Stone County, Missouri Article

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STONE COUNTY MISSOURI Latitude and Longitude:

36°44′N 93°28′W / 36.74°N 93.47°W / 36.74; -93.47

Stone County, Missouri
Stone County MO Courthouse 20151021-050.jpg
Stone County Courthouse in Galena
Map of Missouri highlighting Stone County
Location in the U.S. state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 10, 1851
Named forWilliam Stone, English pioneer and an early settler in Maryland
Seat Galena
Largest city Kimberling City
Area
 • Total511 sq mi (1,323 km2)
 • Land464 sq mi (1,202 km2)
 • Water47 sq mi (122 km2), 9.2%
Population (est.)
 • ( 2015)30,943
 • Density69/sq mi (27/km2)
Congressional district 7th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/ −5
Website www.stoneco-mo.us

Stone County is a county located in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 32,202. [1] Its county seat is Galena. [2] The county was officially organized on February 10, 1851, and is named after William Stone, an English pioneer and an early settler in Maryland who also served as Taney County Judge. [3]

Stone County is part of the Branson, MO Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Springfield-Branson, MO Combined Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 511 square miles (1,320 km2), of which 464 square miles (1,200 km2) is land and 47 square miles (120 km2) (9.2%) is water. [4]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18602,400
18703,25335.5%
18804,40435.4%
18907,09061.0%
19009,89239.5%
191011,55916.9%
192011,9413.3%
193011,614−2.7%
194011,298−2.7%
19509,748−13.7%
19608,176−16.1%
19709,92121.3%
198015,58757.1%
199019,07822.4%
200028,65850.2%
201032,20212.4%
Est. 201631,047 [5]−3.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790-1960 [7] 1900-1990 [8]
1990-2000 [9] 2010-2015 [1]

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 28,658 people, 11,822 households, and 8,842 families residing in the county. The population density was 62 people per square mile (24/km²). There were 16,241 housing units at an average density of 35 per square mile (14/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.64% White, 0.07% Black or African American, 0.61% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. Approximately 1.04% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Among the major first ancestries reported in Stone County were 24.3% American, 20.4% German, 11.3% English, and 10.8% Irish ancestry.

There were 11,822 households out of which 25.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.70% were married couples living together, 7.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.20% were non-families. 21.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.76.

In the county, the population was spread out with 21.40% under the age of 18, 6.20% from 18 to 24, 23.80% from 25 to 44, 29.70% from 45 to 64, and 18.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,487, and the median income for a family was $46,675. Males had a median income of $26,224 versus $19,190 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,813. About 8.50% of families and 12.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.00% of those under age 18 and 8.10% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Of adults 25 years of age and older in Stone County, 80.4% possesses a high school diploma or higher while 14.2% holds a bachelor's degree or higher as their highest educational attainment.

Public schools

Private schools

Alternative and vocational schools

  • Tri-Lakes Special Education Cooperative - Blue Eye - (K-12) - Special Education
  • Gibson Technical Center - Reeds Spring - (09-12) - Vocational/Technical
  • New Horizons Alternative School - Reeds Spring - (06-12) - Alternative/Other

Public libraries

  • Blue Eye Public Library
  • Crane Public Library
  • Galena Public Library
  • Kimberling Area Library

Politics and government

Government

Stone County is a third-class county located in Southwest Missouri. The county's government includes a 3-person County Commission (Presiding Commissioner, Northern District Commissioner, Southern District Commissioner), several elected officials, and a Road Commission consisting of the 3 County Commissioners as well as a Northern Road Commissioner and a Southern Road Commissioner. The County Commission also oversees the Planning and Zoning Department, Senior Citizens' Services Board, a Law Enforcement Restitution Board, and neighborhood improvement districts. All elected Officials in Stone County serve 4 year terms. [11]The county employed 170 full-time employees (including elected officials) and 10 part-time employees on December 31, 2014. [12]

The Government primarily operates out of the County Seat of Galena, Missouri. The offices of the County Commission, County Clerk, Collector of Revenue, Recorder of Deeds, Treasurer as well as the University of Missouri Extension Office all operate out of the Historic Courthouse in the center of the square. The Stone County Sheriff's office, Judiciary, Circuit Clerk, and Jail are all in the Stone County Judicial Center on the east side of the square. The Assessor and Planning and Zoning offices are located in buildings on the south side of the square.

The Republican Party completely controls politics at the local level in Stone County. All current office holders are members of the Republican Party. Elected Officials in Stone County on average have a long tenure once elected to office.

