Draft:Jorge Klor de Alva

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Jorge Klor de Alva
JJKdA.jpg
Born
Jose Jorge Klor de Alva

(1948-05-28) May 28, 1948 (age 71)
Mexico City, Mexico
OccupationPresident, Nexus Research and Policy Center

Dr. Jorge Klor de Alva[edit]

Dr. Jorge Klor de Alva is President of Nexus Research and Policy Center, an independent, non-profit research and policy advocacy organization whose goal is the improvement of colleges striving to educate nontraditional and underserved students.[1]}. He is also Chairman of 3DMX, Inc.[2], an innovative technology company headquartered in Silicon Valley that focuses, through its Mexico-based University of Advanced Technologies, on education and training programs in digital and advanced manufacturing technologies.

Among numerous advising roles, he has been a consultant to the Lumina Foundation’s degree productivity initiative[3], Educational Testing Service, Graduate Record Exam[4], College Board, New York State Department of Education, and the Smithsonian Institution[5]. He earned his B.A. and J.D. at University of California-Berkeley and a Ph.D. at University of California-Santa Cruz[6].

Career[edit]

Business[edit]

Earlier he worked on the establishment of the University of Phoenix (UOPX) as senior adviser to its Founder, John Sperling[7], and served as President of UOPX[8] and Senior Vice President and Board member of Apollo Group, Inc.[9], the holding company of UOPX. Dr. Klor de Alva worked on both Apollo Group’s 1994 IPO (NASDAQ-APOL) and its 2000 tracking stock IPO for UOPX Online. He retired from Apollo Group, Inc. in 2011[10].

Dr. Klor de Alva is also past Founder, Chairman and CEO of Apollo International, Inc., a global education company that served over 170,000 students in Europe, India and Latin America before its sale in 2005. As head of Apollo International, he also served as both Chairman and CEO of the Pitagoras-Apollo International joint venture in Brazil, which went public as KROTON in Brazil’s BOVESPA exchange[11].

J. Jorge Klor de Alva, J.D., Ph.D., Senior Vice President for Academic Excellence and Director, University of Phoenix National Research Center[12], re-joined University of Phoenix/Apollo Group in the Fall of 2005 as President of Latin American Operations and Sr. Vice President of International Operations, with the responsibility of leading the institution’s international expansion. Previously he was Chairman and CEO of Apollo International[13].

Apollo International was founded by Dr. Klor de Alva, when he was President of the University of Phoenix[14], as a global education company, focused on providing affordable, accredited education programs outside the U.S. At the time he sold the company in 2005 to re-join University of Phoenix, Apollo International had over 170,000 K-12 and higher education students, with operations in the Netherlands (U. of Phoenix), India (Western International University), Brazil (Faculdades Pitagoras, Rede Pitagoras), and Mexico (Grupo Educativo Apollo International). Pitagoras-Apollo International, the Brazilian division of Apollo International, later undertook an Initial Public Offering (IPO) in Brazil[15].

Until September 2000, Dr. Klor de Alva was President of the University of Phoenix[16]. He was a member of the boards of directors of Apollo Group and the University of Phoenix from 1991 to 2003. From 1971 to 2014 he worked with and advised Dr. John Sperling on the founding and development, first, of the Institute for Professional Development and, second, the University of Phoenix and Apollo Group (later renamed Apollo Education Group) [17]. During that time he worked on both the Apollo Group IPO and, later, the tracking stock for the University of Phoenix Online Division[18].

Professional Experience[edit]

  • 2011- President, Nexus Research and Policy Center[19]
  • 2007-2011 Senior Vice President, Academic Excellence, University of Phoenix; Director, UOP National Research Center[20]
  • 2005-2007 President, Latin America Operations, Apollo Group, Inc.[21]
  • 2000-2005 Chairman, President, CEO, Apollo International, Inc. Chairman of the Board, Pitagoras Apollo International, Ltda.[22][23]
  • 1998-2000 President, University of Phoenix[24]
  • 1998-2000 Senior Vice President, Apollo Group, Inc.[25]
  • 1996-98 Vice President, Business Development, Apollo Group, Inc.
  • 1994-98 The Class of 1940 Professor and Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley (UCB)[26]
  • 1989-94 Professor of Anthropology, Princeton University[27]
  • 1984-89 Director, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies (IMS), State University of New York-Albany (SUNY-A).
  • 1982-89 Associate Professor of Anthropology and Latin American Studies; Doctoral Program in Humanistic Studies; (SUNY-A).
  • 1980-82 Visiting Associate Professor of History, Merrill College, University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC).
  • 1978-81 Chairman, Department of Mexican American Graduate Studies, San Jose State University (SJSU).
  • 1975-80 Visiting Assistant Professor, Stevenson College; UCSC.
  • 1976-77 Visiting Research Associate, Instituto de Investígaciones Históricas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
  • 1971-82 Assistant and Associate Professor of Philosophy/Humanities/Mexican American Graduate Studies, San Jose State University.

Academic[edit]

Previously he was The Class of 1940 Professor at University of California-Berkeley[28], before then, professor at Princeton University[29]. He has been a Fulbright Scholar and John Simon Guggenheim Fellow[30]; a Harry Frank Guggenheim, National Endowment for the Humanities and National Science Foundation grantee; and a Getty Scholar, Getty Research Center[31].

Since 1994 he held the Class of 1940 Endowed Chair at the University of California, Berkeley[32] and before that he was Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University[33]. Previous academic positions were held at SUNY-Albany, University of California-Santa Cruz, and San Jose State University.

Besides receiving a number of grants for his research from the Spanish and Mexican governments, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and other funding agencies, he was a Fulbright Scholar, John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, Harry Frank Guggenheim grantee, and Getty Scholar at the Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities. Dr. Klor de Alva earned a B.A. in philosophy and a law degree (J.D.) from the University of California at Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in history/anthropology from the University of California at Santa Cruz[34].

His scholarly research interests have focused primarily on contemporary and early modern interethnic/interracial relations, education policy and curriculum reform, and cultural and social trends, primarily in North America, Europe, and Africa. Besides lecturing widely in these areas throughout Europe, Latin America, Africa, and the U.S., he has published over eighty scholarly articles, is co-author of nine social studies textbooks, and has authored, co-authored or edited another fifteen books on related subjects. His most recent books include In the Language of Kings (WW Norton: 2001)[35] and The Americans (McDougal Littell: 2007 [latest edition])[36].

Dr. Klor de Alva has over thirty five years of experience working in higher education, teacher preparation, and consulting for school districts, teachers’ groups, the Educational Testing Service, the GRE, and the College Board[37]. He has also served on accreditation teams for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and has been a consultant for the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education and the Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development. As a recognized student of educational and social trends, Dr. Klor de Alva was invited to serve on both the Commission on the Future of the Smithsonian Institution and the Commission on Long-Range Planning of the American Anthropological Association, in 2001 he was appointed to the Blue Ribbon Panel responsible for reviewing the present state and recommending changes for the Smithsonian’s Museum of American History[38].

He also worked for many years on the development of multicultural education. A frequent lecturer on the subject, he led numerous NEH-sponsored institutes for teachers and co-developed the Latino Heritage curriculum for the New York State Education Department (NYSED). In 1990-91 he was a member of NYSED’s Social Studies Syllabus Review and Development Committee and until 1996 served as co-chair of the NYSED Social Studies Curriculum and Assessment Committee appointed to develop and implement a new K-12 social studies curriculum for the state[39]. The committee’s final report established (at that time) the standards, assessment structure, and scope and sequence parameters for the state’s social studies curriculum.

Lectures at Universities and to Professional Organizations[edit]

Over 900 in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Central America, Africa, Europe, and East Asia.

Fieldwork and Archival/Library Research Experience[edit]

In the U.S. (S.W., M.W., and N.E.), Mexico (Michoacán, Nayarit, Tlaxcala, Mexico, Guerrero, Chiapas; D.F.), Puerto Rica (San Juan, Levittown, Mayagüez, Loíza Aldea), Central America (Guatemala, Honduras), Spain (Madrid, Trujillo), France (Paris), South Africa (Johannesburg, Cape Town), Ghana (Accra).

Public Service[edit]

An avid supporter of the humanities, Dr. Klor de Alva served as a lead curator for both the Spanish government’s Discoveries Pavilion at Expo ’92 in Seville and the Museo de America in Madrid. In addition, along with being the former Treasurer of the California Council for the Humanities and a member of the Smithsonian Institute Council[40], he was on the editorial board of Culturefront, the magazine of the New York Council for the Humanities, and was a member of the Cultural Committee of the Consulate General of Mexico in San Francisco and of the board of the American Association for Higher Education. He also served as a board member of the American Association of Higher Education and on the Advisory Council on Education and Human Resources of the National Science Foundation[41].

Professional Memberships and Scholarly Activities[edit]

1. Former Member of:

American Anthropological Association[42]; American Society for Ethnohistory; Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología; American Historical Association[43]; Latin American Indian Literatures Association[44]; Latin American Studies Association.

2. Member, Editorial Board of:

  • (1992-96) Culturefront (NY Council for the Humanities Review)
  • (1997-96) Hopsotch: A Cultural Review
  • (1994-99) American Anthropologist[45]
  • (1995-96) Journal of Latin American Anthropology
  • (1989-96) Estudios de Cultura Nahuatl (UNAM, Mexico)[46]
  • (1989-96) New Scholar
  • (1984-96) Latin American Indian Literatures Journal
  • (1989-92) Mesoamerican Studies Series, University of Utah Press
  • (1986-89) Studies on Culture and Society Series, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies, SUNY-A.
  • (1979-89) Campo Libre: Journal of Chicano Studies.
  • (1976-79) Escolios: Journal of Literature, Theory, and Critique.

Education[edit]

After graduating from Bellarmine College Preparatory, where he attended on a scholarship, he enrolled in the University of California, Berkeley, to study logic in the philosophy department. He earned his bachelor’s degree after working his way through school, first as a truck driver and later as the chair of the Third World Board, the entity established at Berkeley following the Third World Liberation Front movement that rocked the university in the 60’s and early 70’s. Upon graduation he began to study law at Berkeley at the same time he received an appointment in the philosophy department at San Jose State University. Once he earned his Juris Doctor degree he began teaching at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he earned an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in history and anthropology. Having taught himself Náhuatl, the language spoken by the Aztecs, his doctoral thesis, under the direction of Dr. Miguel León-Portilla, examined native resistance to Christianity in 16th century Mexico based primarily on the Náhuatl-language documents of the time.

  • Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz (Anthropology/History)[47]
  • J.D. University of California, Berkeley
  • B.A. University of California, Berkeley (Philosophy)

Personal Life[edit]

Childhood[edit]

J. Jorge Klor de Alva, was born May 28, 1948 in Mexico City. His parents were Maria de los Angeles de Alva, born in the state of San Luis Potosi, and Charles W. Klor, who emigrated with his family from Russia arriving in California in 1915. After WW II his father continued to Mexico, where he set up a scotch distilling and bottling operation until he ran into difficulties with the Mexican government. His father was forced to return to the U.S. when Klor de Alva was four years old. By 1957 Klor de Alva migrated to the U.S. with his mother and two siblings hoping to rejoin his father. Within a year after their arrival in San Jose, California, his father abandoned the family and Klor de Alva and his older brother began to work in the fields of the then still agricultural community. He continued working at part-time jobs during the school year, and full time in the summers, throughout his elementary and high school years.

Languages[edit]

Fluent English, Spanish, and Portuguese; semi-fluent French; good reading Italian and Catalan; adequate reading Latin; field/research language: Classical and modern Nahuatl (as spoken in Mexico).

Publications[edit]

He has published over 100 scholarly articles, is co-author of 9 social studies textbooks, and is author, co-author or editor of another 15 books in the social sciences—recent publications include Who Wins? Who Pays? The Economic Returns and Costs of a Bachelor’s Degree (2011)[48], Cheap for Whom? How Much Higher Education Costs Taxpayers (2011)[49], What’s the Value of an Associate’s Degree? The Return On Investment for Graduates and Taxpayers (2013)[50], Do Proprietary Higher Education Institutions Generate Savings for States? The Case of California, New York, Ohio and Texas (2014)[51], and Rich Schools, Poor Students: Tapping Large University Endowments to Improve Student Outcomes (2015)[52][53]—all available at www.nexusresearch.org–and The Americans (2015 [Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, latest edition])[54].

Books and Textbooks[edit]

  • 2007 (co-authored with Luis Wilson and Nancy Woloch) The Americans. McDougal Littell, Evanston, Illinois. (First ed. and Teacher’s Edition, First ed., 1998.)[55]
  • 2001 (co-edited with Earl Shorris and Miguel Leon-Portilla) The Language of Kings: An Anthology of Indigenous Mesoamerican Literatures. W. W. Norton, New York.[56]
  • 1999 (co-authored with Luis Wilson and Nancy Woloch)The Americans: Reconstruction Through the 20th Century. McDougal Littell, Evanston, Illinois. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1999.)[57]
  • 1995 (co-edited with Miguel León-Portilla, et al.) Tramas de la identidad: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. 4. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid.[58]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) I Know a Place. Houghton Mifflin Social Studies Series (HMSSS), Grade 1, rev. Houghton Mifflin Company (HMC), Boston. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[59]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) Some People I Know. HMSSS, Gr. 2, rev. HMC, Boston. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[60]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) From Sea to Shining Sea. HMSSS, Gr. 3, rev. HMC, Boston. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[61]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) This Is My Country. HMSSS, Gr. 4, rev. HMC, Boston. (And teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[62]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) America Will Be. Gr. 5, rev. HMC, Boston. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[63]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) To See a World. HMSSS, Gr. 6, rev. HMC, Boston. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[64]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) Across the Centuries. HMSSS, Gr. 7, rev. HMC, Boston. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[65]
  • 1994 (co-authored with Gary Nash and Luis Wilson) A More Perfect Union. HMSSS, Gr. 8, rev. HMC, Boston. (And Teacher’s Ed., 1994.)[66]
  • 1993 (co-edited with Miguel León-Portilla, et al.) La formación del otro: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. 3. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid.[67]
  • 1992 (co-edited with Miguel León-Portilla, et al.) Encuentros interétnicos: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. 2. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid.[68]
  • 1992 (co-edited with Miguel León-Portilla, et al.) Imágenes interétnicas: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. 1. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid.[69]
  • 1992 (edited, introduced and revised.) The Aztec Image of Self and Society: Introduction to Nahua Culture. Miguel León-Portilla. Edited with an introduction by J. J. Klor de Alva. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.[70]
  • 1988 (co-edited with H. B. Nicholson and Eloise Quiñones Keber) The Work of Bernardino de Sahagún: Pioneer Ethnographer of Sixteenth-Century Aztec Mexico. SUNY-A Institute for Mesoamerican Studies, Studies on Culture and Society. University of Texas Press, Austin.[71]
  • 1985 (co-edited with L. B. Brown and J. Oliver) Sociocultural and Service Issues in Working and Hispanic American Clients. Rockefeller College Press, Albany.[72]
  • 1976 Philosophy, Personality and Language: Mexicans and Mexican Americans. Spartan Books, San Jose, California.
  • 1974 Philosophy, Personality, and Chicanos. Marfel Series in Human Behavior and the Environment. Marfel Associates, Denver.
  • 1974 (Editor) Administration of Justice and the Spanish Speaking Community. Spartan Books, San Jose, California.
  • 1972 Introduction to Mexican Philosophy. Spartan Books, San Jose, California.

Books Translated[edit]

  • 1985 La Representación Política. (With Ricardo Montoro) Hanna Pitkin’s The Concept of Representation. Centro de Estudios Constitucionales, Madrid.[73]
  • 1983 Wittgenstein: El lenguaje, la política y la justicia. (Translation and introduction with Ricardo Montoro) Hanna Pitkin’s Wittgenstein and Justice. Centro de Estudios Constitucionales, Madrid.[74]

Scholarly Articles and Book Chapters[edit]

  • 2004 “In Conversation with Jorge Klor de Alva.” Forum (European Association for International Education Magazine 6 (No. 2, Summer): 12-14.
  • 2004 “Productivity Lessons from For-Profit Higher Ed.” Trusteeship Magazine (Jan-Feb).[75]
  • 2003 “Hora de decidir—Entrevista.” Ensino Superior 5 (No. 57, Junho): 20-24.
  • 2000 “Remaking the Academy: 21st-Century Challenges to Higher Education in the Age of Information.” Educause Review 35 (No. 2, March/April): 32-40. (The Clair Maple Memorial Address, August 9, 1999.)[76]
  • 1999-2000 “Remaking the Academy in the Age of Information.” Issues in Science and Technology 16 (No. 2): 52-58.[77]
  • 1999 “’Telling Lives’: Confessional Autobiography and the Reconstruction of the Nahua Self.” In Spiritual Encounters: Interactions Between Christianity and Native Religions in Colonial America. Nicholas Griffiths and Fernando Cervantes, eds. University of Birmingham, Birmingham, U.K.[78]
  • 1999 “Cipherspace: Latino Identity Past and Present.” In Race, Identity, and Citizenship. Rodolfo D. Tores, Louis F. Miron, and Jonathan Xavier Inda, eds. Blackwell Press, New York.
  • 1999 “Black-Brown Relations.” In The Cornel West Reader. Cornel West. Basic Civitas Books, New York (pp 499-513).[79]
  • 1998 “Borinquen, Aztlan, and Latino Cultural Nationalism.” In The Latino Studies Reader: Culture, Economy, and Society. Antonia Darder and Rodolfo Torres, eds. Blackwell Press, Malden, Mass.[80]
  • 1998 (with Henri Zerner) “The Idea of a Modern Museum.” Studies in Modern Art (No. 7): 98-108. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.[81]
  • 1997 “El derecho a la diferencia: límites y retos.” In Identidades étnicas: diálogos Amerindios. Manuel Gutiérrez Estévez, ed. Casa de América, Madrid.
  • 1997 (with Cornel West) “Black-Brown Relations: Are Alliances Possible?” Social Justice 24 (No. 2): 65-83.[82]
  • 1997 (with Cornel West) “Our Next Race Question: The Uneasiness Between Blacks and Latinos.” In Critical White Studies: Looking Behind the Mirror. Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic, eds. Temple University Press, Philadelphia.[83]
  • 1997 “Nahua Colonial Discourse and the Appropriation of the (European) Other.” In Borrowed Power: Essays on Cultural Appropriation. Bruce Ziff and Pratima V. Rao, eds. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick.[84]
  • 1997 The Invention of Ethnic Origins and the Negotiation of Latino Identity, 1969-1981.” In Challenging Fronteras: Structuring Latina and Latino Lives in the U.S. Mary Romero, Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, and Vilma Ortiz, eds. Routledge Press, New York.
  • 1996 “Mestizaje From New Spain to Aztlan: On the Control and Classification of Collective Identities.” In New World Orders: Casta Painting and Colonial Latin America. Elizabeth Ferrer and Ilona Katzew, eds. Americas Society, New York.
  • 1996 “Is Affirmative Action a Christian Heresy?” Representations (Summer): 59-73.
  • 1996 “Our Next Race Question: The Uneasiness Between Blacks and Latinos.” (Co-authored with Cornel West) Harper’s (April): 55-63.[85]
  • 1995 “Heteroglosia en el barrio: Cuando los nativos responden, las voces se multiplican.” In Tramas de la identidad: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. 4. J. J. Klor de Alva et al. Eds. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid.[86]
  • 1995 “The Post-Colonization of the (Latin) American Experience: A Reconsideration of “Colonialism,” “Postcolonialism,” and “Mestizaje.” In Gyan Prakash, ed. After Colonialism: Imperial Histories and Postcolonial Displacements. Princeton University Press, Princeton.[87]
  • 1994 “La voz nahua en el idioma colonial (Nueva España, siglo xvi).” In Julio Noriega, Eleodoro Febres, Jo Anne Englebert, eds. Encuentros con el Otro: Textos e Intertextos. Montclair State University Press, NJ.
  • 1994 “Commentary.” In Kwame Anthony Appiah, Identity Against Culture. Occasional Papers, 1. Doreen Townsend Humanities Center, UCB.[88]
  • 1993 “Sahagún y el origen de la antropología moderna: La colonización, confesión, e inscripción del otro.” In José María Muría, ed. La antigua y la nueva palabra: Nahuatlatos en Zapopan, Jalisco. El Colegio de Jalisco, Zapopan, Jal.[89]
  • 1993 “Aztec Spirituality and Nahuatized Christianity.” In South and Meso-American Native Spirituality. Gary H. Gossen and Miguel León-Portilla, eds. Vol. 4 of World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest. E. Cousins, gen. ed. Crossroad Pub. Co. NY.[90]
