Bourbon County, Kansas Article

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Bourbon County, Kansas
County
Bourbon County Courthouse - Fort Scott Kansas 10-10-2016.jpg
Bourbon County Courthouse in Fort Scott
Map of Kansas highlighting Bourbon County
Location in the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.

BOURBON COUNTY KANSAS Latitude and Longitude:

37°51′N 94°51′W / 37.850°N 94.850°W / 37.850; -94.850
FoundedAugust 25, 1855
Named for Bourbon County, Kentucky
Seat Fort Scott
Largest cityFort Scott
Area
 • Total639 sq mi (1,655 km2)
 • Land635 sq mi (1,645 km2)
 • Water3.6 sq mi (9 km2), 0.6%
Population (est.)
 • ( 2016)14,617
 • Density24/sq mi (9/km2)
Area code(s) 620
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Central: UTC−6/ −5
Website BourbonCountyKS.org

Bourbon County (county code BB) is a county located in Southeast Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 15,173. [1] Its county seat and most populous city is Fort Scott. [2]

History

Early history

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau.

19th century

In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles. In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre.

In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state. In 1855, Bourbon County was established.

21st century

Bourbon virus, a new strain of thogotovirus, was first discovered in Bourbon County. In the spring of 2014 an otherwise healthy man was bitten by a tick, contracting the virus and died 11 days later from organ failure. [3] [4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 639 square miles (1,660 km2), of which 635 square miles (1,640 km2) is land and 3.6 square miles (9.3 km2) (0.6%) is water. [5]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Major highways

Sources: National Atlas, [6] U.S. Census Bureau [7]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18606,101
187015,076147.1%
188019,59129.9%
189028,57545.9%
190024,712−13.5%
191024,007−2.9%
192023,198−3.4%
193022,386−3.5%
194020,944−6.4%
195019,153−8.6%
196016,090−16.0%
197015,215−5.4%
198015,9695.0%
199014,966−6.3%
200015,3792.8%
201015,173−1.3%
Est. 201614,617 [8]−3.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
1790-1960 [10] 1900-1990 [11]
1990-2000 [12] 2010-2016 [1]

As of the 2000 census, [13] there were 15,379 people, 6,161 households, and 4,127 families residing in the county. The population density was 24 people per square mile (9/km²). There were 7,135 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.06% White, 3.08% Black or African American, 0.84% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 1.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.29% of the population.

There were 6,161 households out of which 30.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.50% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.00% were non-families. 29.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.80% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 24.20% from 25 to 44, 22.30% from 45 to 64, and 18.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,199, and the median income for a family was $39,239. Males had a median income of $27,043 versus $20,983 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,393. About 9.50% of families and 13.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.00% of those under age 18 and 13.40% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Presidential elections

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results [14]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 72.6% 4,424 21.9% 1,336 5.5% 333
2012 65.6% 4,102 31.9% 1,996 2.5% 156
2008 62.5% 4,240 35.3% 2,394 2.2% 147
2004 65.4% 4,372 33.1% 2,216 1.5% 98
2000 61.1% 3,852 35.1% 2,211 3.9% 245
1996 50.2% 3,318 37.7% 2,491 12.2% 805
1992 40.2% 2,876 35.1% 2,509 24.8% 1,774
1988 57.8% 3,660 41.4% 2,623 0.8% 49
1984 68.4% 4,858 30.6% 2,175 1.0% 69
1980 59.2% 4,263 36.2% 2,605 4.6% 331
1976 51.8% 3,589 46.7% 3,237 1.5% 103
1972 70.1% 4,776 28.1% 1,912 1.9% 126
1968 56.9% 3,983 32.0% 2,241 11.1% 780
1964 44.9% 3,290 54.4% 3,980 0.7% 53
1960 63.0% 5,062 36.5% 2,928 0.5% 41
1956 62.4% 5,306 37.1% 3,151 0.6% 47
1952 65.3% 5,785 34.1% 3,023 0.6% 56
1948 51.4% 4,225 47.2% 3,879 1.4% 111
1944 56.7% 4,790 42.9% 3,622 0.5% 39
1940 53.6% 5,751 45.7% 4,898 0.7% 78
1936 48.6% 5,402 51.4% 5,714 0.0% 4
1932 42.6% 4,277 55.6% 5,577 1.8% 181
1928 75.9% 7,251 23.3% 2,223 0.9% 82
1924 49.0% 4,210 33.2% 2,850 17.9% 1,538
1920 52.1% 4,194 45.1% 3,632 2.8% 225
1916 37.6% 3,370 58.1% 5,209 4.3% 388
1912 27.0% 1,448 41.3% 2,209 31.7% 1,698
1908 47.8% 2,695 47.7% 2,686 4.5% 253
1904 59.3% 3,234 33.1% 1,808 7.6% 415
1900 51.4% 3,024 47.5% 2,799 1.1% 65
1896 48.2% 2,900 51.0% 3,067 0.8% 50
1892 49.2% 2,803 50.8% 2,889
1888 57.1% 3,569 29.3% 1,831 13.7% 854

