Puerto Rican general election, 2016 Article

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Puerto Rican general election, 2016

←  2012 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2020 →
Turnout55.10%
  Ricardo Rosselló in 2016.png David Bernier in 2016.png
Nominee Ricardo Rosselló David Bernier
Party New Progressive Popular Democratic
Popular vote 649,791 605,710
Percentage 41.76% 38.93%

  Alexandra Lúgaro in 2016.png Manuel Cidre.png
Nominee Alexandra Lúgaro Manuel Cidre
Party Independent Independent
Popular vote 174,529 89,890
Percentage 11.12% 5.73%

Puerto Rican general election, 2016 map.png
Election results map. Blue denotes municipalities won by Rosselló, and Red denotes those won by Bernier.

Governor before election

Alejandro García Padilla
Popular Democratic

Elected Governor

Ricardo Rosselló
New Progressive

General elections were held in Puerto Rico on Tuesday, November 8, 2016 to elect the officials of the Puerto Rican government that will serve from January 2017 to January 2021, most notably the Governor of Puerto Rico.

Governor of Puerto Rico

Nominations

Before the election year, the Constitution of Puerto Rico provides for any qualified person to present their candidacy for a specific position. If two or more candidates from the same party present their candidacy for the same position, and they can't reach an agreement within the party, a primary election is held. This election is held within the inscribed members of each party, to select which of the candidates will represent the party in the general election.

Both of the main parties: New Progressive Party (PNP) and Popular Democratic Party (PPD), held primaries for several positions on June 5, 2016.

New Progressive Party (PNP)

The primaries were held on June 5, 2016 to determine candidates for Governor of Puerto Rico, the Senate, House of Representatives, and others.

Popular Democratic Party (PPD)

The primaries were held on June 5, 2016 to determine several candidates for the Senate, House of Representatives, and others.

Minority parties

Two minority parties officialized their gubernatorial candidates. The Working People's Party (PPT) nominated Rafael Bernabe once again. [1] The Puerto Rican Independence Party (PIP) nominated María de Lourdes Santiago.

Independents

As of November 2015, two independent candidates expressed their interest in running for Governor:

Final candidates

Governor

The official candidates for the position of Governor of Puerto Rico are:

Resident Commissioner

The official candidates for the position of Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico are:

Senate of Puerto Rico

At-large

The ballot featured sixteen (16) candidates from four different parties and one independent candidate (bold denotes incumbent candidates)

District

House of Representatives

At-large

The ballot featured sixteen (16) candidates from four different parties (bold denotes incumbent candidates)

Results

Governor

Candidate Party Votes %
Ricky Rosselló New Progressive Party 655,626 41.76
David Bernier Popular Democratic Party 610,956 38.92
Alexandra Lúgaro Independent 174,529 11.12
Manuel Cidre Independent 89,890 5.73
María de Lourdes Santiago Puerto Rican Independence Party 33,452 2.13
Rafael Bernabe Riefkohl Working People's Party 5,374 0.34
Invalid/blank votes 9,797
Total 1,589,624 100
Registered voters/turnout 2,867,557 55.10
Source: CEEPUR

The candidate from the New Progressive Party (PNP) Ricky Rosselló beat the candidate from the Popular Democratic Party (PPD) David Bernier obtaining 41.76% of the votes against 38.92% for Bernier. Most notably, the two independent candidates – Alexandra Lúgaro and Manuel Cidre – managed to arrive in third and fourth place with 11.12% and 5.73% respectively. For the fourth election in a row, the candidate of the Puerto Rican Independence Party (PIP) failed to receive the required 3% of the votes to remain registered. The same result happened to Rafael Bernabe from the Working People's Party (PPT) for the second election in a row.

Senate

e •  d Summary of the 8 November 2016 Puerto Rican Senate election
Parties District At-large Total seats Composition
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
New Progressive Party (PNP) 1,440,050 50.4 15 664,553 45.3 6 21
21 / 30
Popular Democratic Party (PPD) 1,210,903 42.4 1 503,630 34.3 6 7
7 / 30
Puerto Rican Independence Party (PIP) 150,904 5.3 0 130,583 8.9 1 1
1 / 30
Working People's Party (PPT) 53,335 1.9 0 9,957 0.7 0 0
0 / 30
Independents 0 0.0 0 157,788 10.8 1 1
1 / 30
Total 2,855,192 100.0 16 1,466,511 100.0 14 30
Source: CEEPUR

House of Representatives

e •  d Summary of the 8 November 2016 Puerto Rican House of Representatives election
Parties District At-large Total seats Composition
Votes % Seats Votes % Seats
New Progressive Party (PNP) 750,840 50.3 28 705,753 48.6 6 34
34 / 51
Popular Democratic Party (PPD) 644,316 43.2 12 605,887 41.7 4 16
16 / 51
Puerto Rican Independence Party (PIP) 71,442 4.8 0 121,066 8.3 1 1
1 / 51
Working People's Party (PPT) 22,169 1.5 0 19,537 1.3 0 0
0 / 51
Independents 3,697 0.2 0 0 0 0 0
0 / 51
Total 1,492,464 100.0 40 1,452,243 100.0 11 51
Source: CEEPUR

Resident Commissioner

Candidate Party Votes %
Jenniffer González New Progressive Party 713,605 48.77
Héctor Ferrer Popular Democratic Party 691,419 47.25
Hugo Rodríguez Puerto Rican Independence Party 39,395 2.69
Mariana Nogales Working People's Party of Puerto Rico 18,871 1.29
Invalid/blank votes 116,359
Total 1,579,649 100
Registered voters/turnout 2,867,557 55.08
Source: CEEPUR

Mayoral

PPD PNP PIP PPT Total
45 33 0 0 78
Source: CEEPUR

Despite losing most of the Senate and the House, the Popular Democratic Party (PPD) managed to win a majority of the mayoralty races in the island, with a total of 45 out of 78 municipalities. The New Progressive Party (PNP) won a total of 33.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Bernabe aspirará nuevamente a la gobernación por el PPT". El Nuevo Día. October 25, 2015. Retrieved November 29, 2015.
  2. ^ Figueroa, Alex (March 17, 2015). "Abogada Alexandra Lúgaro oficializa su candidatura independiente para la gobernación". Primera Hora. Retrieved December 1, 2015.
  3. ^ "Manuel Cidre oficializa candidatura independiente a la gobernación". Metro. December 1, 2015. Retrieved December 1, 2015.