Interstate 380 (Pennsylvania) Article

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Interstate 380 marker

Interstate 380
I-380 highlighted in red
Route information
Auxiliary route of I-80
Maintained by PennDOT
Length28.256 mi [1] (45.474 km)
Major junctions
South end I-80 in Tunkhannock Township
 
North end I-81 / I-84 / US 6 in Dunmore
Location
Counties Monroe, Wayne, Lackawanna
Highway system
PA 378 PA 380
PA 81 I-81E.svg PA 82

Interstate 380 (abbreviated I-380) is a spur highway in northeast Pennsylvania that connects Interstate 80 with Interstate 81 and Interstate 84. The northern terminus of I-380 is at I-81 and U.S. Route 6 (US 6) in Dunmore; the southern terminus is in Tunkhannock Township at the junction with Interstate 80. The entire length of the highway is 28.2 miles (45.4 km).

Route description

Interstate 380 northbound merge with Interstate 84 in Roaring Brook Township, southeast of Scranton.

I-380 begins at an interchange with I-80 in the northeastern corner of Tunkhannock Township in Monroe County, heading north as a four-lane freeway. The road soon crosses into Tobyhanna Township and runs through forested areas in the Pocono Mountains with nearby development, passing west of the Kalahari Resort and Convention Center. The highway comes to an interchange with PA 940 to the west of Pocono Summit. I-380 continues north and crosses into Coolbaugh Township, where it curves northwest and runs through dense forests. The road passes through part of Pennsylvania State Game Lands Number 127 before it comes to a northbound exit and southbound entrance at PA 423 near Tobyhanna. A short distance later, the highway comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance serving the northern terminus of PA 611. Following this interchange, I-380 passes to the southwest of the Tobyhanna Army Depot before it runs along the border between Pennsylvania State Game Lands Number 127 to the southwest and Gouldsboro State Park to the northeast. Farther northwest, the highway comes to a diamond interchange with the southern termini of PA 435 and PA 507 near Gouldsboro. [2] [3]

Immediately after the PA 435/PA 507 interchange, I-380 passes through a small corner of Lehigh Township in Wayne County before it crosses the Lehigh River into Clifton Township in Lackawanna County. [2] [4] [5] The highway continues through forested areas and curves to the north, passing a northbound weigh station and crossing into Covington Township. The freeway runs past a southbound weigh station and bends northwest again. The route curves back to the north into a mix of fields and woods and reaches a diamond interchange with PA 307. Past this interchange, I-380 curves north into the borough of Moscow and coming to a southbound exit and northbound entrance at PA 690. The roadway curves northwest and passes through a corner of Spring Brook Township before entering Roaring Brook Township, where it runs through forests with nearby development and comes to an interchange with I-84. [2] [5]

At this point, I-84 and I-380 become concurrent, with the freeway using I-84's exit numbers and mileposts. The two routes continue north through forested areas in the Moosic Mountains, entering Dunmore and coming to a bridge over Roaring Brook and a Delaware–Lackawanna Railroad line. After this bridge, the highway curves northwest and comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance with the northern terminus of PA 435. The freeway widens to six lanes and winds through the mountains before it comes to an interchange with Tigue Street, at which point it runs past commercial development. A short distance later, I-84 and I-380 both come to their termini at an interchange with I-81 and US 6, with the freeway merging onto northbound I-81/westbound US 6. [2] [5]

History

Prior to receiving its current designation, the planned corridor of I-380 had several other designations. When the initial numbers for the Interstate System were assigned in 1957, the Scranton–New York route (including the current I-380) was designated I-82. [6] This changed the next year, and the Scranton-Stroudsburg connection became I-81S, a spur of I-81. [7]

In 1961, construction began on a short section of the route between what is now Exit 2 for PA 435 (then part of U.S. Route 611) and its northern terminus at I-81 outside of Scranton. [8] This section was opened in 1962 as part of US 611. [8] In 1964, the designation of the proposed road was changed again to Interstate 81E and construction began on the section between the southern terminus at Interstate 80 and Exit 3 for PA 940 near Pocono Manor. [8] This section was built at the same time as the connecting section of I-80 and both opened in 1965. [8]

In December 1966, it was announced bids were to occur soon to build a portion of the highway between Pocono Manor in Tobyhanna Township and Coolbaugh Township. [9] On December 30, 1966, bids were made to build a section of I-81E in Coolbaugh and Tobyhanna townships. [10] In February 1967, construction was planned for a section of highway in Coolbaugh Township between Tobyhanna and the border with Lackawanna County. [11] On April 21, 1967, the state announced bidding would take place to build a section of I-81E in Monroe County on May 12. [12] The state announced on June 9, 1967 that bidding would take place on June 23 to construct a section of the highway in Covington Township. [13] The section of I-81E between the PA 940 interchange in Pocono Manor and US 611/PA 423 at Tobyhanna was projected to open in fall 1968, and construction of the highway between Tobyhanna and Elmhurst was underway by 1968. [14] [15]

On November 21, 1969, the section of I-81E between PA 507 in Gouldsboro and PA 307 in Daleville opened to traffic. [16] By 1970, the road between PA 307 in Daleville and US 611 southeast of Dunmore was under design. [17]

