Clark County, Idaho Article

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Clark County, Idaho
Npnht-columbine-birch-creek-07122012-rogermpeterson (7564316590).jpg
Seal of Clark County, Idaho
Seal
Map of Idaho highlighting Clark County
Location in the U.S. state of Idaho
Map of the United States highlighting Idaho
Idaho's location in the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 1, 1919
Named for Sam K. Clark,
state senator & pioneer
Seat Dubois
Largest cityDubois
Area
 • Total1,765 sq mi (4,571 km2)
 • Land1,764 sq mi (4,569 km2)
 • Water1.0 sq mi (3 km2), 0.1%
Population (est.)
 • ( 2017)873
 • Density0.6/sq mi (0.2/km2)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Mountain: UTC−7/ −6
Website www.clark-co.id.gov

Clark County is a rural county in the U.S. state of Idaho; its county seat and largest city is Dubois. [1] [2] As of the 2010 Census, the county had a population of 982, [3] making it the least populous county in the state (trading places with Camas County).

History

Establishment of stage coach stops along the route between Salt Lake City and the Montana mine were established at Beaver Canyon ( named after Beaver Creek (Camas Creek) ) and Dry Creek (now Dubois) in 1864. Originally part of Alturas County, both locations were transferred to Oneida County in 1877. They became part of Bingham County at its creation in 1885. Clark County was also the site of the Battle of Camas Creek during the Nez Perce War which occurred at Camas Meadows near Kilgore on August 20, 1872. The Utah and Northern Railway reached Beaver Canyon in 1879. By the 1890 Census, Beaver Canyon had a population of 216. [4] The settlement relocated to Spencer in 1897. [5] [6]

The majority of Clark County was transferred to Fremont County when it was created in 1893 with the remaining territory being transferred in 1896. [7] By the 1900 Census, 1,199 residents lived in the five precincts of Birch Creek, Dubois, Kilgore, Medicine Lodge, and Spencer. [8] At the 1910 census, the precincts contained 1,095 residents. [9]

Dry Creek was renamed Dubois in 1892 and incorporated prior to 1920 while Spencer was incorporated in 1947. [10]

The county was established 99 years ago in 1919, partitioned from Fremont County by the state legislature; the county division bill was signed by Governor D. W. Davis on February 1. [11] [12] It was named for state senator Sam K. Clark, an early pioneer on Medicine Lodge Creek in the upper Snake River valley. [11] [13] [14]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,765 square miles (4,570 km2), of which 1,764 square miles (4,570 km2) is land and 1.0 square mile (2.6 km2) (0.1%) is water. [15]

The northern border of the county is the Bitterroot Range of the Rocky Mountains, which forms the state line with Montana and is also the continental divide. It is crossed by Interstate 15 over Monida Pass at 6,820 feet (2,080 m) above sea level. Monida Pass also marks an east-west divide between Bitterroot subranges: the Beaverhead Mountains are to the west and the Centennial Mountains are to the east.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19201,886
19301,122−40.5%
19401,005−10.4%
1950918−8.7%
1960915−0.3%
1970741−19.0%
19807987.7%
1990762−4.5%
20001,02234.1%
2010982−3.9%
Est. 2017873 [16]−11.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]
1790-1960 [18] 1900-1990 [19]
1990-2000 [20] 2010-2013 [3]

2000 census

As of the census [21] of 2000, there were 1,022 people, 340 households, and 257 families residing in the county. The population density was 1 person per square mile (0/km²). There were 521 housing units at an average density of 0 per square mile (0/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 74.17% White, 0.10% Black or African American, 0.98% Native American, 0.20% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 23.48% from other races, and 0.98% from two or more races. 34.25% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 14.3% were of English, 8.1% German and 5.8% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 340 households out of which 45.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.80% were married couples living together, 7.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.40% were non-families. 20.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.52.

In the county, the population was spread out with 35.20% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 27.50% from 25 to 44, 20.10% from 45 to 64, and 9.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 110.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,576, and the median income for a family was $31,534. Males had a median income of $23,854 versus $20,192 for females. The per capita income for the county was $11,141. About 18.70% of families and 19.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.10% of those under age 18 and 11.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 982 people, 345 households, and 243 families residing in the county. [22] The population density was 0.6 inhabitants per square mile (0.23/km2). There were 531 housing units at an average density of 0.3 per square mile (0.12/km2). [23] The racial makeup of the county was 72.4% white, 1.0% American Indian, 0.7% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 23.8% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 40.5% of the population. [22] In terms of ancestry, 14.8% were English, 7.4% were German, and 6.5% were American. [24]

Of the 345 households, 37.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.6% were non-families, and 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.41. The median age was 32.7 years. [22]

The median income for a household in the county was $40,909 and the median income for a family was $37,656. Males had a median income of $32,895 versus $24,125 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,737. About 8.7% of families and 11.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.5% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over. [25]

Education

The public schools in the county are operated by Clark County School District #161, headquartered in Dubois. Clark County High School competes in athletics in the Rocky Mountain Conference in IHSAA 1A Division II; the school colors are orange and black and its mascot is a bobcat.

