Cherokee County, Kansas Article

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Cherokee County, Kansas
County
Cherokee County
Tri-state markers 2006-07-03.jpg
Map of Kansas highlighting Cherokee County
Location in the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.

CHEROKEE COUNTY KANSAS Latitude and Longitude:

37°10′N 94°51′W / 37.167°N 94.850°W / 37.167; -94.850
FoundedFebruary 18, 1860
Named for Cherokee Native Americans
Seat Columbus
Largest city Baxter Springs
Area
 • Total591 sq mi (1,531 km2)
 • Land588 sq mi (1,523 km2)
 • Water3.5 sq mi (9 km2), 0.6%
Population (est.)
 • ( 2016)20,246
 • Density37/sq mi (14/km2)
Area code(s) 620
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Central: UTC−6/ −5
Website cherokeecountyks.gov

Cherokee County (county code CK) is a U.S. county located in Southeast Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 21,603. [1] Its county seat is Columbus, [2] and its most populous city is Baxter Springs. The latter became the first "cow town" in Kansas during the 1870s and the period of cattle drives.

History

19th century

In 1803, United States acquired from France the 828,000-square mile Louisiana Purchase, the former French lands west of the Mississippi River, for 2.83 cents per acre. This territory included most of the land for modern-day Kansas.

In the 1830s, the United States conducted Indian Removal of the Five Civilized Tribes from the Southeast region, to extinguish their land claims and allow European-American settlement in the area. They were given lands in what was called Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River, mostly in present-day Oklahoma. This part of Kansas was included at the time in the Cherokee Neutral Lands, and the county was named after this tribe.

In 1854, the US organized the Kansas Territory. Settlers began to move into the territory, with violence breaking out between supporters of slavery and those who wanted to abolish it. In 1861, Kansas was admitted as the 34th U.S. state; its constitution prohibited slavery. In 1860, Cherokee County was established.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 591 square miles (1,530 km2), of which 588 square miles (1,520 km2) is land and 3.5 square miles (9.1 km2) (0.6%) is water. [3]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Sources: National Atlas, [4] U.S. Census Bureau [5]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18601,501
187011,038635.4%
188021,90598.5%
189027,77026.8%
190042,69453.7%
191038,162−10.6%
192033,609−11.9%
193031,457−6.4%
194029,817−5.2%
195025,144−15.7%
196022,279−11.4%
197021,549−3.3%
198022,3043.5%
199021,374−4.2%
200022,6055.8%
201021,603−4.4%
Est. 201620,246 [6]−6.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790-1960 [8] 1900-1990 [9]
1990-2000 [10] 2010-2016 [1]

As of the 2000 census, [11] there were 22,605 people, 8,875 households, and 6,239 families residing in the county. The population density was 38 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 10,031 housing units at an average density of 17 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 92.27% White, 0.61% Black or African American, 3.45% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 2.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.29% of the population.

There were 8,875 households out of which 32.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.60% were married couples living together, 9.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.70% were non-families. 26.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.50% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 26.90% from 25 to 44, 23.10% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 94.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,505, and the median income for a family was $37,284. Males had a median income of $29,045 versus $19,675 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,710. About 11.40% of families and 14.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.40% of those under age 18 and 10.60% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Presidential elections

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results [12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 71.7% 6,182 23.3% 2,005 5.0% 433
2012 63.7% 5,456 34.2% 2,930 2.2% 185
2008 60.9% 5,886 37.2% 3,594 1.9% 185
2004 61.4% 6,083 37.6% 3,726 1.1% 104
2000 54.9% 5,014 41.4% 3,783 3.6% 333
1996 45.8% 4,138 41.7% 3,771 12.5% 1,134
1992 36.8% 3,589 41.9% 4,083 21.4% 2,085
1988 51.0% 4,281 48.4% 4,069 0.6% 52
1984 60.7% 5,801 38.3% 3,663 0.9% 89
1980 54.8% 5,296 41.1% 3,969 4.1% 397
1976 42.9% 3,957 55.9% 5,154 1.2% 107
1972 67.0% 6,019 31.3% 2,806 1.7% 155
1968 47.5% 4,211 40.5% 3,597 12.0% 1,064
1964 39.3% 3,730 60.2% 5,720 0.5% 47
1960 56.5% 5,753 42.8% 4,366 0.7% 73
1956 58.4% 5,824 41.2% 4,112 0.4% 39
1952 57.4% 6,261 42.1% 4,597 0.5% 56
1948 47.8% 4,616 50.2% 4,854 2.0% 193
1944 54.7% 5,458 44.7% 4,468 0.6% 62
1940 49.3% 6,600 49.8% 6,670 0.9% 126
1936 40.6% 5,445 58.9% 7,894 0.5% 69
1932 34.1% 4,045 62.6% 7,442 3.3% 393
1928 66.2% 7,478 30.5% 3,442 3.3% 376
1924 52.9% 5,437 29.9% 3,071 17.2% 1,770
1920 55.8% 5,466 39.1% 3,832 5.0% 492
1916 37.6% 4,350 53.4% 6,188 9.0% 1,047
1912 26.5% 1,994 35.2% 2,641 38.3% 2,878 [a]
1908 44.3% 3,893 43.4% 3,819 12.3% 1,083
1904 55.8% 4,586 27.4% 2,253 16.8% 1,378
1900 45.2% 4,478 53.5% 5,302 1.3% 131
1896 40.2% 3,505 58.6% 5,108 1.2% 106
1892 41.4% 2,696 58.6% 3,812
1888 45.6% 2,935 31.7% 2,038 22.7% 1,461

