Recall elections in Wisconsin Article

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A recall election in the state of Wisconsin is a procedure by which voters can remove an elected official from office through a direct vote before his or her term has ended.

History

In 1911, newly elected Governor Francis E. McGovern laid out his progressive vision for Wisconsin, which included a proposal for a recall. [1] The next week, State Senator Paul O. Husting introduced Senate Joint Resolution 9, which allowed for the recall of every office holder in the state, including both those elected and appointed. [1] Several senators did not like that the recall also applied to judges, and attached an exemption for judges. The bill passed the Senate 20-7. [1] The bill was then passed by the Assembly 64-1. [1]

Since proposed amendments to the Wisconsin Constitution must pass two consecutive legislatures before going to the people for a vote, Husting introduced his bill again on February 11, 1913. [1] [2] The bill passed the Senate 26-1, and the Assembly 72-17. [1] The proposed amendment then when to the voters, who, in November 1914, voted it down by a margin of 64 percent to 36 percent. [1]

A second attempt at a recall amendment came in 1923, when Senator Henry Huber introduced Senate Joint Resolution 39, which allowed for the recall of public officials. [1] It passed the Senate 17-12, and the Assembly 60-10. [1] In 1924, Huber was elected Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin, so the second introduction of the resolution was taken up by Max W. Heck. [1] It passed the Senate 22-8, and the Assembly 70-22. [1] The resolution was scheduled to appear on the November 2, 1926 ballot.

There was strong opposition to the proposed amendment, because it allowed for the recall of state judges. Organizations, such as the State Bar of Wisconsin, [3] the Milwaukee Bar Association, [4] Archbishop Sebastian Gebhard Messmer [5] and the editorial boards of the Milwaukee Journal [6] and the Milwaukee Sentinel. [1]

The proposed amendment also had its supporters, including the editorial board of the Wisconsin State Journal, [7] the Wisconsin State Federation of Labor, [8] and U.S. Senator Robert M. La Follette Jr. [9]

The amendment passed, by a margin of 50.6 percent to 49.4 percent. [1]

In 2011, State Senator Jim Holperin became the first state legislator to be subject to a recall in two different legislative bodies: the Assembly in 1990, and the State Senate in 2011. [10]

In 2012, Governor Scott Walker became the first governor in U.S. history to survive a recall. [11]

Legislation summary

1926 creation

The recall was officially created in November 1926 by constitutional amendment. [12] The rules established in the constitution are: [12]

  • Voters may petition for the recall of any elected official after the first year of their term
  • The petition must be signed by voters equal to at least 25 percent of the vote in the last gubernatorial election in the district from which the elected official is to be recalled
  • A special election will be held between 40 and 45 days from the filing of the petition
  • The official being recalled will continue to perform their duties until the result of the election is officially declared
  • Other candidates for the office will be nominated in accordance with normal election rules
  • The candidate who receives the most votes will serve for the remainder of the term
  • The name of the elected official who is being recalled will be on the ballot unless they resign within 10 days of the petition being filed
  • After one successful petition and election, no other recall attempts can be made for the remainder of the term

1981 amendment

In 1981, the constitution was amended, which changed the rules for recalls. [12] This amendment changed the rules, which follow: [12]

  • Voters may petition for the recall of any elected official after the first year of their term
  • The petition must be signed by voters equal to at least 25 percent of the vote in the last gubernatorial election in the district from which the elected official is to be recalled
  • A special election will be held on the Tuesday six weeks after the petition is filed, or the next Tuesday if that day is a holiday
  • The official being recalled will continue to perform their duties until the result of the election is officially declared
  • Other candidates for the office will be nominated in accordance with normal election rules
  • If more than two people run for a nonpartisan office, or if more than two people run in the same political party for a partisan office, a recall primary will be held
  • In the case of a recall primary, the date above will be used, and the general election will be held on the Tuesday four weeks after the primary
  • The name of the elected official who is being recalled will be on the ballot unless they resign within 10 days of the petition being filed
  • After one successful petition and election, no other recall attempts can be made for the remainder of the term

