Michele Reagan Article

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Michele Reagan
Michele Reagan by Gage Skidmore.jpg
20th Secretary of State of Arizona
Assumed office
January 5, 2015
Governor Doug Ducey
Preceded by Ken Bennett
Succeeded by Katie Hobbs (Elect)
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 23rd district
In office
January 14, 2013 – January 12, 2015
Preceded bySteve Smith [1]
Succeeded by John Kavanagh
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 8th district
In office
January 3, 2011 – January 3, 2013
Preceded byCarolyn Allen [2]
Succeeded by Barbara McGuire
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 8th district
In office
January 13, 2003 – January 3, 2011
Serving with Colette Rosati, John Kavanagh
Preceded byBobby Lugo
Mark Maiorana [3]
Succeeded by John Kavanagh
Michelle Ugenti-Rita [4]
Personal details
Born (1969-10-13) October 13, 1969 (age 49)
Rockford, Illinois, U.S.
Political party Republican
Education Illinois State University ( BA)

Michele Reagan (born October 13, 1969) is an American Republican politician who is the 20th and current Arizona Secretary of State, succeeding Ken Bennett in 2015.

Early life

A native of Rockford, Illinois, Reagan first moved to Arizona in 1991 with her family and opened a Fastsigns.[ clarification needed]

Reagan graduated from Illinois State University and was named by the Aspen Institute to its Rodel Fellowship, a program designed to bring together elected officials who have demonstrated an outstanding ability to work responsibly across partisan divisions and bring greater civility to public discourse.[ citation needed]

Career

Reagan was first elected to the Arizona State House in 2002. She was first elected to the Arizona State Senate in 2010.[ citation needed] She was named Chair of the Commerce Committee in the House, and later, Chair of the Economic Development and Jobs Creation Committee in the Senate. Michele Reagan also contributed to the formation of the first Senate Elections Committee, of which she served as Committee Chair. Michele Reagan was elected to serve as Arizona's 20th Secretary of State in 2014.

Reagan voted in support of a bill that was referred as the "birther bill" in 2011, which required candidates to prove their citizenship to the secretary of state of Arizona, and bill 1062, a controversial religious freedom bill that was vetoed by Governor Jan Brewer. [5] [6]

Reagan has earned her numerous awards and accolades including: Small Business Guardian from the National Federation of Independent Business, the Eye of the Eagle award from the Arizona Small Business Association and the Best Legislator in 2008 from the Arizona Capitol Times. Additionally, she was named one of the 50 most Influential Women in Arizona by AZBusiness Magazine in 2013.

In March 2017, State Senator Steve Montenegro announced a primary challenge to Michele Reagan citing what he described as her "long and liberal voting record." [7] Later, however, Montenegro announced he would run for Congress instead of Secretary of State. [8] She faced Steve Gaynor, a businessman, in the Republican primary in 2018. [9] She lost the 2018 primary. [10]

Political positions

Michele Reagan is a moderate Republican. [11] [12] Reagan has been given an 80% conservative rating by the American Conservative Union. [13] The Arizona Chapter of Americans for Prosperity gave Reagan a 58% grade on conservative issues. [14] She is fiscally conservative and voted against the Medicaid expansion, an online sales tax, and she voted to cut business taxes. On social issues, she has a mixed record. She is pro-choice and was the only Republican in the Arizona Senate to vote against banning abortions after 20 weeks. [15] She supported same-sex marriage after it was legalized in Arizona. [16]

Fiscal positions

She was given a score of 47% by the fiscally conservative Goldwater Institute in 2010. [17] In 2010, Reagan was rated 38% by Americans for Prosperity and was rated 63% in 2014. [18] The Arizona chapter of Americans for Prosperity gave her a grade of 58% in 2006 and 36% in 2008 based on "Positions on Conservative Issues." [19] She was endorsed by the Arizona Chamber of Commerce. [20] In 2012, the Goldwater Institute gave her a 71% on tax and budget issues. [21] Reagan voted for the Medicaid expansion in Arizona in order to move the vote forward, but she voted against the Medicaid expansion during its last vote. [22] She voted to reduce taxes for businesses and voted against imposing a sales tax on online sales. [23] In 2012, she voted to expand requirements for unemployment benefits; in 2013, she voted to expand Medicaid eligibility. [24] In 2014, she voted to regulate ride-sharing companies. [25] She also voted to establish working requirements in order to receive welfare benefits. [26]

