Talk:Delaware Article

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Delaware is not really the 1 state in the union.

Delaware can't be the 1st state in the union as there cannot be a union without two states....therefore the title of number 1 should be shared between Delaware and Pennsylvania.... Penn1delaware1 ( talk) 02:57, 9 June 2017 (UTC)

What the article actually says is that Delaware was the first state to ratify the Constitution, which is true regardless of semantic quibbling. Camerafiend ( talk) 13:19, 9 June 2017 (UTC)

Delaware was the last of the "13 original colonies" to become a state. This is from the lede, with the note separated out:

On December 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, and has since promoted itself as "The First State". Note: "The First to Ratify" would be more accurate, as the beginnings of the states themselves date back to the Declaration of Independence, celebrated July 4, 1776, when what was to become the State of Delaware was still the three lower counties of Pennsylvania with the governor in Philadelphia, and not establishing independence from that body until September 20, 1776. According to Delaware's own website, "Delaware became a state in 1776, just two months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence." (ref- pdf) Therefore Delaware was actually the last of the thirteen colonies to establish itself as a state. Additionally, the Delaware State Quarter is minted with this nickname, yet shows Caesar Rodney on horseback in commemoration of how he was the last delegate to show up to the Continental Congress for the historic vote for independence. And with regard to the original Articles of Confederation, Delaware was the 12th of the 13 states to ratify.

One of the most important roles for an encyclopedia is to present facts accurately. Individuals and organizations have their own agendas, and this often leads to information getting spun up into something that takes an appearance as a fact, yet fails to hold up when investigated. So for the case of this article, the NPOV way to present the info is to highlight how the State of Delaware promotes itself with their official motto as being "The First State", and then lay out the accurate facts of the matter that shows that it was actually the last.

And to be even more thorough, this article can present the fact that Rhode Island was the first colony to assert its independence from Great Britain.

"On May 4, 1776, Rhode Island became the first of the 13 colonies to renounce its allegiance to the British Crown..."
Quoted from Colony_of_Rhode_Island_and_Providence_Plantations#American_Revolutionary_period

Stamping bogus info onto a million license plates does not make it accurate. It is clear to me that Delaware's claim to being the "first state" has absolutely no validity. It was the first state to ratify the current constitution. But the country existed before that document. And so did the states that comprised the country.-- Tdadamemd sioz ( talk) 01:40, 28 July 2017 (UTC)

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Topography has Typo

When it says Delaware is a “plain”the correct spelling would be “plane”. Damelon ( talk) 21:46, 25 September 2017 (UTC)

Not done No, actually. Delaware is on a plain, not a plane. General Ization Talk 22:09, 25 September 2017 (UTC)

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Semi-protected edit request on 24 December 2017

Change the geography section to:

Not done: please establish a consensus for this alteration before using the {{ edit semi-protected}} template. This is a serious change to a rather decent chunk of the article. Upsidedown Keyboard ( talk) 02:38, 24 December 2017 (UTC)

Geography

Map of Delaware
The Twelve-Mile Circle
Diagram of the Twelve-Mile Circle, the Mason–Dixon line and " The Wedge". All blue and white areas are inside Delaware.

Delaware is 96 miles (154 km) long and ranges from 9 miles (14 km) to 35 miles (56 km) across, totaling 1,954 square miles (5,060 km2), making it the second-smallest state in the United States, after Rhode Island. Delaware is bounded to the north by Pennsylvania; to the east by the Delaware River, Delaware Bay, New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean; and to the west and south by Maryland. Small portions of Delaware are also situated on the eastern side of the Delaware River sharing land boundaries with New Jersey. The state of Delaware, together with the Eastern Shore counties of Maryland and two counties of Virginia, form the Delmarva Peninsula, which stretches down the Mid-Atlantic Coast.

The definition of the northern boundary of the state is unusual. Most of the boundary between Delaware and Pennsylvania was originally defined by an arc extending 12 miles (19.3 km) from the cupola of the courthouse in the city of New Castle.[ citation needed] This boundary is often referred to as the Twelve-Mile Circle. [a] This is the only nominally circular [nb 1] state boundary in the United States.[ citation needed]

This border extends all the way east to the low-tide mark on the New Jersey shore, then continues south along the shoreline until it again reaches the 12-mile (19 km) arc in the south; then the boundary continues in a more conventional way in the middle of the main channel ( thalweg) of the Delaware River. To the west, a portion of the arc extends past the easternmost edge of Maryland. The remaining western border runs slightly east of due south from its intersection with the arc. The Wedge of land between the northwest part of the arc and the Maryland border was claimed by both Delaware and Pennsylvania until 1921, when Delaware's claim was confirmed.

Topography

Delaware is on a level plain, with the lowest mean elevation of any state in the nation. [1] Its highest elevation, located at Ebright Azimuth, near Concord High School, is less than 450 feet (140 m) above sea level. [1] The northernmost part of the state is part of the Piedmont Plateau with hills and rolling surfaces. The Atlantic Seaboard fall line approximately follows the Robert Kirkwood Highway between Newark and Wilmington; south of this road is the Atlantic Coastal Plain with flat, sandy, and, in some parts, swampy ground. [2] A ridge about 75 to 80 feet (23 to 24 m) in elevation extends along the western boundary of the state and separates the watersheds that feed Delaware River and Bay to the east and the Chesapeake Bay to the west.

Climate

Since almost all of Delaware is a part of the Atlantic coastal plain, the effects of the ocean moderate its climate. The state lies in the humid subtropical climate zone. Despite its small size (roughly 100 miles (160 km) from its northernmost to southernmost points), there is significant variation in mean temperature and amount of snowfall between Sussex County and New Castle County. Moderated by the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay, the southern portion of the state has a milder climate and a longer growing season than the northern portion of the state. Delaware's all-time record high of 110 °F (43 °C) was recorded at Millsboro on July 21, 1930. Its all-time record low of −17 °F (−27 °C) was also recorded at Millsboro on January 17, 1893.

The Blackbird Pond on the Blackbird State Forest Meadows Tract in New Castle County, Delaware
A field north of Fox Den Rd., along the Lenape Trail in Middle Run Valley Natural Area.
Sunset in Woodbrook, New Castle County, Delaware

Environment

The transitional climate of Delaware supports a wide variety of vegetation. In the northern third of the state are found Northeastern coastal forests and mixed oak forests typical of the northeastern United States. [3] In the southern two-thirds of the state are found Middle Atlantic coastal forests. [3] Trap Pond State Park, along with areas in other parts of Sussex County, for example, support the northernmost stands of bald cypress trees in North America.

Environmental management

Delaware provides government subsidy support for the clean-up of property "lightly contaminated" by hazardous waste, the proceeds for which come from a tax on wholesale petroleum sales. [4]

. I think that "doesn't quite reach" sounds unprofessional and that there should be a note because otherwise, it wouldn't be obvious to mainly readers why the word "nominally" is necessary. 2601:2C1:C280:3EE0:C0C6:BDB5:EC1E:3799 ( talk) 01:45, 24 December 2017 (UTC)


Cite error: There are <ref group=lower-alpha> tags or {{efn}} templates on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist|group=lower-alpha}} template or {{notelist}} template (see the help page).
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  1. ^ a b "Extreme and Mean Elevations by State and Other Area" (PDF). Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2004–2005. United States Census Bureau. p. 216. Retrieved March 16, 2011.
  2. ^ "A Summary of the Geologic History of Delaware". The Delaware Geological Survey.
  3. ^ a b Olson; D. M; E. Dinerstein; et al. (2001). "Terrestrial Ecoregions of the World: A New Map of Life on Earth". BioScience. 51 (11): 933–938. doi: 10.1641/0006-3568(2001)051[0933:TEOTWA]2.0.CO;2. ISSN  0006-3568. Archived from the original on October 14, 2011.
  4. ^ Montgomery, Jeff (May 14, 2011). "Cleaning up contamination". The News Journal. New Castle, Delaware: Gannett. DelawareOnline. Archived from the original on May 14, 2011. Retrieved May 14, 2011. The first online page is archived; the page containing information related here is not in the archived version.