Demographics of Alabama Article

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1800 1,250—    
1810 9,046+623.7%
1820 127,901+1313.9%
1830 309,527+142.0%
1840 590,756+90.9%
1850 771,623+30.6%
1860 964,201+25.0%
1870 996,992+3.4%
1880 1,262,505+26.6%
1890 1,513,401+19.9%
1900 1,828,697+20.8%
1910 2,138,093+16.9%
1920 2,348,174+9.8%
1930 2,646,248+12.7%
1940 2,832,961+7.1%
1950 3,061,743+8.1%
1960 3,266,740+6.7%
1970 3,444,165+5.4%
1980 3,893,888+13.1%
1990 4,040,587+3.8%
2000 4,447,100+10.1%
2010 4,779,736+7.5%
2016 4,863,300+1.7%
Sources: 1910–2010 [1]

Population

The 2010 census estimated Alabama's population at 4,802,740, an increase of 332,636 or 7.5% since 2000. This includes a natural increase of 87,818 (375,808 births minus 287,990 deaths) and a net migration of 73,178 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 30,537 and migration within the country produced a net increase of 42,641.

As of 2005 Alabama had 108,000 foreign-born residents (2.4% of the state population), of which an estimated 24,000 or 22.2% were undocumented immigrants.

In 2006 Alabama had a larger percentage of tobacco smokers than the national average, with 23% of adults smoking. [2]

The racial makeup of the state and comparison to the prior census:

Demographics of Alabama (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 72.56% 26.33% 1.00% 0.89% 0.07%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.48% 0.18% 0.04% 0.02% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 72.14% 26.70% 0.98% 1.02% 0.07%
2005 (Hispanic only) 2.08% 0.17% 0.05% 0.03% 0.01%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 1.90% 3.95% -0.06% 17.43% 4.90%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 1.02% 3.97% -0.55% 17.47% 6.67%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 43.85% 1.05% 11.46% 16.20% -2.17%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

Birth data

Note: Births in table don't add up, because Hispanics are counted both by their ethnicity and by their race, giving a higher overall number.

Live births by Single Race/Ethnicity of Mother
Race 2013 [3] 2014 [4] 2015 [5] 2016 [6]
White: 38,971 (67.0%) 39,578 (66.6%) 39,845 (66.8%) ...
> Non-Hispanic White 35,086 (60.3%) 35,929 (60.5%) 35,826 (60.1%) 34,899 (59.0%)
Black 18,014 (31.0%) 18,417 (31.0%) 18,429 (30.9%) 17,695 (29.9%)
Asian 973 (1.7%) 1,227 (2.1%) 1,193 (2.0%) 986 (1.7%)
American Indian 209 (0.3%) 200 (0.3%) 190 (0.3%) 150 (0.25%)
Hispanic (of any race) 4,002 (6.9%) 4,019 (6.8%) 4,295 (7.2%) 4,580 (7.7%)
Total Alabama 58,167 (100%) 59,422 (100%) 59,657 (100%) 59,151 (100%)
  • Since 2016, data for births of White Hispanic origin are not collected, but included in one Hispanic group; persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

Ancestry

The largest reported ancestry groups in Alabama according to the 2010 census were African American (26.0%), American (17.0%), English (7.8%), Irish (7.7%), German (5.7%), and Scots-Irish (2.0%). 'American' includes those reported as Native American or African American. [7] [8]

Historically, African Americans were brought to Alabama as slaves, in greatest numbers in the cotton-producing plantation region known as the Black Belt. This region remains predominantly African American, where many freedmen settled to work at agriculture after the Civil War. The northern part of the state, originally settled by small farmers with fewer slaves, is predominantly European American. The Port of Mobile, founded by the French and subsequently controlled by England, Spain, and the United States, has long had an ethnically diverse population. It has long served as an entry point for various groups settling in other parts of the state. Those citing " American" ancestry in Alabama are of overwhelmingly English extraction, however most English Americans identify simply as having American ancestry because their roots have been in North America for so long, in many cases since the early sixteen hundreds. Demographers estimate that a minimum of 20–23% of people in Alabama are of predominantly English ancestry and state that the figure is probably much higher. In the 1980 census 1,139,976 people in Alabama cited that they were of English ancestry out of a total state population of 2,824,719 making them 41% of the state at the time and the largest ethnic group. [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] There are also many more people in Alabama of Scots-Irish origins than are self-reported. [14] Many people in Alabama claim Irish ancestry because of the term "Scots-Irish", but most of the time in Alabama this term is used for those with Scottish roots, rather than Irish. [15]

Rankings

Among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, Alabama ranks:

Religion

The religious affiliations of adult people in Alabama are as follows: [16]

Language

As of 2000, 96.7% of Alabama residents age 5 and older speak English at home and 2.2% speak Spanish. German speakers make up only 0.4% of the population, French/ French Creole at 0.3%, and Chinese at 0.1%.

Age and sex

As of 2000, 25.3% of residents of the state were under 18, 6.7% were under 5, and 13.0% were over 65.

51.7% of Alabamians are female and 48.3% are male; there is a surplus of 600,000 women in the age range of 25–44.

See also

References

  1. ^ Resident Population Data. "Resident Population Data – 2010 Census". 2010.census.gov. Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved April 18, 2012.
  2. ^ CDC's STATE System - State Comparison Report Cigarette Use (Adults) – BRFSS[ permanent dead link] for 2006, lists the state as having 23.3% smokers. The national average is 20.8% according to Cigarette Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2006 article in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
  3. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_01.pdf
  4. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_12.pdf
  5. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_01.pdf
  6. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_01.pdf
  7. ^ Data on selected ancestry groups.
  8. ^ 1980 United States Census
  9. ^ Ancestry of the Population by State: 1980 - Table 3
  10. ^ Sharing the Dream: White Males in a Multicultural America by Dominic J. Pulera.
  11. ^ Reynolds Farley, 'The New Census Question about Ancestry: What Did It Tell Us?', Demography, Vol. 28, No. 3 (August 1991), pp. 414, 421.
  12. ^ Stanley Lieberson and Lawrence Santi, 'The Use of Nativity Data to Estimate Ethnic Characteristics and Patterns', Social Science Research, Vol. 14, No. 1 (1985), pp. 44–46.
  13. ^ Stanley Lieberson and Mary C. Waters, 'Ethnic Groups in Flux: The Changing Ethnic Responses of American Whites', Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 487, No. 79 (September 1986), pp. 82–86.
  14. ^ Alabama - Selected Social Characteristics in the United States: 2006-2008
  15. ^ Census 2000 Map – top U.S. ancestries by county
  16. ^ "Religious Landscape Study". Religion and Public Life. Pew Research Center. Retrieved 28 March 2018.

External links