Laws

Although the Kansas Constitution was amended in 1986 to allow the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with the approval of voters, Cherokee County voters chose to remain a prohibition, or "dry", county until 2012. [13]

Education

Unified school districts

  • Cherokee USD 247 ( Web site) is a 300-square-mile (780 km2) school district primarily covering portions of Crawford and Cherokee counties, but also includes small portions of Labette and Neosho counties. It serves over 800 students in grades Pre-K through 12. Southeast High School (the "Lancers") is located just west of the city of Cherokee (where the district office is located). In Cherokee County the district serves the cities of Weir and West Mineral. [14]
  • Riverton USD 404 ( Web site)
  • Columbus USD 493 ( Web site)
  • Galena USD 499 ( Web site)
  • Baxter Springs USD 508 ( Web site)

Communities

2005 KDOT Map of Cherokee County ( map legend)

Cities

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Ghost town

  • Treece, officially disincorporated in 2012 by the state of Kansas [19] [20]

Townships

Cherokee County is divided into fourteen townships. The cities of Baxter Springs, Columbus, Galena, Scammon, and Weir are considered governmentally independent and are excluded from the census figures for the townships. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size.

Township FIPS Population
center
Population Population
density
/km² (/sq mi)
Land area
km² (sq mi)
Water area
km² (sq mi)
Water % Geographic coordinates
Cherokee 12800 336 6 (15) 57 (22) 0 (0) 0.08% 37°18′33″N 94°45′36″W / 37.30917°N 94.76000°W / 37.30917; -94.76000
Crawford 16225 646 7 (18) 94 (36) 0 (0) 0.24% 37°9′21″N 94°47′11″W / 37.15583°N 94.78639°W / 37.15583; -94.78639
Garden 25250 3,039 41 (105) 75 (29) 2 (1) 2.80% 37°2′55″N 94°41′18″W / 37.04861°N 94.68833°W / 37.04861; -94.68833
Lola 42350 382 3 (9) 115 (44) 1 (0) 0.50% 37°10′25″N 95°0′15″W / 37.17361°N 95.00417°W / 37.17361; -95.00417
Lowell 43075 672 20 (52) 33 (13) 1 (0) 3.04% 37°6′11″N 94°40′23″W / 37.10306°N 94.67306°W / 37.10306; -94.67306
Lyon 43400 528 4 (11) 130 (50) 0 (0) 0.08% 37°2′19″N 94°52′37″W / 37.03861°N 94.87694°W / 37.03861; -94.87694
Mineral 47000 254 3 (8) 79 (31) 0 (0) 0.15% 37°15′32″N 94°47′29″W / 37.25889°N 94.79139°W / 37.25889; -94.79139
Neosho 49725 306 2 (5) 157 (61) 2 (1) 1.08% 37°3′15″N 95°1′37″W / 37.05417°N 95.02694°W / 37.05417; -95.02694
Pleasant View 56675 658 5 (13) 136 (52) 0 (0) 0.14% 37°17′4″N 94°40′1″W / 37.28444°N 94.66694°W / 37.28444; -94.66694
Ross 61350 893 6 (17) 140 (54) 1 (0) 0.71% 37°16′29″N 94°53′55″W / 37.27472°N 94.89861°W / 37.27472; -94.89861
Salamanca 62575 569 6 (17) 89 (34) 0 (0) 0.07% 37°10′3″N 94°52′37″W / 37.16750°N 94.87694°W / 37.16750; -94.87694
Shawnee 64475 505 6 (15) 90 (35) 1 (0) 0.61% 37°9′30″N 94°40′18″W / 37.15833°N 94.67167°W / 37.15833; -94.67167
Sheridan 64625 249 1 (4) 172 (67) 1 (1) 0.79% 37°15′41″N 95°0′15″W / 37.26139°N 95.00417°W / 37.26139; -95.00417
Spring Valley 67725 1,007 8 (21) 122 (47) 0 (0) 0.36% 37°3′11″N 94°46′5″W / 37.05306°N 94.76806°W / 37.05306; -94.76806
Sources: "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. Archived from the original on 2002-08-02.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2015-05-10. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  4. ^ National Atlas Archived December 5, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ U.S. Census Bureau TIGER shape files
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  13. ^ "Map of Wet and Dry Counties" (PDF). Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. December 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-26.
  14. ^ Burns, Tim (September 19, 2005). "Welcome To USD #247". Cherokee, USD 247. Archived from the original on 2007-08-10. Retrieved 2007-01-23.
  15. ^ a b Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 493. ISBN  0-8061-0994-7.
  16. ^ Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 491. ISBN  0-8061-0994-7.
  17. ^ Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 275. ISBN  0-8061-0994-7.
  18. ^ Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 245. ISBN  0-8061-0994-7.
  19. ^ a b c Rydjord, John (1972). Kansas Place-Names. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma. p. 494. ISBN  0-8061-0994-7.
  20. ^ Former residents say goodbye to contaminated town of Treece; The Wichita Eagle; September 27, 2012. Archived September 30, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
Notes
  1. ^ 2,006 votes for Socialist Eugene Debs and 872 for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt.

Further reading

External links

County
Historical
Maps