Office Office Holder Since Party
Assessor Brad Hudson 2009 Republican
Circuit Clerk Deborah Scobee 2011 Republican
County Clerk Cindy Elmore 2015 Republican
Collector of Revenue Vicky A. May 2001 Republican
Coroner John Cunnygham 2017 Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Matt Selby 2000 Republican
Public Administrator Glenda (Wendy) Metcalf 1991 Republican
Recorder of Deeds Amy Jo Larson 2007 Republican
Sheriff Doug Rader 2013 Republican
Surveyor Rick Kemp 2009 Republican
Treasurer Kristi Stephens 2000 Republican
Presiding Commissioner Dennis Wood 2009 (Appointed) 2011 (Elected) Republican
Northern Commissioner Mark W. Maples 2013 Republican
Southern Commissioner Hank Smythe 2017 Republican
Northern Road Commissioner James Gold 2005 (Appointed) 2007 (Elected) Republican
Southern Road Commissioner Randy Rogers 2016 (Appointed) 2017 (elected) Republican
Circuit Court Judge Jack Goodman 2013 Republican
Associate Circuit Court Judge Division I Alan Blankenship 2003 Republican
Associate Circuit Court Judge Division II Mark Stephens 2009 Republican

State

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 72.28% 11,920 25.07% 4,135 2.64% 436
2012 59.29% 9,434 37.86% 6,025 2.85% 453
2008 49.53% 8,043 47.46% 7,708 3.01% 489
2004 67.23% 10,176 31.66% 4,791 1.11% 168
2000 60.91% 7,338 37.22% 4,484 1.87% 225
1996 58.55% 5,886 38.11% 3,831 3.34% 336

Stone County is divided into two legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives, both of which are held by Republicans.

Missouri House of Representatives — District 138 — Stone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Don Phillips 14,254 100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 138 — Stone County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Don Phillips 7,514 100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 138 — Stone County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Don Phillips 13,531 100.00%
  • District 158 — Scott Fitzpatrick (R- Shell Knob). Consists of a small, unincorporated region in the northwest part of the county, located just south of Crane.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 158 — Stone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Scott Fitzpatrick 105 100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 158 — Stone County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Scott Fitzpatrick 47 100.00% +11.54
Missouri House of Representatives — District 158 — Stone County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Scott Fitzpatrick 92 88.46%
Constitution Sue Beck 12 11.54%

All of Stone County is a part of Missouri’s 29th District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by David Sater (R- Cassville).

Missouri Senate — District 29 — Stone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican David Sater 14,004 100.00%
Missouri Senate — District 29 — Stone County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican David Sater 13,503 100.00%

Federal

U.S. Senate — Missouri — Stone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Roy Blunt 11,620 70.33% +14.65
Democratic Jason Kander 4,162 25.19% -11.00
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 448 2.71% -5.42
Green Johnathan McFarland 137 0.83% +0.83
Constitution Fred Ryman 155 0.94% +0.94
U.S. Senate — Missouri — Stone County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Todd Akin 8,769 55.68%
Democratic Claire McCaskill 5,699 36.19%
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 1,281 8.13%

All of Stone County is included in Missouri's 7th Congressional District and is currently represented by Billy Long (R- Springfield) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 7th Congressional District — Stone County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Billy Long 12,384 76.00% +4.55
Democratic Genevieve Williams 3,270 20.07% -1.69
Libertarian Benjamin T. Brixey 640 3.93% -2.86
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 7th Congressional District — Stone County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Billy Long 6,087 71.45% +1.44
Democratic Jim Evans 1,854 21.76% -3.11
Libertarian Kevin Craig 578 6.79% +1.67
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri’s 7th Congressional District — Stone County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Billy Long 10,967 70.01%
Democratic Jim Evans 3,896 24.87%
Libertarian Kevin Craig 802 5.12%

Political culture

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [13]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 79.1% 13,158 17.3% 2,887 3.6% 600
2012 73.5% 11,787 24.5% 3,923 2.1% 337
2008 67.8% 11,147 30.6% 5,029 1.6% 269
2004 69.4% 10,534 30.1% 4,578 0.5% 77
2000 64.1% 7,793 33.4% 4,055 2.5% 303
1996 51.4% 5,223 34.4% 3,497 14.2% 1,441
1992 43.9% 4,035 35.4% 3,256 20.7% 1,905
1988 63.5% 5,080 36.1% 2,889 0.4% 32
1984 72.9% 5,706 27.1% 2,119
1980 66.3% 4,780 30.7% 2,210 3.0% 219
1976 59.2% 3,457 40.4% 2,358 0.5% 27
1972 79.3% 4,180 20.7% 1,094
1968 67.3% 3,006 22.5% 1,004 10.2% 455
1964 56.4% 2,377 43.6% 1,835
1960 78.2% 3,201 21.8% 890
1956 73.7% 2,939 26.3% 1,049
1952 80.7% 3,172 19.0% 748 0.3% 11
1948 71.2% 2,222 28.6% 892 0.2% 7
1944 80.7% 3,080 19.3% 737 0.0% 1
1940 77.4% 3,598 22.4% 1,041 0.2% 8
1936 70.9% 3,366 28.8% 1,366 0.3% 13
1932 47.4% 1,748 51.8% 1,911 0.8% 29
1928 83.9% 2,972 15.8% 559 0.3% 12
1924 65.4% 1,871 21.9% 626 12.7% 363
1920 78.5% 2,749 19.2% 672 2.3% 79
1916 67.2% 1,525 27.4% 621 5.4% 122
1912 41.5% 946 22.2% 506 36.4% 829
1908 69.1% 1,376 24.0% 477 6.9% 138
1904 73.5% 1,219 20.3% 337 6.2% 102
1900 65.1% 1,182 31.6% 573 3.3% 60
1896 56.7% 1,094 42.9% 827 0.4% 7
1892 61.6% 805 21.4% 279 17.1% 223
1888 67.7% 854 24.0% 303 8.3% 105