In 1967, construction on the road was restarted on a 17-mile (27 km) southern section from PA 940 to PA 423 and PA 507 to the Dorantown Road overpass, and, in 1968, was expanded to the sections from PA 423 to PA 507 and the Dorantown Road overpass to PA 307. [8] This section opened in 1970 with US 611 multiplexed onto the portion between Exit 8 (now PA 611) and Exit 13 (PA 507) adjacent to Gouldsboro State Park. [8]

On June 20, 1972, the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) approved renumbering I-81E as I-380, along with extending I-84 concurrent with I-380 from Elmhurst Township north to I-81. [18] The renumbering was done in order to avoid the confusion of I-81E with the connecting I-80 and I-81 designations. The new I-380 designation and extended I-84 would take effect in spring 1973, with the new signs to be installed by June of that year. [19] In 1973, the northern section was upgraded to Interstate standards. [8] In 1974 and 1975, work commenced on the final sections from PA 307 to the Shutters Road underpass and Shutters Road to PA 435, respectively. [8] This included an interchange with Interstate 84 was opened to traffic in 1976 as an east-west highway with mileage-based exit numbers. [8] These mileage-based numbers were scrapped by 1977 and replaced with eight sequential numbers beginning in Scranton. Mileage-based exit numbers were revived in 2001 when the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation renumbered its Interstate System exit numbers. I-380 was redesignated as a north–south highway so that its exit numbers would commence from I-80 in the south. [8]

Exit list

CountyLocationmi [1]kmOld exit [20]New exit [20]DestinationsNotes
Monroe TunkhannockJackson
township line
0.0000.0001 I-80 – Hazleton, StroudsburgI-80 exit 293; southern terminus; southbound ramps divide near Mile 0, and are signed as exits 1A (west) & 1B (east).
Tobyhanna Township2.5314.07383 PA 940 – Mount Pocono, Pocono Pines
Coolbaugh Township7.63012.27978 PA 423 – TobyhannaNorthbound exit and southbound entrance
8.22213.23278 PA 611 south to PA 423 – TobyhannaSouthbound exit and northbound entrance; northern terminus of PA 611
13.04320.991613 PA 435 / PA 507 north – GouldsboroSouthern terminus of PA 435 and PA 507
Wayne
No major junctions
Lackawanna Covington Township19.53031.430520 PA 307 – Daleville, Moscow
Moscow21.03333.849422 PA 690 – MoscowSouthbound exit and northbound entrance; other movements use Exit 20.
Roaring Brook Township24.45239.35224 I-84 east – MilfordI-380 north merges with I-84 west; I-84 exit numbers are used until I-81.
Dunmore26.28142.29522 PA 435 south – ElmhurstSouthbound left exit and northbound entrance; northern terminus of PA 435
27.29343.92411Tigue Street
28.25645.474 US 6 east – CarbondaleNorthbound exit and southbound entrance
28.25645.474 I-81 north / US 6 west to PA 347 – BinghamtonNorthbound exit and southbound entrance, right lanes
28.25645.474 I-81 south – Wilkes-BarreNorthbound exit and southbound entrance, left lanes
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also

References

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata
  1. ^ a b Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2015). Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams (Report) (2015 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 30, 2015.[ permanent dead link]
  2. ^ a b c d Google (October 23, 2015). "overview of Interstate 380" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved October 23, 2015.
  3. ^ Monroe County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2015.[ permanent dead link]
  4. ^ Wayne County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2014. Retrieved October 14, 2015.[ permanent dead link]
  5. ^ a b c Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2014. Retrieved October 23, 2015.[ permanent dead link]
  6. ^ Official Route Numbering for the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways (Map). American Association of State Highway Officials. August 14, 1957. Retrieved January 3, 2017.
  7. ^ Official Route Numbering for the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways (Map). American Association of State Highway Officials. June 27, 1958. Retrieved January 3, 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Jeffrey J. Kitsko. Interstate 380 at Pennsylvania Highways. 17 December 2012. Retrieved 5 September 2013.
  9. ^ "$29 million highway list includes local projects". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. December 10, 1966. p. 8. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ "Highway bids let for Monroe and Pike". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. December 31, 1966. p. 3. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ Bartlett, Robert G. (February 25, 1967). "Bartlett sees progress". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. p. 33. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ "Road, Bridge Improvement Are Planned". Somerset Daily American. April 21, 1967. p. 2. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  13. ^ "To Receive Road Bids on June 23". The Plain Speaker. Hazleton, PA. Associated Press. June 10, 1967. p. 3. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  14. ^ "Routes 84, 81E mark progress". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. January 29, 1968. p. 3. Retrieved January 4, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ "Highway link nearing". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. May 22, 1968. p. 4. Retrieved January 4, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  16. ^ "Pocono Expressway links opened to public". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. November 28, 1969. p. 15. Retrieved January 9, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ "21 miles of Rt. 81 complete". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. February 11, 1970. p. 5. Retrieved January 24, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  18. ^ U.S. Route Numbering Subcommittee (June 20, 1972). "U.S. Route Numbering Subcommittee Agenda Showing Action Taken by the Executive Committee" (PDF) (Report). Washington, DC: American Association of State Highway Officials. p. 425. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Wikimedia Commons.
  19. ^ "Interstate 81-E renamed I-380". The Pocono Record. Stroudsburg, PA. August 28, 1972. p. 11. Retrieved January 3, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  20. ^ a b "Pennsylvania Exit Numbering" (PDF). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 2, 2007.