. Constructed in 2008, the building is named for Robert Bell, the university's president from 2000 to 2012, and his wife, Gloria. The building is equipped with a 60-station computer lab and patient care labs that simulate hospital settings. [12] The building was constructed on the site of Smith Quad, a complex of dormitories demolished in the early 2000s. [22]
  • Southwest Hall (SWH) houses the College of Interdisciplinary Studies and its three schools as well as the Child Development Lab. Formerly the Upper Cumberland Regional Health Facility, the university acquired this building in 2011.
  • T.J. Farr Building (FARR), home to the College of Education, the Department of Counseling and Psychology, and the university's Honors Program. The building is named for the former chairperson of the English and Education Departments. [12]
  • Angelo & Jennette Volpe Library and Media Center (LIBR), the university's library. The library's main floor consists of a learning commons (including a coffee shop), and the third floor contains the library's stacks. The library also houses Tech's iCUBE, iMakerSpace, and tutoring center. Constructed in 1989, the library is named for Angelo Volpe, who served as the university's president from 1987 to 2000, and his wife, Jennette. [12] Special collections include the donated papers of Joe L. Evins, Democratic U.S. Representative. Tennessee Tech also holds documents on the history of the Upper Cumberland region, which includes manuscripts, photographs, and archives. [23]

Residential buildings

Traditional halls

  • Browning Hall (BRNG) is a men's residence hall located along the western end of Capitol Quad. This building, which shares a breezeway with Evins Hall, was constructed in 1966 and houses the Men's Living and Learning Village along with Evins. It is named in honor of Gordon Browning, former governor of Tennessee (1937–1939, 1949–1953). [12] As of July 2018, Browning is undergoing complete renovations.
  • Cooper Hall (COOP) is a coed residence hall located along the southern end of Capitol Quad. Constructed in 1966, this building was named in honor of Prentice Cooper, who served as governor of Tennessee from 1939 to 1945. Cooper Hall shares a breezeway with Dunn Hall. [12]
  • Crawford Hall (CRAW) is a women's residence hall located at the southwestern corner of the Main Quad. Constructed in 1962, this building contains the Women's Living and Learning Village. It is named in honor of Leonard Crawford, the university's former Director of Alumni, Placement, and Field Service. [12]
  • Dunn Hall (DUNN) is a coed residence hall located along the southern end of Capitol Quad. Constructed in 1966, the hall is named in honor of Winfield Dunn, former governor of Tennessee (1971–1975). It shares a breezeway with Cooper Hall. [12]
  • Ellington Hall (ELLG) is a coed residence hall located along the northern end of Capitol Quad that shares a breezeway and the Arts and Media Living and Learning Village with Warf Hall. Constructed in 1971, it is named in honor of Buford Ellington, former governor of Tennessee (1959–1963, 1967–1971). [12]
  • Evins Hall (EVIN) is a men's residence hall located along the western end of Capitol Quad. Constructed in 1966, it is named in honor of Joe L. Evins, who served in Congress from 1947 to 1977. Evins Hall shares a breezeway and the Men's Living and Learning Village with Browning Hall. [12] As of July 2018, Evins is undergoing complete renovations.
  • Jobe Hall (JOBE) is a coed residence hall for College of Business students, located on the northern side of the Pinkerton Quad. Constructed in 1969, it is named for Elsie Jobe, the university's former Dean of Women. The building's eastern end is connected to the northern end of Murphy Hall. [12]
  • M.S. Cooper Hall (MSCP) is a coed residence hall for international students, located along the western side of the Pinkerton Quad. Constructed in 1969, it is named for Mattie Sue Cooper, a former university reference librarian. M.S. Cooper Hall shares a breezeway and the Global Living and Learning Village with Pinkerton Hall. [12]
  • Maddux Hall (MDDX) is a coed residence hall located along the eastern side of Capitol Quad. Constructed in 1966, the building is named in honor of Jared Maddux, a former lieutenant governor of Tennessee. Maddux Hall shares a breezeway and the Engineering Living and Learning Village with McCord Hall. [12]
  • McCord Hall (MCRD) is a coed residence hall located along the eastern side of Capitol Quad. Constructed in 1966, the building is named in honor of Jim Nance McCord, who served as governor of Tennessee from 1945 to 1949. It shares a breezeway and the Engineering Living and Learning Village with Maddux Hall. [12]
  • Murphy Hall (MURP) is a coed residence hall for students enrolled in the Honors Program, located along the eastern side of Pinkerton Quad. Constructed in 1969, it is named in honor of Elizabeth Swallows Murphy, the university's former Dean of Women. The northern end of Murphy Hall is connected to the eastern end of Jobe Hall. [12]
  • Pinkerton Hall (PINK) is a coed residence hall located along the western side of Pinkerton Quad. Constructed in 1969, it is named in honor of Herman and Marguerite Pinkerton, longtime university administrators. It shares a breezeway and the Global Living and Learning Village with M.S. Cooper Hall. [12]
  • Warf Hall (WARF) is a coed residence hall located along the northern side of Capitol Quad. Constructed in 1971, it is named in honor of Howard Warf, who served as the Tennessee Commissioner of Education from 1963 to 1971. Warf shares the Arts and Media Living and Learning Village and a breezeway with Ellington Hall. [12]

