State Treasurer of Wisconsin Article

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Treasurer of Wisconsin
Privy Seal of Wisconsin.svg
Seal of the Executive Branch
Incumbent
Matt Adamczyk

since January 3, 2015
Term lengthFour years, no term limits
Inaugural holder Jairus C. Fairchild
FormationJune 7, 1848 (1848-06-07)
Salary$69,936
Website http://www.statetreasury.wisconsin.gov

The State Treasurer of Wisconsin is an officer of the executive branch of the government of the U.S. state of Wisconsin.

Thirty-five individuals have held the office of State Treasurer. The current treasurer is Matt Adamczyk, a Republican. Adamczyk did not seek reelection in the 2018 election, and will be succeeded by Democrat Sarah Godlewski in January, 2019.

Election and term of office

The state treasurer is elected on Election Day in November, and takes office on the first Monday of the next January. [1] There is no limit to the number of terms a state treasurer may hold. From 1848 to 1968, the state treasurer was elected to a two-year term in the November general election. Since 1970, following ratification of a constitutional amendment in April 1967, the state treasurer has been elected to a four-year term.

In the event of a vacancy in the office of the state treasurer, the Governor of Wisconsin may appoint a replacement to fill the remainder of the term. The state treasurer may be removed from office through an impeachment trial. [2] They may also choose to resign from office.

Powers and duties

The State Treasurer is the state's chief banker and certified copies of deeds, bonds, and documents are filed in the treasurer's office. The State Treasurer is also a member of the Wisconsin Board of Commissioners of Public Lands. [3]

Reduction of powers and office dissolution attempts

Since the 1990s, the duties of the state treasurer have gradually been eliminated or shifted to other state agencies. 1995 Wisconsin Act 27 eliminated the office’s securities section, which had the responsibility of safekeeping of securities purchased by the State of Wisconsin Investment Board. 1997 Wisconsin Act 27 transferred the Division of Trust Lands and Investment to the Wisconsin Department of Administration. 2003 Wisconsin Act 33 transferred almost all of the cash management functions of the state treasurer’s office to the Department of Administration. 2011 Wisconsin Act 32 transferred the state's version of a 529 plan, known as EdVest, to the Department of Administration. The act also transferred the Local Government Investment Pool and management services functions to the Department of Administration. 2013 Wisconsin Act 20 transferred the state treasurer’s Unclaimed Property Program to the Wisconsin Department of Revenue.

On October 27, 2015, the Wisconsin State Assembly approved an amendment to the Wisconsin Constitution to remove the state treasurer's office, Assembly Joint Resolution 5 (AJR 5), with 63 "yea" votes and 33 "nay" votes. The Wisconsin State Senate approved AJR 5 on January 20, 2016. The first approval of the amendment was enrolled on March 15, 2016.

Because this measure was approved by both chambers of the Wisconsin State Legislature, the Wisconsin Elimination of State Treasurer Amendment was placed on the 2018 spring general election ballot on April 3, 2018. [4] The referendum was defeated, with 62% of voters statewide choosing to retain the office with a "no" vote against amending the constitution to eliminate the office. [5]

List of state treasurers

Number of State Treasurers of Wisconsin by party affiliation
Party Treasurers
Republican 23
Democratic 9
Progressive 1
None 1

This is a list of State Treasurers of Wisconsin.

   Democratic    Republican    Progressive

# State Treasurer Party Took office Left office [note 1]
1 Jairus C. Fairchild Democratic June 7, 1848 [6] January 5, 1852
2 Edward H. Janssen [note 2] Democratic January 5, 1852 [6] January 7, 1856
3 Charles Kuehn Democratic January 7, 1856 [6] January 4, 1858
4 Samuel D. Hastings Republican January 4, 1858 [6] January 1, 1866
5 William E. Smith Republican January 1, 1866 [6] January 3, 1870
6 Henry Baetz Republican January 3, 1870 [6] January 5, 1874
7 Ferdinand Kuehn Democratic January 5, 1874 [6] January 7, 1878
8 Richard Guenther Republican January 7, 1878 [6] January 2, 1882
9 Edward C. McFetridge Republican January 2, 1882 [6] January 3, 1887
10 Henry B. Harshaw Republican January 3, 1887 [6] January 5, 1891
11 John Hunner Democratic January 5, 1891 [6] January 7, 1895
12 Sewell A. Peterson Republican January 7, 1895 [6] January 2, 1899
13 James O. Davidson Republican January 2, 1899 [6] January 5, 1903
14 John J. Kempf [note 3] Republican January 5, 1903 July 30, 1904 [8]
15 Thomas M. Purtell [note 4] Republican July 30, 1904 [8] January 2, 1905
16 John J. Kempf Republican January 2, 1905 [6] January 7, 1907
17 Andrew H. Dahl Republican January 7, 1907 [6] January 6, 1913
18 Henry Johnson Republican January 6, 1913 [6] January 1, 1923
19 Solomon Levitan Republican January 1, 1923 [6] January 2, 1933
20 Robert K. Henry Democratic January 2, 1933 [9] January 4, 1937
21 Solomon Levitan Progressive January 4, 1937 [10] January 2, 1939
22 John M. Smith [note 5] Republican January 2, 1939 [11] August 17, 1947 [8]
vacant August 17, 1947 August 19, 1947
23 John L. Sonderegger [note 4] [note 6] Republican August 19, 1947 [8] September 30, 1948 [8]
vacant September 30, 1948 October 1, 1948
24 Clyde M. Johnston [note 7] none October 1, 1948 [8] January 3, 1949
25 Warren R. Smith [note 5] Republican January 3, 1949 [12] December 4, 1957 [8]
vacant December 4, 1957 December 5, 1957
26 Dena A. Smith [note 4] Republican December 5, 1957 [8] January 5, 1959
27 Eugene M. Lamb Democratic January 5, 1959 [13] January 2, 1961
28 Dena A. Smith [note 5] Republican January 2, 1961 [14] February 20, 1968 [8]
vacant February 20, 1968 February 21, 1968
29 Harold W. Clemens [note 4] Republican February 21, 1968 [8] January 4, 1971
30 Charles P. Smith Democratic January 4, 1971 [15] January 7, 1991
31 Cathy Zeuske Republican January 7, 1991 [16] January 3, 1995
32 Jack Voight Republican January 3, 1995 [17] January 3, 2007
33 Dawn Marie Sass Democratic January 3, 2007 [18] January 3, 2011
34 Kurt W. Schuller Republican January 3, 2011 January 5, 2015
35 Matt Adamczyk Republican January 5, 2015 Incumbent

