Draft:Tarjimly

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This draft reads like an advertisement, but Wikipedia is not for advertising. Robert McClenon (talk) 11:05, 8 April 2019 (UTC)


Tarjimly (company)[edit]

Tarjimly is a tech nonprofit that enables remote translators to provide real-time, on-demand translation services and support. Translation services and support via the app are supported on iOS and Android devices and Facebook Messenger. [1][2] The company is headquartered in Mountain View, California.

Tarjimly means “translate for me” in Arabic. The company is on a mission to utilize technology and micro-volunteering to improve the lives of refugees and immigrants as well as the efficiency of humanitarian services.[3][4][5][6]

History[edit]

Tarjimly was founded by two Muslim Americans and MIT graduates, Atif Javed,[7][8] a former project manager at Oracle and Aziz Alghunaim, [9][10] a former software engineer at Palantir. The app was launched in 2017 in response to the Syrian refugee crisis and the US Refugee & Travel Ban (Executive Order 13769) implemented by the Trump Administration in January of the same year. [11][12][13][14]

In 2018, Tarjimly signed up 8,000 bilingual volunteer translators.[15][16] The community helped provide aid for over 15,000 refugees and NGOs globally. [17]

In February 2018, Tarjimly launched its iOS and Android applications in addition to being available on Facebook Messenger.[18]

Product[edit]

The Tarjimly app connects refugees, immigrants, and non-profit organizations with a network of remote volunteer translators across the world.[19][20] Translators and end-users can share and send text, pictures, documents, videos, and audio or even get on a phone or video call through the chat platform. [21][22][23]

How It Works[edit]

Tarjimly uses a machine learning algorithm and real-time chat software to anonymously connect end-users (refugees, immigrants, aid workers, nonprofit organizations) with translators.[24][25][26][27]

Anyone who speaks two languages can volunteer to help; registered users sign up to be a translator through an online form where they must specify two or more languages they can read, speak, or write at least at a conversational or informal level. [28][29] Pairings are made based on the end user's needs and is matched to a volunteer translator's profile, availability, specialized knowledge and skill, certification, and written and spoken proficiency level.

When a pairing request is made, Tarjimly will alert a volunteer translator of the request. If the translator is available to help, they must approve the request to begin the session. Once the request is approved, a connection will be made instantly through a secure and anonymous session with only the first names of each user being shared.[30]

These translation services and support have aided in medical check-ups, asylum interviews, rescue operations, and trauma counseling.[31]

Supported Languages[edit]

Currently, Tarjimly supports sixteen languages (plus dialect variations) including English, Arabic, Persian, Pashto, Urdu, Spanish, French, Greek, Italian, Bengali, Turkish, Somali, German, Portuguese, Kurdish and Burmese.[32][33]

The focus is on languages spoken by major refugee populations including Arabic, Farsi, and Pashto.[34]

In the Community[edit]

As of 2019, Tarjimly has a community network of over 2,200 translators who have provided translation support to refugees, immigrants, medical staff, aid workers, lawyers, public officials, and private individuals in both day-to-day and crisis situations.[35][36][37]

The Tarjimly app has been used by more than 15,000 refugees across the globe[38][39] with a community that represents 25 countries including 500 translators who know three languages and 15 partner organizations around the world. [40][41] It has been used by humanitarian organizations such as the International Rescue Committee and Doctors Without Borders. [42]