Social positions

Michele Reagan has been given mixed ratings from pro-choice and pro-life organizations regarding abortion. In 2012, Reagan was given a rating of 50% by NARAL/Arizona Right to Choose. In 2011 and 2009 respectively, she was given a 60% and 67% rating by Planned Parenthood. Her highest pro-choice score was 100% given by Planned Parenthood. [27] The pro-life organization, Arizona Right to Life, gave her a 66% rating. [27]

In 2011, Reagan voted against HB2416 which defined the abortion pill as a surgery, and voted against a bill prohibiting physicians assistants from providing an abortion pill; conversely, Reagan voted in favor of a bill making Planned Parenthood ineligible for The Working Poor Tax Credit. [28] Reagan voted against banning abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. [29] She also broke with her party and voted with Democrats against allowing employers to refuse to provide birth control coverage to employees. [30]

On LGBT issues, she has a mixed record. She voted in favor of defining marriage as between one man and one woman, but she also voted against a bill that would have prevented same-sex couples from adopting. [31] She was one of four Republicans in the state house to vote in favor of giving domestic partner rights to unmarried gay and straight couples. [32] After same-sex marriage was legalized in Arizona, Reagan said that "[it] should be a proud day for Arizona as we celebrate equality." [33] She was given a 100% rating by Equality Arizona which supports same-sex marriage and other LGBT rights. [34] Representing the more conservative perspective, the Center for Arizona Policy, which opposes same-sex marriage and civil unions, gave Reagan a rating of 92% in 2012, her highest score, and a rating of 54% in 2008, her lowest score. [21]

Reflecting her positions on gun issues, she was rated 79% by the National Rifle Association which advocates in favor of gun ownership rights. [35] [36] In 2011, she had an A rating from the NRA. [37] She voted to allow guns in certain public buildings, including on college campuses, and to legalize the display of a firearm for self-defense. [38]

On education, Reagan voted against banning Common Core Standards. [39] She also voted to end affirmative action in education. [40]

She received a score of 38% in 2008 from Border Action Network, an organization supporting pro-immigration policies. [21] Michele Reagan had also voted for SB1070, the controversial immigration law passed in Arizona meant to oppose illegal immigration and tighten enforcement. [41] She joined Democrats to oppose a bill that would have defined and restricted Arizona citizenship. [42] [43] She voted to make English the official language of the state, and she voted against issuing separate birth certificates to non-citizens as well as against requiring proof of citizenship for some benefits. [44] In 2018, Arizona faced a lawsuit over its requirement that voters show proof of citizenship to register to vote; as part of a settlement, Reagan agreed to a deal that requires proof of citizenship to vote in state elections but does not require proof of citizenship to vote in federal elections in accordance with federal law. [45]

Elections

In 2016, Reagan proposed a bill in the Arizona Legislature ostensibly simplify elections, which would allow dark money groups to spend twice as much money on ballot measures as legally allowed, and allow nonprofit groups to spend more on elections. [46] After the Trump administration requested that states provide voter information for a commission on voter fraud, Michele Reagan "said [on July 3] she is rejecting the Trump administration's request for extensive voter information, saying it isn't in the state's best interest." [47]

Controversy

In 2016 Reagan came under scrutiny for failing to mail out as many as a half million publicity pamphlets as required by Arizona law in connection with an election, an investigation which is ongoing. [48]

Personal life

Michele Reagan and her husband, David, currently reside in Scottsdale. She is a member of Valley Presbyterian Church in Paradise Valley, a congregation of the Presbyterian Church (USA). [49] She has no relation to the family of Ronald Reagan.