Suites

  • New Hall North (NEWN) is a coed residence hall located along the south side of the Pinkerton Quad. It was constructed in 2010 and houses the Environmental Living and Learning Village. [12]
  • New Hall South (NEWS) is a coed residence hall located adjacent to New Hall North at the southern end of the Pinkerton Quad. It was constructed in 2003 and contains the Service & Leadership Living and Learning Village. [12]

Tech Village

Tech Village is a complex of one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments located on the west side of campus. [12]

Maintenance buildings

  • Facilities/Business Services Building (MTNO) houses offices and storage space for the Department of Facilities. [12]
  • George and Ridley Carr Building (MTNS) houses shop space for the Department of Facilities. [12]
  • Motor Pool Garage (MTNG) houses offices and storage space for the Department of Facilities as well as garages for university-owned vehicles. [12]
  • Otis Carroll Building (CHIL) houses the university's chiller plant. [12]
  • University Police Building (UPD) houses Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). The building originally served as the campus infirmary. [12]
  • University Services Building (USVC) houses the university's heating plant, the Office of Printing Services, and telecommunications. The building was constructed in 1929. [12]
  • Warehouse (WHSE) houses offices and storage space for the Department of Facilities. [12]

Parks and open spaces

Sherlock Park with Fall foliage
  • Gerald D. Coorts Memorial Arboretum is located in the area between the buildings on the eastern side of the Main Quad and Dixie Avenue.
  • Main Quad is a large grassy lawn surrounded by trees located at the center of the Main Quadrangle. The adjacent road has been designated a greenway and is generally off-limits to vehicular traffic.
  • Sherlock Park is a partially-wooded park located west of the Engineering Quad.
  • Centennial Plaza is a partially-wooded courtyard located south of the Roaden University Center.

Off-campus units

  • Hyder-Burks Agricultural Pavilion is a 3.5-acre (0.014 km2) complex located about a mile west of the main campus on Highway 290 (Gainesboro Grade). Operated by the School of Agriculture, the pavilion includes a main show arena, sales arena, barn, and picnic shelter. Constructed in the mid-1990s, the pavilion is named for W. Clyde Hyder, a former animal sciences professor, and Tommy Burks, a former state senator. Hyder-Burks is also connected to Shipley Farm, in Cookeville, Tennessee, and Oakley Farm, in Livingston, Tennessee. [24]
  • Joe L. Evins Appalachian Center for Craft, or Craft Center, is a satellite campus of Tennessee Tech located near Smithville, Tennessee. The 87,000-square-foot (8,100 m2) facility was constructed in 1979 and is named in honor of Congressman Joe L. Evins (the nearby state park is named after Evins's father, Edgar). The Craft Center offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with concentrations in clay, fibers, glass, metals and wood and supports an artist-in-residence. [25]

Academics

Departments

Tennessee Technological University has a total of 44 bachelor's degree programs and 20 graduate programs as well as doctoral programs in the fields of education, engineering, and environmental sciences. TTU emphasizes a focus in STEM degrees but also provides infrastructure for traditional programs including liberal arts and nursing. [26]

Henderson Hall, constructed in 1931 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985
The Main Quad, with Oakley Hall on the right
  • College of Agriculture and Human Ecology
    • School of Agriculture
    • School of Human Ecology
  • College of Arts and Sciences
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Communication
    • Counseling and Psychology
    • Earth Sciences
    • English
    • Foreign Languages
    • General Education
    • History
    • Mathematics
    • Physics
    • Pre-professional Health Sciences
    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Women and Gender Studies (minor only)
  • College of Business
    • Accounting
    • Business Management
      • Business and Information Technology
      • Business Intelligence and Analytics
      • General Management
      • Human Resource Management
      • Production and Operations Management
    • Economics
    • Finance
    • Marketing
  • College of Education
    • Counseling and Psychology
    • Curriculum and Instruction
    • Physical Education
  • College of Engineering
    • Basic Engineering
    • Chemical Engineering
    • Civil and Environmental Engineering
    • Computer Science
    • Electrical and Computer Engineering
    • Manufacturing and Engineering Technology
    • Mechanical Engineering
  • College of Fine Arts
    • Art
    • Music
  • College of Graduate Studies
  • College of Interdisciplinary Studies
    • School of Environmental Studies
    • School of Interdisciplinary Studies
    • School of Professional Studies
  • Whitson-Hester School of Nursing