Tarjimly is supported by tech companies such as Twilio, Facebook, and Airbnb.[43]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peters, Adele (7 February 2019). "When refugees need emergency help with a language barrier, this app connects them to a translator". Fast Company. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  2. ^ Petronzio, Matt (3 February 2017). "This app connects refugees to volunteer translators via Facebook Messenger". Mashable. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  3. ^ Barnes, Angela (7 December 2018). "Tech start-ups in Europe are trying to help immigrants". CNBC. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  4. ^ Coldeway, Devin. "Bilingual? Tarjimly lets you help a refugee or aid worker right now". TechCrunch. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  5. ^ Venkatesan, Supriya (10 February 2017). "Tarjimly is like the Google Translate for refugees". Geektime. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  6. ^ Melendez, Steven (18 February 2017). "In The Trump Age, Developers Are Building Apps To Help Refugees". Fast Company. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  7. ^ "Atif Javed". www.echoinggreen.org. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  8. ^ Hickle, Johanna (11 July 2017). "40 Under 40: Atif Javed of Tarjimly". www.bizjournals.com. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  9. ^ "Aziz Alghunaim". www.echoinggreen.org. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  10. ^ Poulos, Alex (4 March 2019). "Off The Charts: Data for Good with Aziz Alghunaim, Co-founder and CTO of Tarjimly". Chartio Blog. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  11. ^ "Timeline of the Muslim Ban". ACLU of Washington. 23 May 2017. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  12. ^ Norman, Hannah (31 January 2019). "Sparked by the travel ban, this translation app hopes to give voice to the globe's 25 million refugees". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  13. ^ "One app to help all refugees". Grin. 6 September 2017. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  14. ^ Petronzio, Matt (3 February 2017). "This app connects refugees to volunteer translators via Facebook Messenger". Mashable. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  15. ^ Norman, Hannah (31 January 2019). "Sparked by the travel ban, this translation app hopes to give voice to the globe's 25 million refugees". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  16. ^ Peters, Adele (7 February 2019). "When refugees need emergency help with a language barrier, this app connects them to a translator". Fast Company. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  17. ^ Norman, Hannah (31 January 2019). "Sparked by the travel ban, this translation app hopes to give voice to the globe's 25 million refugees". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  18. ^ Khari, Johnson (8 February 2019). "Tarjimly launches translation app geared toward refugees". VentureBeat. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  19. ^ Akef, Mohamad (3 May 2018). "Lost in Translation No More: An Interview with Tarjimly". Impakter. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  20. ^ Rodriguez-Cayro, Kyli (27 February 2018). "This Chat Bot Helps Refugees Connect With Translators — Over Facebook". Bustle. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  21. ^ "New real-time translation app launched to help refugees". Charity Digital News. 8 February 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  22. ^ Akef, Mohamad (3 May 2018). "Lost in Translation No More: An Interview with Tarjimly". Impakter. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  23. ^ Rueckert, Phineas (2 February 2017). "Refugees Are Paired with With Volunteer Translators Instantly With This New App". Global Citizen. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  24. ^ Johnson, Khari (8 February 2019). "Tarjimly launches translation app geared toward refugees". VentureBeat. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  25. ^ Paz, Ivanha (26 February 2018). "Non-profit Service Connects Volunteer Translators To Refugees". PSFK. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  26. ^ Coldeway, Devin. "Bilingual? Tarjimly lets you help a refugee or aid worker right now". TechCrunch. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  27. ^ LaCouter, Travis (12 June 2017). "Putting the social network to good use | Philanthropy Daily". www.philanthropydaily.com. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  28. ^ LaCouter, Travis (12 June 2017). "Putting the social network to good use | Philanthropy Daily". www.philanthropydaily.com. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  29. ^ Petronzio, Matt (3 February 2017). "This app connects refugees to volunteer translators via Facebook Messenger". Mashable. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  30. ^ Venkatesan, Supriya (10 February 2017). "Tarjimly is like the Google Translate for refugees". Geektime. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  31. ^ Barnes, Angela (7 December 2018). "Tech start-ups in Europe are trying to help immigrants". CNBC. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  32. ^ Coldewey, Devin. "Bilingual? Tarjimly lets you help a refugee or aid worker right now". TechCrunch. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  33. ^ Rodriguez-Cayro, Kyli (27 February 2018). "This Chat Bot Helps Refugees Connect With Translators — Over Facebook". Bustle. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  34. ^ Rueckert, Phineas (2 February 2017). "Refugees Are Paired with With Volunteer Translators Instantly With This New App". Global Citizen. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  35. ^ Unknown, Ansa (5 July 2017). "Tarjimly, app to help migrants with translation". InfoMigrants. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  36. ^ Utley, Tori (20 June 2017). "How Three Millennial Entrepreneurs Created A Messenger Bot To Help Refugees". Forbes. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  37. ^ Staff, Entrepreneur (31 May 2018). "10 New Services That'll Make You Say, 'Why Didn't I Think of That?'". Entrepreneur. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  38. ^ Petronzio, Matt (21 June 2017). "How Facebook Messenger bots are driving social change around the world". Mashable. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  39. ^ Khari, Johnson (8 February 2019). "Tarjimly launches translation app geared toward refugees". VentureBeat. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  40. ^ "One app to help all refugees". Grin. 6 September 2017. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  41. ^ Utley, Tori (20 June 2017). "How Three Millennial Entrepreneurs Created A Messenger Bot To Help Refugees". Forbes. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  42. ^ Hannah, Norman (31 January 2019). "Sparked by the travel ban, this translation app hopes to give voice to the globe's 25 million refugees". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  43. ^ Hannah, Norman (31 January 2019). "Sparked by the travel ban, this translation app hopes to give voice to the globe's 25 million refugees". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved 4 June 2019.

Tarjimly (nonprofit)[edit]