Princess Anne, Maryland Article

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Princess Anne, Maryland
Town
Somerset County Courthouse in Princess Anne
Somerset County Courthouse in Princess Anne
Location in Somerset County and the state of Maryland
Location in Somerset County and the state of Maryland
Princess Anne is located in Maryland
Princess Anne
Princess Anne
Location within the state of Maryland
Princess Anne is located in the US
Princess Anne
Princess Anne
Princess Anne (the US)
Coordinates: 38°12′35″N 75°41′42″W / 38.20972°N 75.69500°W / 38.20972; -75.69500
PRINCESS ANNE MARYLAND Latitude and Longitude:

38°12′35″N 75°41′42″W / 38.20972°N 75.69500°W / 38.20972; -75.69500
Country United States
State  Maryland
County Somerset
Founded1733
Incorporated1867 [1]
Area [2]
 • Total1.69 sq mi (4.38 km2)
 • Land1.67 sq mi (4.33 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation18 ft (5 m)
Population ( 2010) [3]
 • Total3,290
 • Estimate (2016) [4]3,593
 • Density1,900/sq mi (750/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 ( EST)
 • Summer ( DST) UTC-4 ( EDT)
ZIP code21853
Area code(s) 410
FIPS code24-64000
GNIS feature ID0591074
Website http://www.townofprincessanne.com/

Princess Anne is a town in Somerset County, Maryland, United States, and also serves as its county seat. [5] The population was 3,290 at the 2010 census.

Princess Anne is included in the Salisbury, Maryland–Delaware Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The town is notable as the location of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and the home of the Teackle Mansion.

History

With a population just under 4,000 people, this town at the head of the Manokin River was named for Princess Anne of Great Britain, daughter of King George II. It was established in 1733 and serves as the county seat for Somerset County (the southernmost county in Maryland).

In the mid-18th century, Princess Anne gained considerable importance as a market center because of the river trade. This was later augmented by the southward extension of the Eastern Shore Railroad on Maryland's Eastern Shore. At that time, the Manokin River was navigable as far as the bridge at Princess Anne.

Much of the town's architectural heritage from those days has been preserved. About 150 acres (0.6 km²) of the old town, containing about 300 structures, is entered on the National Register of Historic Places as the Princess Anne Historic District.

In addition to the Princess Anne Historic District, the Adams Farm, Beckford, Beverly, Catalpa Farm, Glebe House, Harrington, Manokin Historic District, Manokin Presbyterian Church, Mt. Zion Memorial Church, Dr. William B. Pritchard House, Somerset Academy Archaeological Site, Teackle Mansion, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Waddy House, Waterloo, and White Hall are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [6]

Princess Anne has the ignoble distinction of being the site of the last lynching in Maryland history. In 1933, a black man named George Armwood was accused of assaulting an elderly white woman. He was removed from the Princess Anne jail by a white mob, dragged around town by a truck, and eventually hanged. After his death, the rope that formed the noose was cut up and distributed as a souvenir. [7]

Geography

Princess Anne is located at 38°12′N 75°42′W / 38.200°N 75.700°W / 38.200; -75.700 (38.204, –75.695). [8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.69 square miles (4.38 km2), of which, 1.67 square miles (4.33 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water. [2]

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Princess Anne has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [9]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870805
1880751−6.7%
189086515.2%
1900854−1.3%
19101,00617.8%
1920968−3.8%
19309750.7%
1940942−3.4%
19501,40749.4%
19601,351−4.0%
1970975−27.8%
19801,49953.7%
19901,66611.1%
20002,31338.8%
20103,29042.2%
Est. 20163,593 [4]9.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]

2010 census

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 3,290 people, 1,276 households, and 652 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,970.1 inhabitants per square mile (760.7/km2). There were 1,500 housing units at an average density of 898.2 per square mile (346.8/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 57.1% White, 38.4% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.4% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.9% of the population.

There were 1,276 households of which 30.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 25.3% were married couples living together, 22.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 48.9% were non-families. 37.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.04.

The median age in the town was 24.7 years. 21.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 29% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.6% were from 25 to 44; 17.7% were from 45 to 64; and 8.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 40.1% male and 59.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census [11] of 2000, there were 2,313 people, 992 households, and 498 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,843.2 people per square mile (714.4/km²). There were 1,117 housing units at an average density of 890.1 per square mile (345.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 34.59% White, 62.86% African American, 0.56% Native American, 0.78% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.69% of the population.

There were 992 households out of which 26.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 25.4% were married couples living together, 21.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 49.7% were non-families. 38.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the town, the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 20.2% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 17.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.7 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $20,066, and the median income for a family was $26,351. Males had a median income of $19,492 versus $22,857 for females. The per capita income for the town was $10,944. About 30.1% of families and 39.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 53.8% of those under age 18 and 21.0% of those age 65 or over.

Colleges and universities

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "Princess Anne". Maryland Manual. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  6. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  7. ^ "Conspiracy of Silence in Md. Lynching Orgy". The Pittsburgh Courier. 28 October 1933.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. ^ Climate Summary for Princess Anne, Maryland
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. ^ "George Armwood (b. 1911 - d. 1933)". Biographical Series. Archives of Maryland. Retrieved 17 January 2015.

External links