Sedgwick County, Kansas Article

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Sedgwick County, Kansas
County
Sedgwick county kansas courthouse 2009.jpg
Old Sedgwick County Courthouse in Wichita
Map of Kansas highlighting Sedgwick County
Location in the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 26, 1867
Named for John Sedgwick
Seat Wichita
Largest cityWichita
Area
 • Total1,009 sq mi (2,613 km2)
 • Land998 sq mi (2,585 km2)
 • Water12 sq mi (31 km2), 1.2%
Population (est.)
 • ( 2016)511,995
 • Density500/sq mi (200/km2)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/ −5
Website SedgwickCounty.org

Sedgwick County ( county code: SG) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 498,365, [1] making it the second-most populous county in Kansas. The county seat is Wichita, [2] the most populous city in the state.

History

1915 Railroad Map of Sedgwick County

Early history

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau. In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles.

In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre. In 1848, after the Mexican–American War, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo with Spain brought into the United States all or part of land for ten future states, including southwest Kansas. In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state.

19th century

Sedgwick County was founded in 1867, and named after John Sedgwick, who was a Major General in the Union Army during the American Civil War. [3]

In 1887, the Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Railway built a branch line north-south from Herington to Caldwell. [4] This branch line connected Herington, Lost Springs, Lincolnville, Antelope, Marion, Aulne, Peabody, Elbing, Whitewater, Furley, Kechi, Wichita, Peck, Corbin, Wellington, Caldwell. By 1893, this branch line was incrementally built to Fort Worth, Texas. This line is called the "OKT". The Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Railway was foreclosed in 1891 and was taken over by Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway, which shut down in 1980 and reorganized as Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas Railroad, merged in 1988 with Missouri Pacific Railroad, and finally merged in 1997 with Union Pacific Railroad. Most locals still refer to this railroad as the "Rock Island".

20th century

Sedgwick County was the setting for the murders committed by the BTK strangler from 1974 until 1991.[ citation needed] Dennis Rader, an employee of the Sedgwick County city of Park City was arrested in early 2005 after he began sending incriminating letters taunting the police in 2004. He had not been heard from since 1979.[ citation needed] Ken Landwehr of the Wichita Police Department led the task force which captured Rader, setting a new standard of serial crime detection in the process, which is still studied by police departments across the world. Rader is serving 10 life sentences at the El Dorado Correctional Facility in El Dorado.[ citation needed]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,009 square miles (2,610 km2), of which 998 square miles (2,580 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (1.2%) is water. [5]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18701,095
188018,7531,612.6%
189043,626132.6%
190044,0370.9%
191073,09566.0%
192092,23426.2%
1930136,33047.8%
1940143,3115.1%
1950222,29055.1%
1960343,23154.4%
1970350,6942.2%
1980366,5314.5%
1990403,66210.1%
2000452,86912.2%
2010498,36510.0%
Est. 2016511,995 [6]2.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2016 [1]
Age pyramid

Sedgwick County is part of the Wichita, KS Metropolitan Statistical Area.

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 452,869 people, 176,444 households, and 117,688 families residing in the county. The population density was 453 people per square mile (175/km²). There were 191,133 housing units at an average density of 191 per square mile (74/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.38% White, 9.13% Black or African American, 1.11% Native American, 3.34% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 4.17% from other races, and 2.81% from two or more races. 8.04% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 176,444 households out of which 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.70% were married couples living together, 10.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.30% were non-families. 28.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.20% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 11.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,485, and the median income for a family was $51,645. Males had a median income of $37,770 versus $26,153 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,907. About 7.00% of families and 9.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.90% of those under age 18 and 7.00% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Presidential elections

