Justin Olson Article

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Justin Olson
Justin Olson by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Arizona Corporation Commissioner
Assumed office
October 17, 2017
Preceded by Doug Little
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 25th [1] district
In office
January 14, 2013 – January 9, 2017
Succeeded by Michelle Udall
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 19th district
In office
January 10, 2011 – January 14, 2013
Serving with Kirk Adams
Preceded by Rich Crandall
Personal details
Born Mesa, Arizona
Nationality American
Political party Republican
ResidenceMesa, Arizona
Alma mater Arizona State University
Website votejustinolson.com

Justin Olson [2] (born in Mesa, Arizona) is an American politician who currently serves on the Arizona Corporation Commission. Olson is a former member of the Arizona House of Representatives representing District 25 from January 14, 2013 until 2017. Olson previously served consecutively from January 10, 2011 until January 14, 2013 in the District 19 seat. He is a member of the Republican Party.

Education

Olson earned his BS and MBA from Arizona State University.

Olson is a tax analyst who worked for the University of Phoenix before his appointment to the Corporation Commission. [3]

Corporation Commission

Justin Olson sworn into office, as Corporation Commissioner.

On October 17, 2017, Governor Doug Ducey appointed Olson to fill a vacancy on the Arizona Corporation Commission.

Elections

  • 2016 Olson ran in the Republican primary for the 5th Congressional district, losing to Andy Biggs.
  • 2014 Olson and Russell Bowers defeated Haydee Dawson, Michelle Udall and Jerry Walker in the Republican primary. Olson and Bowers defeated David Butler, Sheila Ogea, and Libertarian Michael Kielsky in the general election. [4]
  • 2012 Redistricted to District 25, and with incumbent Republican Representatives Peggy Judd leaving the Legislature and David Stevens redistricted to District 14, Olson and Justin Pierce were unopposed in the August 28, 2012 Republican Primary; Pierce placed first, and Olson placed second with 18,392 votes; [5] Pierce and Olson won the three-way November 6, 2012 General election, with Pierce taking the first seat and Olson taking the second seat with 48,335 votes against Democratic nominee David Butler. [6]
  • 2010 When incumbent Republican Representative Rich Crandall ran for Arizona Senate and left a District 19 seat open, Olson ran alongside incumbent Representative Kirk Adams in the three-way August 24, 2010 Republican Primary, placing first with 12,386 votes; [7] in the three-way November 2, 2010 General election, Adams took the first seat, and Olson took the second seat with 31,583 votes against Democratic nominee Kit Filbey. [8]

References

  1. ^ "Justin Olson". Phoenix, Arizona: Arizona State Legislature. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  2. ^ "Justin Olson's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  3. ^ http://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/energy/2017/10/17/ducey-appoints-justin-olson-utility-regulator-replace-doug-little/773333001/
  4. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2014 General Election November 4, 2014" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Retrieved March 18, 2016.
  5. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 Primary Election August 28, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  6. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 General Election November 6, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  7. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 Primary Election - August 24, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  8. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2010 General Election - November 2, 2010" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2013.

External links