Electoral history

Arizona House of Representatives District 8 Republican Primary Election, 2002
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan 6,348 24.20
Republican Colette Rosati 4,722 18.00
Republican Ron McCullagh 4,554 17.36
Republican Robert Ditchey 4,004 15.26
Republican Scott Steingard 3,459 13.19
Republican Kathleen Gillis 3,146 11.99
Arizona House of Representatives District 8 Election, 2002
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan 33,251 39.68
Republican Colette Rosati 25,607 30.56
Democratic Ginny Chin 24,946 29.77
Arizona House of Representatives District 8 Republican Primary Election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan (inc.) 13,890 45.88
Republican Colette Rosati (inc.) 9,199 30.38
Republican Royce Flora 7,186 23.74
Arizona House of Representatives District 8 Election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan (inc.) 50,806 34.44
Republican Colette Rosati (inc.) 41,496 28.13
Democratic Nancy Stein 28,480 19.31
Democratic Nancy Buel 26,737 18.12
Arizona House of Representatives District 8 Republican Primary Election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan (inc.) 11,302 35.81
Republican John Kavanagh 7,979 25.28
Republican James Burke 5,712 18.10
Republican Carolyn Schoenrock 3,854 12.21
Republican Travis Junion 2,717 8.61
Arizona House of Representatives District 8 Election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan (inc.) 40,118 32.89
Republican John Kavanagh 35,260 28.90
Democratic Stephanie Rimmer 26,684 21.87
Democratic William Sandberg 19,931 16.34
Arizona House of Representatives District 8 Election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan (inc.) 54,780 38.29
Republican John Kavanagh (inc.) 50,507 35.30
Democratic Stephanie Rimmer 37,793 26.41
Arizona State Senate District 8 Election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan 52,532 69.95
Democratic Stuart Turnansky 22,570 30.05
Arizona Secretary of State Republican Primary Election, 2014
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan 217,741 43.24
Republican Justin Pierce 174,422 34.63
Republican Wil Cardon 111,444 22.13
Arizona Secretary of State Election, 2014
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michele Reagan 779,226 52.22
Democratic Terry Goddard 712,918 47.78
Arizona Secretary of State Republican Primary Election, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Gaynor 326,279 67.30
Republican Michele Reagan (inc.) 158,538 32.70

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=768000
  2. ^ https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=512920
  3. ^ https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=47471
  4. ^ https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=323385
  5. ^ "Michele Reagan struggles to explain 'birther bill' vote". AZ Central. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  6. ^ "GOP Candidate Refuses To Explain Why She Voted For 'Birther Bill'". Huffington Post. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  7. ^ "Sen. Steve Montenegro jumps into race for Arizona secretary of state". azcentral. Retrieved 2018-02-05.
  8. ^ "Roberts: Former Senate president may challenge Michele Reagan". azcentral. Retrieved 2018-02-05.
  9. ^ "Michele Reagan behind challenger in Arizona GOP secretary of state poll". KTAR.com. 2018-07-31. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  10. ^ "Arizona Primary Election Results". Retrieved 2018-08-29.
  11. ^ "Arizona elections: What you need to know about the Republican race for secretary of state". azcentral. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  12. ^ "Does Michele Reagan deserve another term as secretary of state? 5 things you need to know". azcentral. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  13. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2017-07-04.
  14. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  15. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  16. ^ "Michele Reagan wins Arizona's race for secretary of state - KTAR.com". KTAR.com. 2014-11-04. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  17. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2017-07-04.
  18. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2017-07-04.
  19. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  20. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2017-07-04.
  21. ^ a b c "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  22. ^ "Gov. Brewer endorses Reagan for secretary of state". azcentral. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  23. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  24. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  25. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  26. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  27. ^ a b "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  28. ^ "Legislative Scorecard for the 2011 Arizona Legislative Session" (PDF). advocatesaz.org. 2011. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  29. ^ "Vote Detail For HB2036 - Third Reading Referral 1 - HTML 3.0 Version". www.azleg.gov. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  30. ^ Services, Howard Fischer, Capitol Media. "Arizona Senate votes down contraception bill". East Valley Tribune. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  31. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  32. ^ Services, Howard Fischer Capitol Media. "Bid for ban of AZ gay marriages is derailed". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  33. ^ Nintzel, Jim. "Proof of Evolution". Tucson Weekly. Retrieved 2017-07-30.
  34. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  35. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2017-07-04.
  36. ^ "About Us". 2014-05-10. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  37. ^ "National Rifle Association ratings of current lawmakers:". Arizona Daily Sun. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  38. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  39. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  40. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  41. ^ "Sec'y of State candidate gets endorsement from SB 1070 co-author". azcentral. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  42. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  43. ^ Services, Howard Fischer, Capitol Media. "Arizona Senate votes down Pearce's illegal immigration legislation". East Valley Tribune. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  44. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  45. ^ "Arizona Settles Voter Registration Lawsuit". KJZZ. 2018-06-04. Retrieved 2018-07-31.
  46. ^ Press, Associated (4 March 2016). "Arizona bill quietly loosens dark money rules". Retrieved 6 July 2017.
  47. ^ "Arizona to oppose handing over voter information to Trump commission". azcentral. Retrieved 2017-07-04.
  48. ^ "Reagan election pamphlet probe for Props. 123 and 124 drags into 10th month". Retrieved 6 July 2017.
  49. ^ "House Member". www.azleg.gov. Retrieved 2018-08-13.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Ken Bennett
Secretary of State of Arizona
2015–present
Succeeded by
Katie Hobbs
Elect