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 54.4% 104,353 36.3% 69,627 9.3% 17,818
2012 58.2% 106,506 39.4% 71,977 2.4% 4,412
2008 55.2% 106,849 42.5% 82,337 2.4% 4,544
2004 62.1% 110,381 36.5% 64,839 1.4% 2,459
2000 57.4% 93,724 38.3% 62,561 4.4% 7,132
1996 56.1% 93,397 35.8% 59,643 8.1% 13,559
1992 40.5% 75,577 33.6% 62,670 25.9% 48,228
1988 55.3% 86,124 42.1% 65,618 2.6% 4,003
1984 62.5% 95,874 36.1% 55,263 1.4% 2,178
1980 51.8% 75,317 37.9% 55,105 10.3% 15,009
1976 50.7% 69,828 46.5% 63,989 2.8% 3,812
1972 65.7% 83,949 30.7% 39,220 3.6% 4,532
1968 51.8% 60,853 37.5% 44,041 10.7% 12,575
1964 43.8% 52,592 55.2% 66,372 1.0% 1,217
1960 55.2% 73,501 44.3% 58,887 0.5% 696
1956 61.1% 72,292 38.6% 45,732 0.3% 336
1952 66.5% 70,983 32.7% 34,926 0.8% 879
1948 49.6% 39,165 48.9% 38,621 1.6% 1,243
1944 52.8% 38,896 46.7% 34,442 0.5% 360
1940 48.1% 32,160 51.1% 34,219 0.8% 547
1936 35.3% 21,654 64.4% 39,503 0.3% 197
1932 41.5% 21,815 55.8% 29,344 2.7% 1,435
1928 74.4% 32,132 24.7% 10,649 0.9% 405
1924 57.2% 21,144 23.6% 8,712 19.2% 7,087
1920 59.2% 16,642 39.1% 10,998 1.8% 494
1916 41.8% 10,899 51.3% 13,391 6.9% 1,792
1912 9.8% 1,419 39.6% 5,752 50.6% 7,350 [a]
1908 50.3% 6,756 45.0% 6,049 4.8% 640
1904 60.8% 6,697 26.0% 2,869 13.2% 1,455
1900 50.0% 5,363 48.0% 5,144 2.0% 212
1896 42.7% 4,122 56.3% 5,434 1.1% 102
1892 46.7% 4,770 53.3% 5,448
1888 55.5% 6,071 36.8% 4,025 7.7% 841

Sedgwick County is fairly conservative for an urban county. It has only gone Democratic in a presidential election once since 1944. Democratic strength is concentrated in Wichita, while the suburban areas are strongly Republican.

Laws

Sedgwick County was a prohibition, or "dry", county until the Kansas Constitution was amended in 1986 and voters approved the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with a 30 percent food sales requirement. The food sales requirement was removed with voter approval in 1988. [13]

Transportation

Airports

The following public-use airports are located in Sedgwick County:

The following are closed airports:

Education

Unified school districts

Points of interest

Communities

2005 KDOT Map of Sedgwick County ( map legend)
Map of Townships in Sedgwick County

Cities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated places

Ghost towns

  • Davidson
  • Hatfield
  • Huckle
  • Jamesburg
  • Marshall
  • Oatville
  • Wichita Heights

Townships

Sedgwick County is divided into twenty-seven townships. The cities of Bel Aire and Wichita are considered governmentally independent and are excluded from the census figures for the townships. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size. The county use to have one more township, Wichita Township, but it no longer exists. [15]

