Greg Vitali Article

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Greg Vitali
Member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives
from the 166th district
Assumed office
January 5, 1993 [1]
Preceded by Stephen F. Freind
Personal details
Born (1956-06-04) June 4, 1956 (age 62)
Havertown, Pennsylvania
Political party Democratic
Residence Haverford Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania
Website http://www.votevitali.com

Gregory Vitali (born June 4, 1956) is a Democratic member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. He has represented the 166th district since 1993.

Early life and education

Greg Vitali was born on June 4, 1956, in Havertown, Pennsylvania. He attended Saint Joseph's Preparatory School, graduating in 1974. In 1978, he graduated cum laude from Villanova University with a Bachelor of Science in Economics. He received his Law degree from Villanova University School of Law in 1981. [2]

Career

Vitali practiced law in Delaware County for 12 years. In 1993, he was elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives as the first Democratic legislator from the 166th district. He serves on the House Environmental Resource and Energy Committee and has made environmental protection a priority in his role in the state house. Additionally Vitali has taught classes on state and local government at Villanova. [3]

In January 2018, Vitali announced his intention to seek the Democratic nod for the US Congress for the 7th district after Pat Meehan declined to contest the seat. [4] He lost to Mary Gay Scanlon, receiving 5,568 votes or 9.4 percent of the share. [5]

References

  1. ^ "Session of 1993 - 177th of the General Assembly - No. 1" (PDF). Legislative Journal. Pennsylvania House of Representatives. 1993-01-05.
  2. ^ "Meet the Candidate: Greg Vitali". Main Line Media News. 27 October 2012. Retrieved 11 December 2013.
  3. ^ Get to Know Greg
  4. ^ Brelje, Beth (31 January 2018). "State Rep. Greg Vitali wants to represent 7th District in Congress". Reading Eagle. Retrieved 21 March 2018.
  5. ^ "Pennsylvania Primary Election Results". New York Times. May 17, 2018. Retrieved May 29, 2018.

External links