Maryland Route 702 Article

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Maryland Route 702 marker

Maryland Route 702
Southeast Boulevard
Route information
Maintained by MDSHA
Length4.17 mi [1] (6.71 km)
Existed1974–present
Major junctions
West end I-695 near Rosedale
  MD 150 in Essex
East endBack River Neck Road in Essex
Location
Counties Baltimore
Highway system
MD 701 MD 703

Maryland Route 702 (MD 702) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Maryland. Known as Southeast Boulevard, the state highway runs 4.17 miles (6.71 km) from Interstate 695 (I-695) in Rosedale east to Back River Neck Road near Essex. MD 702 is a controlled-access spur that serves Essex in southeastern Baltimore County. The state highway was constructed as a freeway from I-695 to Old Eastern Avenue east of MD 150 in the early 1970s. MD 702 was extended as a divided highway to its present terminus around 1990.

Route description

View north from the south end of MD 702 at Back River Neck Road in Essex

MD 702 begins at a directional-T interchange with I-695 (Baltimore Beltway) near Rosedale. I-695 toward Towson and MD 702 toward Essex form the mainline of the interchange while I-695 toward Glen Burnie forms the stem of the T. Within the interchange, MD 702 crosses over Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and Northeast Creek, a tributary of the Back River that receives Stemmers Run. The state highway heads southeast into Essex as a four-lane freeway through a partial cloverleaf interchange with MD 150 (Eastern Boulevard). There is no direct access from northbound MD 702 to MD 150 or from MD 150 to southbound MD 702. The missing movements are made via MD 702's intersection with Old Eastern Avenue, where the freeway ends. [1] [2]

MD 702 continues southeast as a six-lane controlled-access boulevard on which trucks heavier than 5 short tons (4,500 kg) are prohibited. [3] The state highway passes between residential subdivisions, crosses Deep Creek, and passes under a pedestrian walkway before reaching Middleborough Road, where the highway reduces to four lanes. MD 702 meets Hyde Park Road at a roundabout and intersects Turkey Point Road before reaching its eastern terminus. The roadway continues south as Back River Neck Road, a two-lane county road that leads through a forested area to Rocky Point Park and Essex Skypark at the southern end of Back River Neck. Back River Neck Road splits from the highway in the other direction back toward the center of Essex. [1] [2]

MD 702 is a part of the National Highway System as a principal arterial for its entire length. [1] [4]

History

Much of MD 702 parallels Back River Neck Road, which was originally the north–south portion of the Back River Neck Turnpike; the east–west segment followed Eastern Avenue from the Back River to the Middle River. [5] The MD 702 designation was originally applied to Jones Bridge Road from US 240 (now MD 355) east along the southern edge of the National Naval Medical Center complex in Bethesda by 1946 and removed by 1958. [6] [7] The Southeast Freeway was one of three freeways—with the Windlass Freeway and Patapsco Freeway—planned to be built in southeastern Baltimore County as extensions or supplements to the Baltimore Beltway. The Southeast Freeway would head southeast from the Beltway's terminus at US 40 in Rosedale through Essex; the freeway would intersect the Windlass Freeway at what is today MD 702's junction with I-695. [8] By 1972, MD 702 was assigned to the Southeast Freeway, which was under construction from the Windlass Freeway to Old Eastern Avenue. [9] [10] MD 702 was completed in 1974 from the Windlass Freeway east to Old Eastern Avenue. [11] MD 702's interchange with the Beltway was planned to accommodate an eastward extension of the Windlass Freeway as late as 1981. [12] Construction on MD 702's boulevard extension was underway in 1989 and completed in January 1990. [13] [14] The state highway's roundabout at Hyde Park Road was installed in 2005. [15]

Junction list

The entire route is in Baltimore County.

Locationmi [1]kmDestinationsNotes
Rosedale0.000.00 I-695 (Baltimore Beltway) – Towson, Glen BurnieExit 36 (I-695); western terminus
Essex1.702.74 MD 150 (Eastern Boulevard) – Essex, ChasePartial cloverleaf interchange; no direct access from westbound MD 702 to MD 150 or from MD 150 to eastbound MD 702
2.053.30Old Eastern Avenue
3.425.50Hyde Park Road Roundabout
4.176.71Back River Neck RoadEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2013). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2011-05-27.
  2. ^ a b Google (2011-05-27). "Maryland Route 702" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 2011-05-27.
  3. ^ "Maryland Route Restrictions" (PDF). Maryland State Highway Administration. 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
  4. ^ National Highway System: Washington, DC-VA-MD (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. October 1, 2012. Retrieved 2015-05-15.
  5. ^ Clark, William Bullock (1899). Report on the Highways of Maryland. Baltimore: Maryland Geological Survey. pp. 218&ndash, 220. Retrieved 2011-05-26.
  6. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1946). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1946–1947 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission.
  7. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1958). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission.
  8. ^ Maryland State Roads Commission (1970). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Roads Commission.
  9. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1972). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration.
  10. ^ "NBI Structure Number: 100000030267013". National Bridge Inventory. Retrieved 2011-05-31.
  11. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1974). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration.
  12. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1981). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map) (1981–1982 ed.). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration.
  13. ^ Maryland State Highway Administration (1989). Maryland: Official Highway Map (Map). Baltimore: Maryland State Highway Administration.
  14. ^ "Major Transportation Milestones in the Baltimore Region Since 1940" (PDF). Baltimore Metropolitan Council. 2005-12-01. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-12-27. Retrieved 2010-05-31.
  15. ^ Highway Information Services Division (December 31, 2005). Highway Location Reference. Maryland State Highway Administration. Retrieved 2011-05-31.

External links

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata