Draft:Madge Spencer

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  • Symbol opinion vote.svg Comment: As it stands, it reads like a resume AngusWOOF (barksniff) 13:18, 6 September 2019 (UTC)
  • Symbol opinion vote.svg Comment: Possibly notable per WP:NARTIST, but it's not quite clear from the article. Also needs substantial cleanup for tone and style. Bradv🍁 13:59, 13 March 2019 (UTC)
  • Symbol opinion vote.svg Comment: Submitter, please see my comments on your talk page. ==SITH (talk)== 13:45, 16 December 2018 (UTC)

Madge Marrion Spencer - Studio Potter.

Introduction[edit]

Born 23rd February 1941 in Sweetland, Manchester, Jamaica. Spencer is a Jamaican Woman Artist of the Jamaican Diaspora, has exhibited widely and collaborated in media and print projects. Her work continues the artistic legacy of Cecil Baugh.[1] who trained under Bernard Leach at the Leach Pottery in St.Ives, Cornwall. Spencer's artistic skill in transforming her heritage and experience communicates to audiences in the United Kingdom, the Caribbean, Africa and the USA.

Biography Notes[edit]

1964 - 1966 Attended the Jamaica School of Art and Crafts graduating in Ceramics. Tutor and mentor Cecil Baugh, Spencer's maternal Uncle.

1967 - Moved from Jamaica to Nottingham in the United Kingdom.

1967 - 2000 Married to John Rivers.

Potters Mark[edit]

Registered Signature - MS: Madge Spencer[2]

Creative and Design Values[edit]

Spencer draws inspiration from Jamaican, English and African colours, seasons, motifs and traditions - Afro-Caribbean/English Fusion. [3]. 'Jamaican colours and shapes moulded from English clay.'[4].

Studio Potteries[edit]

1966 - Riversmeet Pottery in Gordon Town, Surrey County, Jamaica. Set up with the assistance of Cecil Baugh and John Rivers.[5].

1968 - Portland Road Pottery, Nottingham, United Kingdom.[6]

1973 - Riddings Pottery in Riddings, Derbyshire, United Kingdom.[7]

2000 - Hunter's Bar Pottery in Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire.[8]

Exhibitions[edit]

1964 - First Solo Exhibition of 112 pieces at the Institute of Jamaica.[9]

1965 - Solo Exhibition at Kingston and St. Andrews Parish Library.[10]

1966 - Solo Exhibition of 135 pieces at Kingston and St. Andrews Parish Library.[11]

1967 - Final Solo Exhibition at The Little Theatre in Kingston opened by Edna Manley wife of Norman Manley the Prime Minister of Jamaica.[12]

1968 - Pieces by Spencer included in the annual Local Artists' Exhibition at Nottingham Castle Museum.[13]

1968 - Spencer's first Solo Exhibition in the UK at the Nottingham Playhouse, part of the Nottingham Royal Concert Hall.[14]

1969 - Solo Exhibition of 250 pieces at the Nottingham Playhouse, opened by R E K Phillips - Counsellor at the Jamaican High Commission in London.[15]. [16]

1970 - Solo Exhibition at Nottingham Playhouse.[17]

1971 - Solo Exhibition of 200 pieces at Nottingham Playhouse.[18]

1972 - Pieces included in the annual Local Artists' Exhibition at Nottingham Castle Museum.[19]

1972 - Solo Exhibition at Nottingham Playhouse.[20]

1973 - Exhibition at Ripley Library in Derbyshire.[21] [22]

1974 - 1977 Local Exhibitions in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.[23][24].

1978 - 'Potters and Painters' Exhibition at Cornhill Gallery, Allestree, Derby.[25]

1985 - 'New Horizons' Exhibition at the Royal Festival Hall, London.[26]

1986 - Solo Exhibition at the Contemporary Art Centre, Kingston, Jamaica.[27]

1987 - 'Double Vision' Exhibition at Cartwright Hall Art Gallery, Bradford.[28]

1988 - Pieces by Madge Spencer acquired by Nottinghamshire County Council for display at Nottingham Castle Museum.[29]

1990 - 'Potters Art' Exhibition at the Black Art Gallery, London.[30]

1991 - Pottery by Spencer acquired for display by the National Gallery of Jamaica and included in the Cecil Baugh Gallery of Ceramics Collection.[31]

1993 - 'Jamaican Winter' Exhibition at the Commonwealth Institute, London visited by the Queen.[32] [33] [34]

1994 - 'Expressions In 3D' Exhibition at the Caribbean Gallery, London.

2005 - Spencer pottery included in the 'Clay and Fire' Tribute Exhibition to Cecil Baugh following his death in 2005.[35]

2017 - 'Signs of an Open City' Exhibition - Museumand.[36]

Prizes[edit]

1965 - Awarded First Prize for Ceramics at the Jamaican Independence Festival.[37]

1970 - Awarded the Holbrook Memorial Prize for Artists.[38]

Publication Citations[edit]

1986 - 'Baugh-Jamaica's Master Potter.' Selectco Publications Ltd. Page 39. ISBN 0-9674991-0-0. Second edition 1990.

1990 - 'The Potter's Art.'[39] 1995 - 'Arts Education for a Multi-cultural Society. An Evaluation of the AEMS Project.'[40]

1997 - 'Trailblazers'[41]

2003 - Action for Social Justice in Education by Morwenna Griffiths. Open University Press.[42]

2006 - Clay and Fire: An Exhibition Dedicated to Cecil Baugh.[43]

2012 - The Nottingham Connection.[44]

2014 - 'Black Arts in British Art: A History from 1950 to the Present.'[45]

Media Appearances[edit]

1967 - JIS-TV Behind the Scenes. Madge Spencer Ceramics.[46]

1985 - Central TV Programme 'Here and Now' feature in "Tops of the Pots" 1:00 p.m on 6th October 1985.[47]

1991 - BBC TV Programme 'Lifeline'.[48]

2009 - Lambley Arts Festival.[49]

2013 - Interview with Pitman Browne.[50]

2015 - Nine Nights.[51]

Hunter's Bar[edit]