Sources: 2000 U.S. Gazetteer from the U.S. Census Bureau.
Township FIPS Population
center
Population Population
density
/km² (/sq mi)
Land area
km² (sq mi)
Water area
km² (sq mi)
Water % Geographic coordinates
Afton 00425 1,290 14 (37) 91 (35) 2 (1) 1.73% 37°36′10″N 97°37′54″W / 37.60278°N 97.63167°W / 37.60278; -97.63167
Attica 03125 Goddard 4,959 62 (161) 80 (31) 0 (0) 0.23% 37°40′44″N 97°32′16″W / 37.67889°N 97.53778°W / 37.67889; -97.53778
Delano 17375 196 25 (64) 8 (3) 1 (0) 13.81% 37°43′2″N 97°25′13″W / 37.71722°N 97.42028°W / 37.71722; -97.42028
Eagle 19250 Bentley 1,069 12 (30) 92 (36) 1 (1) 1.44% 37°51′48″N 97°32′26″W / 37.86333°N 97.54056°W / 37.86333; -97.54056
Erie 21550 106 1 (3) 94 (36) 0 (0) 0.03% 37°31′24″N 97°44′51″W / 37.52333°N 97.74750°W / 37.52333; -97.74750
Garden Plain 25400 Garden Plain 1,780 19 (50) 92 (36) 0 (0) 0.15% 37°40′25″N 97°39′47″W / 37.67361°N 97.66306°W / 37.67361; -97.66306
Grand River 27300 607 7 (17) 91 (35) 2 (1) 2.20% 37°40′6″N 97°45′14″W / 37.66833°N 97.75389°W / 37.66833; -97.75389
Grant 28125 Valley Center (part) 3,710 40 (104) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.47% 37°50′55″N 97°20′23″W / 37.84861°N 97.33972°W / 37.84861; -97.33972
Greeley 28400 Mount Hope 1,094 12 (31) 93 (36) 1 (1) 1.43% 37°52′21″N 97°39′17″W / 37.87250°N 97.65472°W / 37.87250; -97.65472
Gypsum 29300 5,822 64 (164) 92 (35) 0 (0) 0.51% 37°36′26″N 97°12′34″W / 37.60722°N 97.20944°W / 37.60722; -97.20944
Illinois 33775 1,620 18 (45) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.12% 37°35′54″N 97°31′53″W / 37.59833°N 97.53139°W / 37.59833; -97.53139
Kechi 36250 Park City 8,041 143 (370) 56 (22) 0 (0) 0.23% 37°47′35″N 97°19′14″W / 37.79306°N 97.32056°W / 37.79306; -97.32056
Lincoln 41150 473 5 (13) 91 (35) 0 (0) 0.12% 37°52′35″N 97°11′53″W / 37.87639°N 97.19806°W / 37.87639; -97.19806
Minneha 47125 Eastborough 5,084 117 (304) 43 (17) 1 (0) 1.49% 37°41′11″N 97°11′25″W / 37.68639°N 97.19028°W / 37.68639; -97.19028
Morton 48550 Cheney 2,380 26 (67) 91 (35) 1 (0) 1.14% 37°37′24″N 97°46′33″W / 37.62333°N 97.77583°W / 37.62333; -97.77583
Ninnescah 50725 Clearwater 2,913 31 (81) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.47% 37°30′51″N 97°31′28″W / 37.51417°N 97.52444°W / 37.51417; -97.52444
Ohio 52450 1,146 12 (32) 94 (36) 0 (0) 0.14% 37°31′56″N 97°25′21″W / 37.53222°N 97.42250°W / 37.53222; -97.42250
Park 54425 Maize 4,128 51 (131) 82 (32) 2 (1) 2.04% 37°46′26″N 97°26′13″W / 37.77389°N 97.43694°W / 37.77389; -97.43694
Payne 55075 1,119 14 (36) 80 (31) 0 (0) 0.21% 37°46′58″N 97°12′22″W / 37.78278°N 97.20611°W / 37.78278; -97.20611
Riverside 60125 Haysville (part)
Derby (part)
Oaklawn-Sunview CDP
15,694 333 (862) 47 (18) 1 (0) 1.98% 37°34′56″N 97°18′22″W / 37.58222°N 97.30611°W / 37.58222; -97.30611
Rockford 60675 Derby (part) 20,019 198 (514) 101 (39) 1 (0) 0.99% 37°31′55″N 97°14′47″W / 37.53194°N 97.24639°W / 37.53194; -97.24639
Salem 62675 Haysville (part) 8,411 102 (263) 83 (32) 1 (0) 0.95% 37°32′23″N 97°20′11″W / 37.53972°N 97.33639°W / 37.53972; -97.33639
Sherman 65100 Andale 1,362 14 (37) 96 (37) 0 (0) 0.22% 37°47′23″N 97°38′4″W / 37.78972°N 97.63444°W / 37.78972; -97.63444
Union 72375 Colwich 2,156 23 (60) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.23% 37°46′55″N 97°32′8″W / 37.78194°N 97.53556°W / 37.78194; -97.53556
Valley Center 73275 Valley Center (part) 3,642 39 (100) 94 (36) 0 (0) 0.16% 37°51′22″N 97°24′10″W / 37.85611°N 97.40278°W / 37.85611; -97.40278
Viola 74050 Viola 547 6 (15) 93 (36) 1 (0) 0.98% 37°30′41″N 97°39′3″W / 37.51139°N 97.65083°W / 37.51139; -97.65083
Waco 74300 3,381 45 (117) 75 (29) 0 (0) 0.12% 37°36′35″N 97°24′57″W / 37.60972°N 97.41583°W / 37.60972; -97.41583

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Kansas State Historical Society (1916). Biennial Report of the Board of Directors of the Kansas State Historical Society. Kansas State Printing Plant. p. 205.
  4. ^ Rock Island Rail History
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 29, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 29, 2014.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  12. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  13. ^ "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2006. Archived from the original on October 8, 2007. Retrieved December 28, 2007.
  14. ^ http://geonames.usgs.gov/pls/gnispublic/f?p=115:3:103222460506338::NO:3:P3_FID,P3_TITLE:473853%2CTrails%20View
  15. ^ County Map from Historical Atlas of Sedgwick County, Kansas; John P. Edwards; 50 pages; 1882.
Notes
  1. ^ This total comprises 6,546 votes (45.08 percent) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt (who carried the county) and 804 votes (5.54 percent) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs.

Further reading

External links

County
Historical
Maps


SEDGWICK COUNTY KANSAS Latitude and Longitude:

37°43′N 97°27′W / 37.717°N 97.450°W / 37.717; -97.450