Laws

Following amendment to the Kansas Constitution in 1986, the county remained a prohibition, or "dry", county until 1992, when voters approved the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with a 30% food sales requirement. [15]

Education

Unified school districts

Communities

2005 KDOT Map of Bourbon County ( map legend)

Cities

Unincorporated communities

Townships

Bourbon County is divided into eleven townships. The city of Fort Scott is considered governmentally independent and is excluded from the census figures for the townships. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size.

Township FIPS Population
center
Population Population
density
/km² (/sq mi)
Land area
km² (sq mi)
Water area
km² (sq mi)
Water % Geographic coordinates
Drywood 18750 394 3 (8) 120 (47) 0 (0) 0.19% 37°43′19″N 94°40′36″W / 37.72194°N 94.67667°W / 37.72194; -94.67667
Franklin 24300 312 2 (4) 185 (71) 0 (0) 0.13% 37°59′41″N 94°59′14″W / 37.99472°N 94.98722°W / 37.99472; -94.98722
Freedom 24600 Fulton 505 4 (12) 113 (44) 0 (0) 0.17% 38°0′4″N 94°44′45″W / 38.00111°N 94.74583°W / 38.00111; -94.74583
Marion 44650 Bronson,
Uniontown
1,165 4 (12) 259 (100) 0 (0) 0.19% 37°51′14″N 95°1′12″W / 37.85389°N 95.02000°W / 37.85389; -95.02000
Marmaton 44900 815 6 (15) 145 (56) 0 (0) 0.13% 37°48′57″N 94°50′16″W / 37.81583°N 94.83778°W / 37.81583; -94.83778
Mill Creek 46675 472 3 (9) 136 (52) 1 (0) 0.42% 37°54′45″N 94°50′14″W / 37.91250°N 94.83722°W / 37.91250; -94.83722
Osage 53100 394 3 (8) 125 (48) 0 (0) 0.16% 37°58′40″N 94°39′33″W / 37.97778°N 94.65917°W / 37.97778; -94.65917
Pawnee 54775 308 2 (6) 126 (49) 0 (0) 0.31% 37°43′31″N 94°50′30″W / 37.72528°N 94.84167°W / 37.72528; -94.84167
Scott 63500 2,326 13 (34) 179 (69) 2 (1) 0.94% 37°48′35″N 94°41′30″W / 37.80972°N 94.69167°W / 37.80972; -94.69167
Timberhill 70600 Mapleton 256 3 (7) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.05% 38°0′31″N 94°52′57″W / 38.00861°N 94.88250°W / 38.00861; -94.88250
Walnut 74850 135 1 (2) 154 (59) 0 (0) 0.13% 37°43′10″N 94°59′0″W / 37.71944°N 94.98333°W / 37.71944; -94.98333
Sources: "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. Archived from the original on 2002-08-02.

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 21, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "New details on mystery virus that killed Kansas man". CBS News.
  4. ^ "New so-called Bourbon virus linked to Kansas man's death after tick bite". UPI.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. ^ National Atlas Archived December 5, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ U.S. Census Bureau TIGER shape files
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved July 21, 2014.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 21, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 21, 2014.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 21, 2014.
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  14. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  15. ^ "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2006. Archived from the original on 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2007-12-26.
  16. ^ "Jonathan M. Davis". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 30 September 2012.

Further reading

External links

County
Maps