  • 1993 “La contienda por un nuevo Occidente: Política cultural y la pluralidad de la identidad al fin del siglo.” In La formación del otro: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. E. J. J. Klor de Alva et al. eds. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid.[91]
  • 1992 “Imagen del Japón en los primeros misioneros.” Cuadernos Americanos 36 (Noviembre-Diciembre): 31-45 (UNAM, Mexico).[92]
  • 1992 “Discussion and Conclusion.” In Hugh Thomas, The Real Discovery of America: Mexico, November 8, 1519. Moyer Bell Limited, London.[93]
  • 1992 “Indios y Criollos.” In John H. Elliott, ed. Europa/América 1492/1992. La Historia Revisada. Diario El País, S.A., Madrid. (Also Eng. Ed.)[94]
  • 1992 “Sin and Confession Among the Colonial Nahuas: The Confessional as a Tool for Domination.” In La ciudad, el campo, y la frontera en la historia de México. R.A. Sánchez Flores, E. Van Young, and G. von Wobeser, eds. Instituto de Investigaciones Históricas, UNAM, Mexico.[95]
  • 1992 “Raconter des Vies: L’atobiographie confessionnelle et la reconstruction de l’être nahua.” Archives des Sciences Sociales des Religions 77 (janvier-mars): 111-124 (CNRS, Paris).[96]
  • 1992 “Nahua Colonial Discourse and the Appropriation of the (European) Other.” Archives des Sciences Sociales des Religions 77 (janvier-mars): 15-35 (CNRS, Paris).[97]
  • 1992 “The Making and Remaking of the West: 1492 and 1992.” Culturefront 1:3-6.
  • 1992 “Colonialism and Postcolonialism as (Latin) American Mirages.” Colonial Latin America Review 1-2:3-23[98]
  • 1992 “On the Meaning of Broken Spears: Preface to the 1992 Edition.” In Miguel León-Portilla, ed. The Broken Spears: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico. Beacon Press, Boston[99].
  • 1992 “Nahua Studies, the Allure of the ‘Aztecs,’ and Miguel León-Portilla.” In M. León-Portilla, The Aztec Image of Self and Society: Introduction to Nahua Culture: Ed. with an intro., by J. J. Klor de Alva. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City[100].
  • 1992 “El discurso nahua y la apropiación de lo europeo.” In Imágenes interétnicas: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. 1. J. J. Klor de Alva et al. eds. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid[101].
  • 1992 “La Invención de los orígenes y la identidad latina en los Estados Unidos (1969-81).” In Encuentros interétnicos: De palabra y obra en el Nuevo Mundo. Vol. 2. J. Jorge Klor de Alva et al. Eds. Ediciones Siglo XXI, Madrid[102].
  • 1991 “The Hispanic World in the United States.” In The Hispanic World: Civilization and Empire, Europe and the Americas, Past and Present. John H. Elliott, ed. Thames and Hudson, London[103]. (Also Spanish ed.)
  • 1991 “Colonizing Souls: The Failure of the Indian Inquisition and the Rise of Penitential Discipline.” In Cultural Encounters: The Impact of the Inquisition in Spain and the New World. Mary Elizabeth Perry and Anne J. Cruz, eds. Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles[104].
  • 1991 “Religious Rationalization and the Conversion of the Nahuas: Some Reflections on Social Organization and Colonial Epistemology.” In To Change Place: Aztec Ceremonial Landscapes. David Carrasco, ed. University of Colorado Press, Boulder[105].
  • 1991 “Incomplete Conversion, ‘…a conspiracy of silence existed’: A Recent View.” In 1492: Discovery, Invasion, Encounter. Marvin Lunenfeld, ed. Sources in Modern History Series, D.C. Heath and Co., Lexington, MA and Toronto.
  • 1990 “La historicidad de los Coloquios de Sahagún.” In Bernardino de Sahagún. Diez estudios acerca de su obra. Ed. With an introduction by A. Hernández de León-Portilla. Fondo de Cultura Económica, Mexico[106].
  • 1990 “Chicana History and Historical Significance: Some Theoretical Considerations.” In Between Borders: Essays on Mexicana/Chicana History. Adelaida del Castillo, ed. Floricanto Press, Encino, California[107].
  • 1989 “European Spirit and Mesoamerican Matter: Sahagún and the Crisis of Representation in Sixteenth-Century Ethnography.” In The Imagination of Matter: Religion and Ecology in Mesoamerican Traditions. David Carrasco, ed. B.A.R. International Series 515, London[108].
  • 1989 “Aztlán, Borinquen, and Hispanic Nationalism in the U.S.” In Aztlán: Essays on the Chicano Homeland. Rudolfo Anaya and Francisco Lomeli, eds. El Norte Publications/Univ. of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque[109].
  • 1989 “Language, Politics, and Translation: Colonial Discourse and Classical Nahuatl in New Spain.” In The Art of Translation: Voices from the Field. Rosanna Warren, ed. Northeastern University Press, Boston[110].
  • 1988 “Ibero-American Experience (The Colonial Period: XV-XVIII Centuries.” In The Ibero-American Heritage Curriculum Project: Latinos in the Making of the United States: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow. Ed. By the New York State Education Department, Albany[111].
  • 1988 “Contar vidas: La autobiografía confesional y la reconstrucción del ser nahua.” Arbor 515-516:49-78 (journal of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid)[112].