Programs

  • Cooperative Education
  • Educational Technology
  • Distance MBA
  • Honors
  • Military Science

Research Centers

  • Center for Energy Systems Research (CESR) is an interdisciplinary facility dedicated to research in various problems pertaining to energy and infrastructure. The facility pursues research in " solar energy, energy storage, smart grid power systems, power electronics, wind energy, distributed power plant performance improvement, cement, concrete, bridge and structure health monitoring, flood flow modeling, advanced communications, and cyber security." [27]
  • Center for Manufacturing Research (CMR) is a facility appropriated by the College of Engineering for the research in areas related to manufacturing. It has been designated as a Center of Excellence by the state of Tennessee. [28] [29]
  • Center for the Management, Utilization & Protection of Water Resources is an interdisciplinary research center that focuses its research on biodiversity, enabling technologies and tools, water security and sustainability, and the water-energy-food nexus. It has been designated as a Center of Excellence by the state of Tennessee. [30]
  • Millard Oakley STEM Center for Teaching & Learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics (STEM) actively promotes and supports quality STEM outreach programs in the Upper Cumberland region and throughout the state of Tennessee. The staff at the center work with Tech faculty across several disciplines to offer standards-aligned STEM outreach programs, promote STEM-related activities, and disseminate STEM education resources. [31]
  • Cybersecurity Education, Research, and Outreach Center (CEROC) aims to integrate university-wide existing activities and initiatives in cybersecurity education, research, and outreach. It has been designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education through 2021. [32]
  • Tennessee Cooperative Fishery Research Unit (TNCFRU) works closely with the Center for the Management, Utilization, and Protection of Water Resources to "enhance graduate education in fisheries and wildlife sciences and to facilitate research between natural resource agencies and universities on topics of mutual concern." [33]

Rankings

  • U.S. News & World Report: in Best National University listings (2017, 2018), one of the top public universities (2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016), among top regional universities in the South (2012-2016), graduates leave with the least debt in the South (2011, 2015-2018), College of Engineering is one of the Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs Rankings (Doctorate) (2016, 2017), MBA is one of the best online programs in the country (2016), among top 10 universities in the South for veterans (2015)
  • MONEY Magazine: top public college in Tennessee, 18th in public colleges in the South (2017)
  • Social Mobility Index: top university in Tennessee for stimulating economic mobility (2017)
  • Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program: top value-added public university in Tennessee (2015)
  • Payscale.com: highest return on investment for any public university in Tennessee, students have second-highest mid-career salary potential of any public university graduates in Tennessee (2017)
  • Princeton Review: among best in Southeast (2005-2014, 2016, 2017)
  • GetEducated.com: among best and most affordable AACSB-accredited online MBA programs, top school in Tennessee (2017)
  • G.I. Jobs Magazine: military-friendly (2012-2015)
  • Washington Monthly: top-ranked public university in Tennessee (2017)
  • Military Advanced Education & Transition Guide to Colleges & Universities: a top school for military- and veteran-friendly education (2016)

Athletics

Tucker Stadium and Overall Field

The Tennessee Tech athletic program is a member of the Ohio Valley Conference (OVC) and competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision. [5] [6] The school's teams are known as the Golden Eagles, the team colors are purple and gold, and the mascot is Awesome Eagle. [8] [34]

Student activities

The Main Quad in early February
The Main Quad in summer 2007
Prescott Hall
Volpe Library
Main Entrance
The Main Quad, with Bartoo Hall on the right

