Thomas P. White

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Thomas Patrick White
Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court
In office
August 18, 1959 – October 31, 1962
Appointed byGovernor Pat Brown
Preceded byJohn W. Shenk
Succeeded byPaul Peek
Presiding Justice of the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, Division One
In office
1949–1959
Appointed byGovernor Pat Brown
Succeeded byParker Wood
Personal details
Born(1888-09-28)September 28, 1888
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
DiedFebruary 2, 1968(1968-02-02) (aged 79)
Los Altos, California, U.S.
Spouse(s)
Helen H. White
(m. 1915; death 1937)

Aline Kathleen De Courcy
(m. 1956; death 1959)
Alma materUniversity of Southern California (LLB)

Thomas Patrick White (September 28, 1888 – February 2, 1968) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of California from August 18, 1959, to October 31, 1962.

Biography[edit]

White was born in the Lincoln Heights district of Los Angeles, California, and educated in the public schools. He graduated from St. Vincent's high school, and studied for a year at St. Vincent's college. He then worked for the Santa Fe Railroad. In 1911, he graduated from the University of Southern California with a LL.B. degree.

Following graduation, White entered private practice in the firm of Randall, Bartlett & White from 1911 to 1913. In 1913, he was appointed judge of the Los Angeles Police Court, taking the seat of H. H. Rose.[1][2] In August 1914, he helped create a women's division in the court, which included women serving as judges.[3][4] In 1918, he ran unsuccessfully for Superior Court judge.[5] In 1920, he resigned from the Police Court to enter private practice in Los Angeles with the firm of Irwin, White & Rosecrans, where he employed a young attorney, Louis H. Burke, who went onto the California Supreme Court.[6]

On August 21, 1931, Governor James Rolph appointed White as a judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court. In 1932, White ran for re-election and won.[7]

On December 5, 1937, Governor Frank Merriam elevated White to the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, Division One.[8] In 1949, Governor Earl Warren appointed him Presiding Justice of that court.

In August 1959, Governor Pat Brown named him an Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court.[9] After retiring from the bench in October 1962, White continued to occasionally hear cases by designation.[10]

He died on February 2, 1968, in Los Angeles.[11]

Honors and awards[edit]

In 1926, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Loyola Law School and later received the St. Thomas More Medallion.[12] In 1961, he received the Asa V. Call Award from the University of Southern California as outstanding alumnus.[13]

Personal life[edit]

White married twice. He married Helen H. White in February 1915.[14] After her death in 1937, at age 67 he re-married to Aline Kathleen De Courcy in Los Angeles on July 18, 1956.[15] She died on November 19, 1959.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Deadlock is Broken, White Named Judge". Los Angeles Herald (276). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 19 August 1913. p. 7. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  2. ^ "Judge White to Speak". Los Angeles Herald (60). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 10 January 1918. p. 3. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  3. ^ "Open Woman's Court". Los Angeles Herald (253). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 24 August 1914. p. 9. Retrieved July 25, 2017. Following the example set by New York city, Los Angeles will have a 'woman's police court,' starting September 1. Police Judge Thomas P. White announced this after a consultation with Chief Sebastian. Spectators will be barred from the courtroom, where only the cases of women will be heard. Judge White will preside at the court.
  4. ^ "L.A. Women Tries 8 Cases in Police Court". Los Angeles Herald (50). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 29 December 1914. p. 5. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  5. ^ "Judge White Opens Campaign Quarters". Los Angeles Herald (210). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 4 July 1918. p. 6. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  6. ^ "Vernon's Ex-Chief Gets Probation on Past Good Behavior". Los Angeles Herald (123). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 24 March 1921. p. B1. Retrieved July 25, 2017. On a showing made by Attorney Thomas P. White
  7. ^ "Fitts Runs Away From His Opponents In L. A. Ballot". San Bernardino Sun (38). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 1 September 1932. p. 23. Retrieved July 25, 2017. The most spirited fight came In office No. 18 In which Municipal Judge James H. Pope was holding a slim lead over Judge Thomas P. White, incumbent. It was certain that the contest will not be decided until November.
  8. ^ "Jurist Blames Social Attitude in Crime Gain". San Bernardino Sun (44). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 16 December 1937. p. 13. Retrieved July 25, 2017. Anti-social attitude of a large part of American society was blamed yesterday for present day crime conditions by Thomas P. White, associate justice of the court of appeals, Los Angeles, in an address before the San Bernardino Kiwanis club. The Jurist, who served several terms on the superior bench prior to his recent elevation by Governor Merriam.
  9. ^ "New Justices Named by Brown". Desert Sun (45). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 7 October 1959. p. 7B. Retrieved July 25, 2017. Brown said Monday he had appointed Justice Parker Wood to become presiding justice of the court's Division 1. Wood replaced Justice Thomas P. White, recently named to the state Supreme Court.
  10. ^ "U.S. High Court Appeal Seen Certain on Housing Realty Group Plans Fight Over Ruling". Desert Sun (239). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 11 May 1966. p. 2. Retrieved July 25, 2017. Justice Stanley Mosk, who opposed Proposition 14 as State Attorney General, did not participate In the decision. Sitting in his place was retired Justice Thomas P. White,
  11. ^ "News Briefs". Madera Tribune (188). California Digital Newspaper Collection. UPI. 7 February 1968. p. 1. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  12. ^ "Justice Goldberg to be Honored". Loyola Lawyer (Winter): 15. 1980. Retrieved July 25, 2017. St. Thomas More Medallion...Previous winners have been Thomas P. White
  13. ^ "Asa V. Call Alumni Achievement Award Past Recipients" (PDF). University of Southern California. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  14. ^ "Farewell Bachelor Banquet to White". Los Angeles Herald (68). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 19 January 1915. p. 9. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  15. ^ "Presiding Justice White Will Be Married Today". The Los Angeles Times. Newspapers.com. July 18, 1956. p. 37. Retrieved July 27, 2017. Best man will be Superior Judge Otto J. Emme, who first introduced Justice White to Mrs. Dower 14 years ago. She will be attended by her sister, Miss Grace De Courcy....The 67-year-old Justice White's first wife, Mrs. Helen White, whom he married in 1915, died nearly 21 years ago....Justice White, born in Los Angeles, took his first judicial post as a judge of the Police Court in 1913. He returned to private law practice in 1919 and was appointed to the Superior Court in 1931 and to the appellate court in 1937.

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
John W. Shenk
Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court
1959–1962
Succeeded by
Paul Peek
Preceded by
Presiding Justice of the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, Division One
1949–1959
Succeeded by
Parker Wood