  • 1988 “Sahaguntine Studies: Introduction, Problems, and Review” (with H. B. Nicholson and Eloise Quiñones Keber). In The Work of Bernardino de Sahagún: Pioneer Ethnographer of Sixteenth-Century Aztec Mexico. J. Jorge Klor de Alva, H. B. Nicholson, and Eloise Quiñones Keber, eds. IMS and University of Texas Press, Albany and Austin[113].
  • 1988 “Sahagún and the Birth of Modern Ethnography: Representing, Confessing, and Inscribing the Native Other.” In The Work of Bernardino de Sahagún: Pioneer Ethnographer of Sixteenth-Century Aztec Mexico[114].
  • 1988 “Sahagún’s Misguided Introduction to Ethnography and the Failure of the ‘Colloquios’ Project.” In The Work of Bernardino de Sahagún: Pioneer Ethnographer of Sixteenth-Century Aztec Mexico[115].
  • 1988 “Telling Hispanics Apart: Latino Sociocultural Diversity in the United States.” In The Hispanic Experience in the United States. E. Acosta-Belen and B. Sjostrom, eds. Praeger Publishers, New York[116].
  • 1987 “Martín Ocelotl: Dirigente del culto clandestino.” In Lucha por la supervivencia en la América colonial. Gary B. Nash and David G. Sweet, eds. David Huerta and Juan José Utrilla, translators. Fondo de Cultura Económica, Mexico, (Trans. and rev. of Struggle and Survival in Colonial America. University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1981.)
  • 1986 “California Chicano Literature and Pre-Columbian Motifs: Foil and Fetish.” Confluencia: Revista Hispanica de Cultura y Literatura 1:18-26[117]
  • 1985 “Chicano Philosophy.” In Chicano Literature: A Reference Guide. Julio A. Martinez and Francisco A. Lomeli, eds. Greenwood Press, Westport[118].
  • 1985 “Hispanic Cultures in the United States.” In Sociocultural and Service Issues in Working with Hispanic American Clients. John Oliver, Lester B. Brown, J. J. Klor de Alva, eds. Rockefeller College Press, Albany[119].
  • 1984 “Nahua Ethnoepistemology and Ethnometaphysics: Interpretation, Sources, and Some Revisionist Examples.” In Investigaciones recientes en el área maya. Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología, Mex[120].
  • 1983 “La imagen de los japoneses en el pensamiento de los misioneros: un estudio comparativo de sus efectos en los intentos proselitistas en Japón y la Nueva España.” Estudios de Asia y Africa 55:1-14 (journal of the Colegio de México, Mexico)[121].
  • 1983 “Gabino Barreda and Chicano Thought.” Aztlán: International Journal of Chicano Studies Research 14:343-358 (journal of UCLA)[122].
  • 1981 “La historicidad de los ‘Coloquios’ de Sahagún.” Estudios de Cultura Náhuatl 15:147-184) (journal of UNAM, Mexico)[123].
  • 1982 “Spiritual Conflict and Accommodation in New Spain: Toward a Typology of Aztec Responses to Christianity.” In The Inca and Aztec States, 1400-1800: Anthropology and History. George A. Collier, Renato I. Rosaldo, and John D. Wirth, eds. Academic Press, NY[124].
  • 1981 “Christianization and the Concept of Self: The Sixteenth-Century Aztec.” Campo Libre 1:25-33 (journal of California State University, L.A.).
  • 1981 “Martín Ocelotl: Clandestine Cult Leader.” In Struggle and Survival in Colonial America. Gary B. Nash and David G. Sweet, eds. University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles.
  • 1981 “Aztlán,” “La Malinche,” and “Cuauhtemoc.” In Dictionary of Mexican American History. Matt Meier and Feliciano Rivera, eds. Greenwood Press, Westport.
  • 1980 “The Aztec-Spanish Dialogues of 1524.” Alcheringa: Ethnopoetics 4:52-193 (journal of Boston University). Paleography, translation (Nahuatl-English), and study of Bernardino de Sahagún’s “Colloquios y doctrina christiana” manuscript of 1564.
  • 1979 “Christianity and the Aztecs.” San José Studies 5:6-21 (journal of San Jose State University)[125].
  • 1979 “Lenguaje y cristianización: La mente indígena y el vocabulario religioso.” In Los procesos de cambio en Mesoamérica y áreas circumvecinas. J. Litvak-King, ed. Sociedad Mexicana de Antropología, Mex[126].
  • 1977 “Critique of National Character Versus Universality in Chicana Poetry.” De Colores: Journal of Chicano Expression and Thought 3:20-24.
  • 1977 “Being, Solitude, and Susceptibility in Mexican Thought: From Adler to Marx in 35 Years.” Grito del Sol: Chicano Research Quarterly 2:39-67.
  • 1976 “A Commentary on Carlos Cosio’s ‘Losing and Wasting of Scholars in the Underdeveloped Countries.” In Equality and Freedom: International and Comparative Jurisprudence. 3 vols. Gray Dorsey, editor. A. W. Sitjthoff and Oceana Publications, Leiden and New York.
  • 1976 “Notes on the Teaching of Pre-Hispanic Mesoamerican Intellectual History.” The Politics of Culture 5:101-104.
  • 1974 “Toward a Philosophy of Bilingualism.” California Journal of Educational Research 25:310-313.
  • 1974 “The Hispanic Professional and Affirmative Action in Higher Education.” In Administration of Justice and the Spanish-Speaking Community. J. Jorge Klor de Alva, ed. Spartan Books, San Jose, California.
  • 1974 “The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and International Law.” In Administration of Justice and the Spanish Speaking Community. J. Jorge Klor de Alva, ed. Spartan Books, San Jose, California.