Recall attempts

Successful recalls

Unsuccessful recalls

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Christian Schneider (April 2012). "The History of the Recall in Wisconsin". Wisconsin Policy Research Institute. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  2. ^ State.wi.us, Wisconsin Constitution Article XII. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  3. ^ "Lawyers Unite Against Recall". Milwaukee Sentinel. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. October 26, 1926.
  4. ^ "Vote 'No' on Recall, Bar Advises". Milwaukee Sentinel. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. October 28, 1926.
  5. ^ "Prelate Also Opposes Recall of Judges: Clergyman Calls Proposed Amendment 'Dangerous Move that Threatens Stability of Courts'". Milwaukee Sentinel. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. October 31, 1926.
  6. ^ "On, Wisconsin: The Recall". Milwaukee Journal. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. October 31, 1926.
  7. ^ "Judicial Recall". Wisconsin State Journal. Madison, Wisconsin. October 29, 2016.
  8. ^ Straus, Leo (October 31, 2016). "News of Interest to Madison Labor". Wisconsin State Journal. Madison, Wisconsin.
  9. ^ "La Follette, in Statement, Urges Support of Amendment and Election of Blaine". Wisconsin State Journal. Madison, Wisconsin. October 29, 1926.
  10. ^ a b Heather Sawaski (February 22, 2011). "Sen. Holperin reacts to recall efforts". WAOW-TV. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  11. ^ Brian Montopoli (June 6, 2012). "Scott Walker wins Wisconsin recall election". CBS News. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  12. ^ a b c d "2015-2016 Wisconsin Blue Book: Chapter 3 - Wisconsin Constitution" (PDF). State of Wisconsin. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  13. ^ Jean DiMotto (June 20, 2016). "Stanford rape case raises question of when judges should be punished". Wisconsin Law Journal. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  14. ^ 'Recall vote removes five in La Crosse,' Racine Journal Times, August 3, 1977, pg. 7A
  15. ^ 'La Crosse recall election removes 4 School Board members,' Milwaukee Journal, July 15, 1992, pg. A13
  16. ^ a b "State.wi.us" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-12-09. Retrieved 2010-05-09.
  17. ^ State.wi.us Archived 2006-12-09 at the Wayback Machine., Wisconsin Constitution Article XIII, section 12
  18. ^ a b Paul Medinger (October 21, 2009). "Almost a total recall: 7 Monroe County supervisors ousted". La Crosse Tribune. Retrieved August 2, 2016.
  19. ^ 'Recall vote ousts Monroe County Board chairman,' Milwaukee Sentinel Journal, Meg Jones, November 9, 2009
  20. ^ a b c d e f Patrick Marley and Emma Roller (May 31, 2011). "Panel OKs recall elections against 3 more Republicans". Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  21. ^ "Sheboygan mayoral recall: Mayor Bob Ryan ousted from office by challenger Terry Van Akkeren". Sheboygan Press. Sheboygan, WI. February 21, 2012. Retrieved February 22, 2012.
  22. ^ "Wisconsin June 5 recall election results". Milwakee Wisconsin Journal-Sentinel. June 6, 2012. Retrieved June 10, 2012.
  23. ^ 'Deanna Verdon wins Onalaska recall election in landslide against incumbent Jake Speed,' La Crosse Tribune, Tobias Mann, November 29, 2017
  24. ^ Recall Election Archived 2011-07-08 at the Wayback Machine.
  25. ^ 'Effort to recall Obey fails, organizer says,' The Racine Journal Times, June 1, 1990
  26. ^ a b c Tom Tolan and Patrick Marley (August 10, 2011). "Republicans take 4 of 6 in recall elections, hold Senate". Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  27. ^ a b Monica Davey (March 30, 2012). "Recall Election for Wisconsin Governor Who Battled Unions". New York Times. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  28. ^ a b Jack Craver (June 6, 2012). "Madison Politiscope: Democrats claim the state Senate — does it matter?". The Capital Times. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  29. ^ La Crosse Council Pres Keeps Seat
  30. ^ Alyssa Fenske (September 27, 2012). "Recall of city council president Audrey Kader". WEAU-TV. Retrieved July 31, 2016.
  31. ^ Results: November 22, 2016 Recall Election-Town of Paris

External links