Carter County, Tennessee Article

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Carter County, Tennessee
Carter-County-Courthouse-tn2.jpg
Carter County Courthouse in Elizabethton
Seal of Carter County, Tennessee
Seal
Map of Tennessee highlighting Carter County
Location in the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Founded1796
Named forLandon Carter [1]
Seat Elizabethton
Largest cityElizabethton
Area
 • Total348 sq mi (901 km2)
 • Land341 sq mi (883 km2)
 • Water6.4 sq mi (17 km2), 1.8%
Population
 • ( 2010)57,424
 • Density168/sq mi (65/km2)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Eastern: UTC−5/ −4
Website www.cartercountytn.gov

Carter County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 57,424. [2] Its county seat is Elizabethton. [3] The county is named in honor of Landon Carter (1760-1800), an early settler active in the "Lost State of Franklin" 1784-1788 secession from the State of North Carolina.

Carter County is part of the Johnson City, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City– KingsportBristol, TN- VA Combined Statistical Area, located in northeastern Tennessee.

History

A map of the Province of Carolina

The area was originally claimed by Britain as part of the Clarendon settlements of the Province of Carolina, although actually populated at the time by the Cherokee.

The area was part of (though seldom actually administered by) the following jurisdictions in its early history:

Watauga Association

The county is named for General Landon Carter, [4] the son of John Carter of Virginia, who was "chairman of the court" of the first majority-rule system of American democracy, known as the Watauga Association of 1772. The association was the first permanent settlement established outside the original thirteen American colonies and included the area that is today's Carter County. In 1775, the Association was absorbed into North Carolina by petition, becoming known thereafter as the Washington District.

As Wayne County in the State of Franklin

J. G. M. Ramsey records within his 1853 Annals of Tennessee that the State of Franklin established Wayne County from sections of both Washington County and a part of Wilkes County "lying west of the extreme heights of the Apalachian or Alleghany Mountains, into a separate and distinct county by the name of Wayne... This new county covered the same territory now embraced in the limits of Carter and Johnson counties." [5]

The county seat, Elizabethton, is named for Carter's wife, Elizabeth MacLin Carter. [6]

Civil War

Like most East Tennessee counties, Carter Countians opposed secession on the eve of the Civil War. In Tennessee's Ordinance of Secession referendum on June 8, 1861, Carter Countians rejected secession by a vote of 1,343 to 86. [7] A railroad bridge at Carter's Depot (modern Watauga) was among those targeted by the East Tennessee bridge-burning conspiracy in November 1861. [8]

Early railroad

Carter County was served by the narrow gauge East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (The ET&WNC, nicknamed "Tweetsie") until the line ceased operations in 1950.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 348 square miles (900 km2), of which 341 square miles (880 km2) is land and 6.4 square miles (17 km2) (1.8%) is water. [9]

Carter County is situated entirely within the Blue Ridge Mountains, specifically the Unaka Range and the Iron Mountains. [10] Roan Mountain, which at 6,285 feet (1,916 m) is the highest point in Tennessee outside the Great Smoky Mountains, straddles the county's eastern border with North Carolina. The county's boundary with Sullivan County is defined as the ridgeline of Holston Mountain.

Lakes

Rivers

Waterfalls

The main waterfall at Blue Hole Falls, located northeast of Elizabethton on Holston Mountain.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

State protected areas

Major highways

Law enforcement

Carter County is served by the Carter County Sheriff's Office, located in Elizabethton. As of 2014, the Sheriff of Carter County is Dexter Lunceford. [12] The Elizabethton Police Department services the City of Elizabethton inside Carter County. As of 2018, the Chief of Police is Jason Shaw. [13]

Climate

Climate data for Carter County, Tennessee (Bristol-Johnson City)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 43.7
(6.5)
48.0
(8.9)
58.9
(14.9)
67.4
(19.7)
75.2
(24)
82.2
(27.9)
84.6
(29.2)
84.1
(28.9)
79.1
(26.2)
69.1
(20.6)
58.2
(14.6)
48.1
(8.9)
66.6
(19.2)
Daily mean °F (°C) 34.0
(1.1)
37.4
(3)
47.2
(8.4)
55.2
(12.9)
63.4
(17.4)
71.1
(21.7)
74.4
(23.6)
73.6
(23.1)
67.9
(19.9)
56.7
(13.7)
47.0
(8.3)
38.2
(3.4)
55.5
(13.1)
Average low °F (°C) 24.3
(−4.3)
26.8
(−2.9)
35.4
(1.9)
43.0
(6.1)
51.6
(10.9)
59.9
(15.5)
64.1
(17.8)
63.1
(17.3)
56.6
(13.7)
44.2
(6.8)
35.9
(2.2)
28.2
(−2.1)
44.4
(6.9)
Average rainfall inches (mm) 3.2
(81)
3.4
(86)
3.7
(94)
3.3
(84)
3.8
(97)
3.5
(89)
4.3
(109)
3.2
(81)
3.3
(84)
2.6
(66)
2.9
(74)
3.4
(86)
40.7
(1,034)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 5.2
(13.2)
4.2
(10.7)
2.3
(5.8)
0.4
(1)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.9
(2.3)
2.6
(6.6)
15.6
(39.6)
Average relative humidity (%) 59.0 71.5 69.0 67.0 69.5 73.0 75.0 76.5 76.5 74.0 68.5 69.5 74.0
Source: Climate-zone.com [14]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18004,813
18104,190−12.9%
18204,83515.4%
18306,41432.7%
18405,372−16.2%
18506,29617.2%
18607,12413.2%
18707,90911.0%
188010,01926.7%
189013,38933.6%
190016,68824.6%
191019,83818.9%
192021,4888.3%
193029,22336.0%
194035,12720.2%
195042,43220.8%
196041,578−2.0%
197042,5752.4%
198050,20517.9%
199051,5052.6%
200056,74210.2%
201057,4241.2%
Est. 201656,502 [15]−1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [16]
1790-1960 [17] 1900-1990 [18]
1990-2000 [19] 2010-2014 [2]
Age pyramid Carter County [20]