Communities

Incorporated communities

Unincorporated communities

Politics

Presidential Elections

The County has participated in every Presidential election since the election of 1920. The County has voted for every Republican candidate except in 1932 when it voted for the Democratic candidate Franklin Roosevelt giving him 54% of the vote.

Presidential elections results
Previous presidential elections results [26]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 71.7% 203 15.6% 44 12.7% 36
2012 71.7% 235 20.1% 66 8.2% 27
2008 81.3% 305 17.1% 64 1.6% 6
2004 85.6% 302 13.0% 46 1.4% 5
2000 81.4% 311 16.5% 63 2.1% 8
1996 61.3% 266 27.0% 117 11.8% 51
1992 46.1% 195 22.5% 95 31.4% 133
1988 66.8% 281 31.6% 133 1.7% 7
1984 85.1% 353 14.2% 59 0.7% 3
1980 78.5% 379 18.0% 87 3.5% 17
1976 64.5% 334 32.6% 169 2.9% 15
1972 74.3% 339 14.0% 64 11.6% 53
1968 66.6% 271 21.4% 87 12.0% 49
1964 58.5% 262 41.5% 186
1960 61.7% 283 38.3% 176
1956 67.8% 318 32.2% 151
1952 75.2% 382 24.8% 126
1948 60.7% 262 38.2% 165 1.2% 5
1944 63.5% 317 36.1% 180 0.4% 2
1940 65.3% 399 34.7% 212
1936 52.4% 304 46.9% 272 0.7% 4
1932 45.9% 276 54.0% 325 0.2% 1
1928 74.9% 388 24.9% 129 0.2% 1
1924 69.5% 496 24.5% 175 6.0% 43
1920 76.3% 594 23.6% 184 0.1% 1

Voter Registration

As of March 15, 2018 there are 363 registered voters in the county. There are 291 registered Republican's, 51 voters are unaffiliated, 17 are registered Democrats and 2 people registered to each the Constitution and Libertarian Parties. [27]

Government

Federal

The County is represented in the United States House of Representatives by Republican Mike Simpson of the 2nd Congressional District. It is represented in the United States Senate by Republicans Mike Crapo and James Risch.

State

The County is in the 35th Legislature district. It is represented by Republican Senator Jeff Siddoway. And Republican representatives Van Burtenshaw and Karey Hanks.

County

The County has 3 County Commissioners Nick Hillman, Greg Shenton, and Macoy Ward. The county also has other County officials like Sheriff, County Clerk, Attorney, Coroner, Treasurer, and Assesor.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  2. ^ Lee, Sandra L. (February 25, 1990). "Harsh land is home to a hardy breed". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). p. 1-centennial.
  3. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  4. ^ Report on Population of the United States at the Eleventh Census: 1890 (PDF). Washington: Government Printing Office. 1895. p. 99. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  5. ^ "Point of Interest Road Signs: Beaver Canyon". pointofinterestroadsigns.com. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  6. ^ "Dubois". pointsofinterest.com. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  7. ^ Idaho Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. Chicago: The Newberry Library. 2010. pp. 12, 14, 27, 87–88. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  8. ^ Census Reports Volume I: Twelfth Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1900 (PDF). Washington: United States Census Office. 1901. p. 112. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  9. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1910 (PDF). Washington: Government Printing Office. 1913. pp. 415–416. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  10. ^ A Report of the Seventeenth Decennial Census of the United States Census of Population: 1950 (PDF). United States Government Printing Office. 1952. p. 12-15. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  11. ^ a b "Clark County now a reality". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). February 2, 1919. p. 2.
  12. ^ "Clark County created in Idaho". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). February 2, 1919. p. 3.
  13. ^ Pettite, William Stibal (April 26, 1962). "Tiny Clark County long on history". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). p. 2.
  14. ^ Idaho.gov – Clark County Archived 2009-04-29 at the Wayback Machine. – accessed 2009-05-28
  15. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  16. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved Apr 7, 2018.
  17. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  18. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  19. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  20. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  21. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  22. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09.
  23. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09.
  24. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09.
  25. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-09.
  26. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-04-04.
  27. ^ https://sos.idaho.gov/elect/VoterReg/Party%20Affiliation%20Totals/2018/MarchCounty.pdf

External links


CLARK COUNTY IDAHO Latitude and Longitude:

44°12′N 112°12′W / 44.2°N 112.2°W / 44.2; -112.2