Spencer continues to work at her Pottery (Hunter's Bar) in Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire.[52]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laura Tanna and Cecil Baugh (1999). Baugh-Jamaica's Master Potter. Selectco Publication Ltd. Page-39.ISBN 0-9674991-0-0
  2. ^ British Studio Potters' Marks. Eric Yates-Owen and Robert Fournier. Bloomsbury Publishing 2015. Third Edition. Page-510(https://worldcat.org/title/british-studio-potters-marks/oclc/898154728)
  3. ^ Double Vision - An Exhibition of Contemporary Afro-Caribbean Art at Cartwright Hall Art Gallery, Lister Park, Bradford BD9 4NS 8th November 1986 to 4th January 1987. Brochure.
  4. ^ The Potter's Art. Ceramics by Chris Bramble, Jon Churchill, Tony Ogogo, Madge Spencer. The Black Art Gallery, London. Obaala Publications 1990. Page 12.OCLC 24685261(https://worldcat.org/title/obaala-presents-the-potters-art-ceramics-by-chris-bramble-jon-churchill-tony-ogogo-madge-spencer/oclc/24685261)
  5. ^ Baugh-Jamaica's Master Potter. Selectco Publication (1968) Page-39.ISBN 0-9674991-0-0
  6. ^ Nottingham Evening Post 21st November 1968. Page 20.
  7. ^ Nottingham Evening Post 13th September 1973. Page 16.
  8. ^ Nottinghamshire Today. Volume 39 No.460. April 2003. Page-26
  9. ^ Kingston Gleaner 23rd October 1964. (https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1964-10-23/page-24)
  10. ^ Kingston Gleaner 2nd December 1965. Page 22.(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1965-12-02/page-22)
  11. ^ Kingston Gleaner 7th December 1966. Page 56.(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1966-12-07/page-56)
  12. ^ Kingston Gleaner 29th August 1967. Page-22.(https://gleaner.newapaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1967-08-29/page-22)
  13. ^ Local Artists' Exhibition Catalogue - 20th July to 18th August 1968.
  14. ^ Nottingham Evening Post. 21st November 1968. Page-20.
  15. ^ Nottingham Guardian Journal. 9th December 1969. Page-5
  16. ^ Kingston Gleaner 27th December 1969. Page-26.(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1969-12-27/page-26)
  17. ^ Nottingham Evening Post 16th December 1970. Page 17.
  18. ^ Nottingham Guardian Journal 23rd November 1971. Page 7.
  19. ^ Local Artists' Catalogue 1972.
  20. ^ Nottingham Evening Post 5th December 1972. Page 11
  21. ^ Ripley and Heanor News 14th September 1973. Page 9.
  22. ^ Derby Evening Telegraph 18th September 1973. Page 12.
  23. ^ Derby Evening Telegraph 19th May 1977. Page 5
  24. ^ Pottery Quarterly. Volume 13. No. 49. 1978. Page 23.
  25. ^ Kingston Gleaner 7th January 1979 Page-41(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1979-01-07/page-41)
  26. ^ New Horizons Exhibition Catalogue. GLC 1985. Page-21. Stuart Hall Library, London.(https://www.worldcat.org/title/obaala-presents-the-potters-art-ceramics-by-chris-bramble-jon-churchill-tony-ogogo-madge-spencer/oclc/24685261)
  27. ^ Kingston Gleaner 29th January 1986. Page-20.(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1986-01-29/page-20)
  28. ^ (https://new.diaspora-artists.net/display_item.php?id=2457&table=artists)
  29. ^ Nottinghamshire County Council receipts Nos: M389106 and M390460.
  30. ^ (https://www.worldcat.org/title/obaala-presents-the-potter-art-ceramics-by-chris-bramble-jon-churchill-jon-churchill-tony-ogogo-madge-spencer/oclc/24685261)
  31. ^ The Cecil Baugh Gallery of Ceramics. National Gallery of Jamaica. 26th June 1991. Page-8
  32. ^ Ripley and Heanor News 25 June 1993.
  33. ^ Lee Arbouin (2012) The Nottingham Connection. Page-97.ISBN 978-1-4685-8191-1
  34. ^ The Times 12 May 1993. Page-1.
  35. ^ Kingston Sunday Gleaner - The Arts. 21 August 2005. Page-72(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/2005-08-21/page-72)
  36. ^ Museum without Walls. 30th June 2017.(https://open-design.com/2017-06-30)
  37. ^ Kingston Gleaner 27th November 1965. Page-28.(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1965-11-27/page-28)
  38. ^ Pottery Quarterly. Volume 13. No 49. 1978. Page-23.
  39. ^ (https://www.worldcat.org/title/obaala-presents-the-potter-art-ceramics-by-chris-bramble-jon-churchill-jon-churchill-tony-ogogo-madge-spencer/oclc/24685261)
  40. ^ John Eggleston. Trentham Books.ISBN 1-85856-050-0
  41. ^ Andrina Louis. Nottinghamshire County Council - Leisure Services.ISBN 0-900943-93-9
  42. ^ ISBN 0-335-19901-1
  43. ^ Ceramics Art and Perception. Issue 63. (2006) Oswald G Harding.OCLC 840860608
  44. ^ Lee Arbouin (2012) Chapter on Madge Spencer. AuthorHouse.ISBN 978-1-4685-8191-1
  45. ^ Eddie Chambers. International Library of Visual Culture. IB Taurus July 2014.ISBN 978-1-78076-272-2
  46. ^ Daily Gleaner 26th August 1967. Page-18.(https://gleaner.newspaperarchive.com/kingston-gleaner/1967-08-26/page-18/)
  47. ^ Derbyshire Today 27th September 1985.
  48. ^ Lee Arbouin. The Nottingham Connection. Page 97
  49. ^ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMsgj5G17G8)
  50. ^ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_DjpQxLNEU)
  51. ^ (https://www.museumand.org)
  52. ^ Nottingham Post 27th July 2019. Page-27