As of the census [21] of 2000, there were 56,742 people, 23,486 households, and 16,346 families residing in the county. [22] The population density was 166 people per square mile (64/km²). There were 25,920 housing units at an average density of 76 per square mile (29/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.49% White, 1.00% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.27% from other races, and 0.78% from two or more races. 0.89% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 23,486 households out of which 28.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.90% were married couples living together, 11.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. 26.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.83.

In the county, the population was spread out with 21.40% under the age of 18, 9.20% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,371, and the median income for a family was $33,825. Males had a median income of $26,394 versus $19,687 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,678. About 12.80% of families and 16.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.00% of those under age 18 and 16.00% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Colleges

Communities

Elk Avenue in Elizabethton
U.S. 19E in Roan Mountain

Cities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Politics

Presidential Elections Results [23]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 80.2% 16,898 16.4% 3,453 3.5% 733
2012 75.2% 15,503 23.2% 4,789 1.6% 325
2008 72.8% 15,852 25.7% 5,587 1.5% 330
2004 70.7% 15,768 28.7% 6,395 0.7% 150
2000 63.4% 12,111 35.2% 6,724 1.4% 267
1996 57.7% 10,540 34.0% 6,218 8.3% 1,524
1992 55.8% 10,712 33.9% 6,502 10.3% 1,976
1988 71.7% 12,036 27.6% 4,634 0.6% 108
1984 73.4% 13,153 25.9% 4,642 0.8% 138
1980 64.4% 11,648 33.2% 6,006 2.3% 423
1976 54.1% 8,934 45.1% 7,443 0.8% 133
1972 82.2% 11,102 16.2% 2,191 1.6% 221
1968 64.7% 9,467 14.8% 2,160 20.6% 3,009
1964 61.4% 8,472 38.6% 5,326
1960 77.3% 12,214 21.6% 3,412 1.1% 172
1956 78.8% 11,218 20.6% 2,933 0.6% 85
1952 76.2% 9,019 22.9% 2,707 1.0% 118
1948 70.9% 4,943 26.0% 1,809 3.1% 216
1944 74.3% 4,873 25.4% 1,662 0.3% 21
1940 65.4% 4,238 33.5% 2,171 1.1% 71
1936 72.3% 4,858 27.3% 1,837 0.4% 27
1932 76.3% 5,055 23.7% 1,574
1928 90.4% 4,934 9.4% 512 0.2% 12
1924 86.3% 3,657 13.0% 551 0.7% 28
1920 90.0% 6,059 10.0% 674
1916 85.6% 2,961 14.4% 498
1912 34.1% 1,243 13.1% 478 52.8% 1,926

See also

References

  1. ^ Van West, Carroll. "Carter County". Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved June 22, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 29, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 258 (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. p. 70. OCLC  1156805.
  5. ^ Ramsey, J. G. M. (1853). The Annals of Tennessee to the End of the Eighteenth Century. Charleston: John Russell. p. 295. OCLC  11827530.
  6. ^ "History of Elizabethton". Elizabethton.org. Retrieved November 5, 2015.
  7. ^ Oliver Perry Temple, East Tennessee and the Civil War (R. Clarke Company, 1899), p. 199.
  8. ^ David Madden, "Unionist Resistance to Confederate Occupation: The Bridge Burners of East Tennessee," East Tennessee Historical Society Publications, Vols. 52-53 (1980-1981), pp. 22-40.
  9. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  10. ^ Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, et al., " Ambient Air Monitoring Plan," Environmental Protection Agency website, July 1, 2010. Accessed: March 18, 2015.
  11. ^ Aerial image from USGS via Microsoft Research Maps
  12. ^ Morris-Frye, Abby (August 8, 2014). "Round 2: Lunceford tops Mathes for sheriff". Elizabethton Star. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  13. ^ "A Message from the Chief of Police". Elizabethton.org. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  14. ^ "Bristol - Johnson City". Climate-zone.com. Retrieved August 16, 2013.
  15. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  16. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 22, 2013. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  17. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  18. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  19. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 2, 2015.
  20. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  21. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  22. ^ Brown, Emily; DeBarros, Anthony; DeRamus, Kristin; et al. (2011). "Census 2010: Tennessee". USA Today. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  23. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 10, 2018.

External links


CARTER COUNTY TENNESSEE Latitude and Longitude:

36°18′N 82°7′W / 36.300°N 82.117°W / 36.300; -82.117