Reviews and Review Articles[edit]

  • 1992 Earl Shorris, Latinos: A Biography of the People. New York Times Book Review, Nov. 22[127].
  • 1992 Sabine MacCormack, Religion in the Andes: Vision and Imagination in Early Colonial Peru. New York Times Book Review, March 29[128].
  • 1990 S. Lyman Tyler, Two Worlds: The Indian Encounter with the European, 1492-1509 (Salt Lake City: University of Utah, 1988). In New Scholar: An Americanist Review 11:210-214[129].
  • 1989 Luis Nicolau D’Olwer, Fray Bernardino de Sahagún (1499-1590). Trans. by M.J. Mixco (Salt Lake City: University of Utah, 1987). In Ethnohistory 36:332-334[130].
  • 1989 Vicente L. Rafael, Contracting Colonialism: Translation and Christian Conversion in Tagalog Society under Early Spanish Rule (Ithaca: Cornell University, 1988). In American Anthropologist 91:264.
  • 1988 “ ‘La destrucción de las religiones andinas’ de Pierre Duviols.” Review essay. Anthropológica 6:441-448 (journal of the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima)[131].
  • 1988 J. Richard Andrews and Ross Hassig, translators and editors, Treatise on the Heathen Superstitions that Today Live Among the Indians Native to This New Spain, 1629 by Hernando Ruíz de Alarcón (Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1984). In American Ethnologist 15:172-173.
  • 1986 Rudolph van Zantwijk, The Aztec Arrangement: The Social History of Pre-Spanish Mexico (Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1985). In New Scholar: An Americanist Review 10:249-255.
  • 1984 Pierre Duviols, La destrucción de las religiones andinas (Mexico: UNAM, 1977). In Historica 8:247-256 (Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima, Peru)[132].
  • 1982-83 “Celso A. De Casas’ Pelon Drops Out. In La Palabra: Revista de Literatura Chicana 4-5: 171-174 (journal of Arizona State University)[133].

TV and Radio Scripts[edit]

  • 1987 Radio Program: “The Legend of the Sun”[134] and “A Confrontation of Mythologies.”[135] In “Stories from the Spirit World,”[136] produced by VOICES, NPR Jan. 1987. NPR CASSETES (PO Box 55417, Madison, WI 53705). The two one-hour scripts written 1982-1984, funded by NEH (6/82-9/84).
  • 1983-84 Television Program: “People of the Fifth Sun”[137] for “The ‘Fifth Sun’ Media Project” PBS Program (four one-hour television scripts), co-authored with P.T. Furst and J. L. Furst funded by NEH (3/83-12/84).

Scholarly and Professional Reports[edit]

  • 1996 (Co-author) Planning for the Future. Report of the Long-Range Planning Commission of the American Anthropological Association.
  • 1995 (Co-author with Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Stephen Jay Gould et al.) E Pluribus Unum: This Divine Paradox. Report of the Commission on the Future of the Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • 1995 (Co-author with Nathan Glazer, Linda Biemer et al.) Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Framework for Social Studies. New York State Education Department, Albany.
  • 1993 (Co-editor with Virgina Sanchéz Korrol et al.) Latinos in the Making of the United States of America: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. Ibero-American Heritage Curriculum Project, New York State Education Department, Albany[138].
  • 1991 (Co-author with César Alonso de los Ríos, et al.) Proyecto de Ejecución y Contenidos: Pabellón de los Descubrimientos. Vol. 1. Expo ’92, Seville, Spain.
  • 1991 (Co-author with Nathan Glazer, et al.) One Nation, Many Peoples: A Declaration of Cultural Interdependence. The Report of the New York State Social Studies Review and Development Committee. New York State Education Department, Albany.

Papers Presented at Professional Meetings[edit]

Over 500 in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Central America, Africa, Europe, and East Asia[139].

Curatorial Experience: Museums and Exhibitions[edit]

