Arabic language in the United States Article

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A bilingual (English, Arabic) sign at the Detroit People Mover Grand Circus Park station
Arabic speakers in the US
Year
Speakers
1910 a
32,868
1920 a
57,557
1930 a
67,830
1940 a
50,940
1960 a
49,908
1970 a
73,657
1980 a
251,409
1990 [1]
355,150
2000 [2]
614,582
2010 [3]
864,961
2014 [4]
1,117,304
^a Foreign-born population only [5] [6]
Arabic speakers in the United States by states in 2010 [3]
State Arabic speakers
California
158,398
Michigan
101,470
New York
86,269
Texas
54,340
Illinois
53,251
New Jersey
51,011
Virginia
36,683
Florida
34,698
Ohio
33,125

The Arabic language is the fastest-growing foreign language taught at U.S. colleges and universities, a trend mirrored at the University of Iowa.[ citation needed]

Arabic in 2006 became the 10th most-studied language in the United States. [7]

In 2013, Arabic was ranked the 8th place on the list of enrollments in higher education in the USA.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Detailed Language Spoken at Home and Ability to Speak English for Persons 5 Years and Over --50 Languages with Greatest Number of Speakers: United States 1990". United States Census Bureau. 1990. Retrieved July 22, 2012.
  2. ^ "Language Spoken at Home: 2000". United States Bureau of the Census. Retrieved August 8, 2012.
  3. ^ a b Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Results".
  4. ^ Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Results".
  5. ^ "Mother Tongue of the Foreign-Born Population: 1910 to 1940, 1960, and 1970". United States Census Bureau. March 9, 1999. Retrieved August 6, 2012.
  6. ^ "Language Spoken at Home for the Foreign-Born Population 5 Years and Over: 1980 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. March 9, 1999. Retrieved August 6, 2012.
  7. ^ Heldt, Diane (25 March 2010). "Arabic is fastest-growing language at U.S. colleges". The Gazette. Retrieved 13 December 2012.