Honors societies

Religious organizations

Fraternities

Sororities

Chemistry

Engineering

Decision Sciences

Notable faculty

Notable alumni

Traditions

Campus lore

Eagle atop Derryberry Hall
  • Golden Eagle: The statue now atop Derryberry Hall was stolen by three students (Tom Moran, Roy Loudermilk, and Lewis Brown) from the lawn of the burned-out Monteagle Hotel in Monteagle, Tennessee, in November 1952. The three had hoped the eagle would provide the ultimate prop for the pep rally prior to the football game against then-rival MTSU. The hotel's owner, John Harton (a former state treasurer), demanded the return of the statue and initially rejected all offers to purchase it. He finally relented and sold the statue for $500 after Governor Frank G. Clement intervened. The eagle, which weighs 70 pounds (32 kg) and has a 6-foot wing span (1.8 m), was initially placed atop Jere Whitson Hall. It was moved to its current position atop Derryberry in 1961. [46]
  • "Dammit" the dog: A former university president once said "dammit" to a dog in front of a crowd, covering by saying that was the dog's name. Dammit has his own tombstone, an operable fire hydrant, on campus opposite Derryberry Hall.
  • T.J. Farr Building is one of the few buildings on campus not called Hall. It is said this is because when you say "Farr Hall" in the South, people think you're referring to something other than an academic building, namely a Fire Hall.
  • The "Blizzard" is a tradition which started in 1984, when students celebrated the first successful shot made by Tennessee Tech in a basketball game against MTSU by throwing showers of "Tech Squares" (toilet paper) into the air. Since MTSU moved to the Sun Belt Conference, the Blizzard is now performed against Austin Peay State University.

References

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  2. ^ a b c d "Selected Information for Common Data Set" (PDF). Fall 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e "About TTU | History and Traditions". Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved 2014-09-03.
  4. ^ a b c "About TTU | History". Archived from the original on 2007-08-15. Retrieved 2007-09-25.
  5. ^ a b "NCAA Tennessee Technological University". Retrieved 2014-09-03.
  6. ^ a b c d "About TTU | Facts and Figures". Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved 2014-09-03.
  7. ^ "Logos & Colors | Marketing Toolkit | Tennessee Technological University". Retrieved 2017-04-25.
  8. ^ a b "About TTU | Mascots". Retrieved September 3, 2014.
  9. ^ "About TTU | Mission and Vision". Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved September 3, 2014.
  10. ^ "Trustees". Tennessee Tech. Retrieved 2018-07-10.
  11. ^ a b c "About". www.tntech.edu.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq Campus Map, Tennessee Technological University official website. Retrieved: 5 June 2014.
  13. ^ Plaque at the entrance to Clement Hall. Accessed 5 June 2014.
  14. ^ Information Technology Service: Organization Archived 2014-07-19 at the Wayback Machine., Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved: 6 June 2014.
  15. ^ Jessica Smith, " Renovations to Begin on Former Prescott Middle School", The Oracle, 13 April 2012.
  16. ^ Bauer Askew, " Tennessee Technological University Master Plan: Update Refinement", 31 October 2013.
  17. ^ Harvey G. Neufeldt and W. Calvin Dickinson, The Search for Identity: A History of Tennessee Technological University, 1915–1985 (Memphis State University Press, 1991), p. 162.
  18. ^ Carroll Van West, Tennessee's Historic Landscapes: A Traveler's Guide (University of Tennessee Press, 1995), p. 277.
  19. ^ Tennessee Board of Regents June 2015 Quarterly Meeting Executive Summary Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine., Tennessee Board of Regents website. Accessed: 19 August 2015.
  20. ^ Laura Clemons, " Dr. Wallace Prescott, 1920-2014 Archived 2016-08-07 at the Wayback Machine.", Tennessee Technological University website, 2015.
  21. ^ Karen Lykins, " Grand Opening of Ray Morris Hall/Millard Oakley STEM Center Set for May 7 Archived 2014-06-06 at Archive.is", Tennessee Technological University web site, 9 April 2010.
  22. ^ " TTU Accepts $17.39 Million Bid for Construction of New Nursing Building", Tennessee Technological University website, 11 August 2006.
  23. ^ "TTU Archives and Special Collections".
  24. ^ " TTU's Ag Pavilion Celebrates 10th Anniversary", Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved: 6 June 2014.
  25. ^ About the Craft Center Archived 2014-04-27 at the Wayback Machine., Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved: 6 June 2014.
  26. ^ "TTU Academics". Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved September 3, 2014.
  27. ^ "TTU Research and Innovation | Center for Energy Systems Research". Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved 2014-09-03.
  28. ^ "TTU Research and Innovation | Center for Manufacturing Research". Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved September 3, 2014.
  29. ^ "Center for Manufacturing and Research | Mission". Tennessee Technological University. Retrieved 2014-09-03.
  30. ^ "TTU Water Center". Tennessee Tech. Retrieved 2018-07-11.
  31. ^ "Millard Oakley STEM Center". Tennessee Tech. Retrieved 2018-07-11.
  32. ^ "CEROC". Tennessee Tech. Retrieved 2018-07-11.
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