Notes

  1. ^ When there is no evidence to the contrary, it is assumed that state treasurers left office the same day their successors were sworn in.
  2. ^ Contermporary newspaper accounts indicate that the second State Treasurer's surname was "Jansson"; [7] recent editions of the Wisconsin Blue Books, however, list his surname as "Jansen". [8]
  3. ^ Failed to give the required bond.
  4. ^ a b c d Appointed to fill vacancy.
  5. ^ a b c Died in office.
  6. ^ Resigned to become state insurance commissioner.
  7. ^ Appointed from staff.

See also

References

  1. ^ Barish, Lawrence S. (ed.) (2007). "Chapter 3: Wisconsin Constitution (Article XIII)". State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2007–2008 (PDF). Madison, Wisconsin: Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau. p. 234. ISBN  978-0-9752820-2-1. Retrieved 2008-05-10.[ permanent dead link]
  2. ^ Barish, Lawrence S. (ed.) (2007). "Chapter 3: Wisconsin Constitution (Article VII)". State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2007–2008 (PDF). Madison, Wisconsin: Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau. p. 218. ISBN  978-0-9752820-2-1. Retrieved 2008-05-10.[ permanent dead link]
  3. ^ http://bcpl.wisconsin.gov
  4. ^ Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau, "2015 Enrolled Joint Resolution 7: Constitutional Amendment Approved on First Consideration to Eliminate the Office of the State Treasurer," June 2016
  5. ^ "Wisconsin voters choose to keep state treasurer's office". Wisconsin State Journal. 4 April 2018. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Anderson, William J. (1929). William A. Anderson, ed. The Wisconsin blue book, 1929. Madison, Wisconsin: Democrat Printing Company. p. 148. Retrieved 2008-06-10.
  7. ^ "EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE: "Except these Bonds"" (PDF). Daily Free Democrat. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. January 20, 1852. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-08-25.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Barish, Lawrence S. (ed.) (2007). "Chapter 8: Statistical Information on Wisconsin". State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2007–2008 (PDF). Madison, Wisconsin: Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau. pp. 722&ndash, 723. ISBN  978-0-9752820-2-1. Archived from the original on 2011-08-11. Retrieved 2008-06-06.
  9. ^ "SCHMEDEMAN IS MADE GOVERNOR" (PDF). Ironwood Daily Globe. Ironwood, Michigan. January 2, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  10. ^ "New Administrations Started" (PDF). Oshkosh Daily Northwestern. Oshkosh, Wisconsin. January 4, 1937. p. 6. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  11. ^ "Gov. Julius P. Heil Takes Office" (PDF). The Sheboygan Press. Sheboygan, Wisconsin. January 2, 1939. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  12. ^ "Rennebohm Inaugurated for Own Term as Governor" (PDF). Waukesha Daily Freeman. Waukesha, Wisconsin. January 3, 1949. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  13. ^ "Gaylord Nelson Becomes State's 34th Governor" (PDF). Stevens Point Daily Journal. Stevens Point, Wisconsin. January 5, 1959. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  14. ^ "State Officers Inaugurated" (PDF). Wisconsin State Journal. Madison, Wisconsin. January 3, 1961. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  15. ^ "Lucey Hopes to Bridge Troubled State Waters" (PDF). Wisconsin State Journal. Madison, Wisconsin. January 5, 1971. pp. 1&ndash, 2. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  16. ^ "Thompson takes oath, praises school choice" (PDF). Ironwood Daily Globe. Ironwood, Michigan. January 8, 1991. p. 7. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  17. ^ "TWO CAPITOLS FEEL CHANGE IN THE AIR". St. Paul Pioneer Press. St. Paul, Minnesota. January 4, 1995. p. 1A. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  18. ^ "At inauguration, Doyle keeps focus on health care, schools; Legislative leaders make bipartisan pledges after Capitol ceremonies". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. January 4, 2007. p. B1. Retrieved 2008-08-25.