Like most counties situated in Southwest Missouri, Stone County is a Republican stronghold in presidential elections. George W. Bush carried Stone County in 2000 and 2004 by more than two-to-one margins, and like many other rural counties throughout Missouri, Stone County strongly favored John McCain over Barack Obama in 2008. The solitary Democratic Presidential candidate to win Stone County since the Civil War has been Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932, [14] and even Roosevelt won by only 163 votes out of 3,688. [15]

Like most rural areas throughout the Bible Belt in Southwest Missouri, voters in Stone County traditionally adhere to socially and culturally conservative principles which tend to strongly influence their Republican leanings. In 2004, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to define marriage as the union between a man and a woman—it overwhelmingly passed Stone County with 79.87 percent of the vote. The initiative passed the state with 71 percent of support from voters as Missouri became the first state to ban same-sex marriage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a constitutional amendment to fund and legalize embryonic stem cell research in the state—it narrowly failed in Stone County with 52.80 percent voting against the measure. The initiative narrowly passed the state with 51 percent of support from voters as Missouri became one of the first states in the nation to approve embryonic stem cell research. Despite Stone County’s longstanding tradition of supporting socially conservative platforms, voters in the county have a penchant for advancing populist causes like increasing the minimum wage. In 2006, Missourians voted on a proposition (Proposition B) to increase the minimum wage in the state to $6.50 an hour—it passed Stone County with 76.72 percent of the vote. The proposition strongly passed every single county in Missouri with 78.99 percent voting in favor as the minimum wage was increased to $6.50 an hour in the state. During the same election, voters in five other states also strongly approved increases in the minimum wage.

2008 Missouri presidential primary

Democratic

Former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (D- New York) won Stone County over now President Barack Obama (D- Illinois) by an almost two-to-one margin with 61.76 percent of the vote while Obama received 35.17 percent of the vote. Although he withdrew from the race, former U.S. Senator John Edwards (D- North Carolina) still received 2.16 percent of the vote in Stone County.

Republican

Former Governor Mike Huckabee (R- Arkansas) won Stone County with 45.01 percent of the vote. U.S. Senator John McCain (R- Arizona) finished in second place in Stone County with 31.82 percent. Former Governor Mitt Romney (R- Massachusetts) came in third place, receiving 18.80 percent of the vote while libertarian-leaning U.S. Representative Ron Paul (R- Texas) finished fourth with 2.74 percent in Stone County.

Mike Huckabee received more votes, a total of 2,528, than any candidate from either party in Stone County during the 2008 Missouri presidential primaries.

Transportation

Major highways

Airports

Branson West Airport, [16] also known as Branson West Municipal Airport, [17] [18] is a public-use general aviation airport in Stone County. It is located two nautical miles (3.7 km) west of the central business district of the Branson West, which owns the airport. [16]

Communities

Cities

Villages

Census-designated place

Unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "The History of Stone County". The History of Stone County. Retrieved 24 February 2014.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 22, 2014.
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. ^ Galloway, Nicole. "Stone County Audit" (PDF). Missouri State Auditor. State of Missouri. Retrieved 18 May 2016.
  12. ^ Galloway, Nicole. "Stone County Audit" (PDF). Missouri State Auditor. State of Missouri. Retrieved 18 May 2016.
  13. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-27.
  14. ^ Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868-2004, pp. 239-246 ISBN  0786422173
  15. ^ Robinson, Edgar Eugene; The Presidential Vote; 1896-1932 (second edition); pp. 226-227 Published 1947 by Stanford University Press
  16. ^ a b FAA Airport Master Record for FWB ( Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective 11 February 2010.
  17. ^ "Branson West Municipal Airport". City of Branson West. Archived from the original on February 21, 2010. Retrieved March 3, 2010.
  18. ^ "Branson West airport runway open for business". Associated Press. December 18, 2009.[ permanent dead link]

External links