Indigenous peoples of Arizona Information

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Hopi Nation within Arizona

Hopi Indians [1] have a huge impact in the North central part of Arizona [2] where the majority of their state-allocated land is located. This reservation [3] is one of the largest Native owned pieces of land that is currently in Arizona and is depicted in the image on the right. The Hopi Indians have faced a lot of adversity due to the expansion of American colonies. However, they adapted to and overcame the challenges that were set upon them, in the book "The Changing Physical Environment of the Hopi Indians of Arizona. (Reports of the Awatovi Expedition. No. 1.)," [4] by John Tilton Hack [5], it explains how the Hopi people were able to adjust to the subjugation of new laws and implementations of integration that Americans forced upon them. Along with this, provided insight as to how Native communities were affected by the manifest destiny of colonials and the impact of colonization in general. Another book that specifically entail the Hopi people is "The Hopi-Tewa of Arizona" [6] by Edward P. Dozier [7]. Dozier goes into depth about how within Hopi communities there is a structured form of social constructs and economic activities that are part of daily expectations set by members of the tribe. This suggests that this community had a structured form of government and order that is unheard of during this time of colonial expansion. Overall, American expansion of the West has influenced the way that the Hopi people conduct tribal activities in a negative way because of the newfound limitations placed on them by the overbearing control and hegemony of the United States.


Cliff dwelling located in Montezuma Castle National Monument. The dwelling was built and used by the Pre-Columbian Sinagua people.

Native Americans have inhabited what is now Arizona for thousands of years. It remains a state with one of the largest percentages of Native Americans in the United States, and has the second largest total Native American population of any state. In addition, the majority of the Navajo Nation, the largest Native American reservation in the US, and the entire Tohono O'odham Nation, the second largest, are located in Arizona. Over a quarter of the area of the state is reservation land.

Twenty tribes are members of the Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona (ITCA).

Contemporary peoples native to Arizona

An early hut which served as a home of a Yavapai family.

Yaqui people

Wipukepa, Tolkepaya, and Yavepé (four separate groups)

Prehistoric cultures in Arizona

Hohokam fort known as Sears-Kay Ruin, built C. 1050 AD and located in the foothills of Carefree, Arizona.

Tribal entities in Arizona

Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation
Historic Marker which reads: Gila River Indian Reservation (established 1859) Here the first Indian school was established by the government for the Pimas and Maricopas.

This is a list of all federally recognized tribes in Arizona currently registered with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Links go to the tribes' website or to the ITCA's page for that tribe.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Hopi". Wikipedia. Retrieved 4/17/19. Check date values in: |access-date= ( help)
  2. ^ "Arizona". Wikipedia. Retrieved 4/17/19. Check date values in: |access-date= ( help)
  3. ^ "List of Indian reservations in Arizona". Wikipedia. Retrieved 4/17/19. Check date values in: |access-date= ( help)
  4. ^ Hack, John Tilton (1942). he Changing Physical Environment of the Hopi Indians of Arizona. (Reports of the Awatovi Expedition. No. 1.). Cambridge, MA: Museum. line feed character in |title= at position 74 ( help)
  5. ^ "John Tilton Hack". Wikipedia. Retrieved 4/17/19. Check date values in: |access-date= ( help)
  6. ^ Dozier, Edward P. (1954). The Hopi-Tewa of Arizona. Berkeley: U of California: Berkeley: U of Claifornia.
  7. ^ "Edward Dozier". Wikipedia. Retrieved 4/17/19. Check date values in: |access-date= ( help)

External links