  • 1990-92 Member, Comisión Asesora (Coordinating Committee), Instituto de las Américas/Museo de América, Ministry of Culture, Madrid, Spain.
  • 1990-92 Head Curator: Exhibit on “Ciencias y Culturas: De Pané a Carlos III” (tentative title). Museo de América, Ministry of Culture, Madrid, Spain. Design and staging by Macua & García-Ramos, Madrid, Spain.
  • 1990-92 Head Curator: Exhibit on “La Mirada Europea y las Culturas Americanas: Siglo XVI.” Museo de América, Ministry of Culture, Madrid, Spain. Design and staging by Macua & García-Ramos, Madrid, Spain[140].
  • 1990-92 Head Curator: Exhibit on “Memoria e Invención: Mexicanos/Chicanos en los Estados Unidos.” Museo de América, Ministry of Culture, Madrid, Spain. Design and staging by Macua & García-Ramos, Madrid, Spain.
  • 1990-92 Member, Comité de Expertos, Pabellón de los Descubrimientos, Oficina del Comisario, Expo-92, Seville, Spain. (Coordinating Committee of the Pavilion of the Discoveries, Office of the Commissioner, Expo-92 World’s Fair.)
  • 1990-92 Head Curator: Exhibit on “Nuevos Hombres: De la Antropología a los Derechos Humanos.” Responsible for the anthropology/history section of building #1 of the Spanish government’s Pabellón de los Descubrimientos (“Pavillon of the Discoveries”) at Expo-92, Seville, Spain. Design by Creadores Asociados, S.A., Madrid, Spain. Staging by Confino-Duval, Nîmes, France.
  • 1974 Co-organizer, Mexican Museum. San Francisco, California.

Honors, Fellowships, and Grants[edit]

  • 1993-94 Getty Scholar, The Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities; Santa Monica, California[141].
  • 1993 Fellow of the American Anthropological Association, elected by the Executive Committee, American Anthropological Association.
  • 1992 Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship[142]
  • 1991-93 Comité Regional del V Centenario, Government of the Autonomous Community of Extremadura, Spain, grant ($175,000).
  • 1991 Comité Regional del V Centenario, Government of the Autonomous Community of Extremadua, Spain, grant ($14,000).
  • 1990-91 Ministry of Culture, Spain, grant for the establishment of the Museo de Las Americas and the organization/curation of its exhibits, under the direction of Dr. Manuel Guiterrez Estevez ($8,000,000).
  • 1990 Comité Conjunto Hispano-Norteamericano para la Cooperación Cultural y Educativa, Madrid, Spain, travel grant.
  • 1990 Comité Regional del V Centenario,Government of the Autonomous Community of Extremadura, Spain, grant ($14,000).
  • 1989 Comité Regional del V Centenario, Government of the Autonomous Community of Extremadura, Spain, grant ($12,000).
  • 1988 Comité Conjunto Hispano-Norteamericano para la Cooperación Cultural y Educativa, Madrid, Spain, travel grant.
  • 1988 Hearst Newspapers, Albany International, Norstar Bankcorp, City of Albany, and Lucius N. Littaauer Foundation grants ($26,500).
  • 1987 Wenner-Gren Foundation grant ($7,000).
  • 1987 National Science Foundation (BNS-8716015) research grant $10,000).
  • 1987-88 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship.
  • 1986-91 V Centenario del Descubrimiento de América, Comisión Nacional de España; Government of the Autonomous Community of Extremadura, Spain; Comité Conjunto Hispano-Norteamericano para la Cooperación Cultural y Educativa, Spain; V Centenario Comisión Nacional de México research, conference, and publication grants ($364,708).
  • 1985-86 Municipio of Malinalco, Mexico, grant (3,000).
  • 1984-85 New York State Department of Social Services grant ($50,000).
  • 1983-84 National Endowment for the Humanities, Media Projects, grant ($25,000).
  • 1982-84 National Endowment for the Humanities, Media Projects, grant ($18,000).
  • 1979 Bill Casey Memorial Award for the outstanding article in Volume 5 of San Jose Studies (“Christianity and the Aztecs”).
  • 1979 Finalist, Professor of the Year Award, San Jose State University.
  • 1978-79 Ford Foundation Research Fellowship.
  • 1976-77 Fulbright Research Fellowship.
  • 1975 Danforth Foundation Fellowship, Lilly Program in Philosophy, Stanford University.
  • 1973-74 Department of Health, Education, and Welfare grant ($250,000).
  • 1971-74 John Woodman Ayer Fellow-in-Law, Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley.
  • 1967 Phi Eta Sigma, National Honorary Society.
  • 1966-71 California State Scholarship, UCB.

Professional Consulting and Scholarly Memberships[edit]

  • 2001-02 Blue Ribbon Commission, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution (Appointed, unable to complete full term).
  • 1999- Board Member, American Association for Higher Education
  • 1999- Advisory Committee, Education and Human Resources, National Science Foundation
  • 1993-1999 Member, Smithsonian Institution Council.
  • 1993-96 Member, Commission on the Future of the Smithsonian Institution.
  • 1991- Member, Board of Directors, Apollo Group, Inc., Phoenix, Arizona.
  • 1991- Member, Board of Directors, University of Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona.
  • 1993-97 Member, Commission, Long-range Planning, American Anthropological Association.
  • 1995-96 Member, The College Board; History and Social Sciences Academic Advisory Committee.
  • 1993-97 Member, Commission on Minority Issues, American Anthropological Association.
  • 1992-96 Co-chair (with Nathan Glazer), Social Studies Curriculum Assessment and Evaluation Committee, New York State Department of Education.
  • 1991-96 Member, Executive Cultural Committee, Board of Directors, The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York, Consulate General of Mexico, New York.
  • 1990-91 Member, Social Studies Syllabus Review and Development Committee, New York State Department of Education.
  • 1990-95 Graduate Record Examinations Board, Minority Graduate Education Committee, Princeton, New Jersey.
  • 1990-93 SAT Verbal Review Panel, Educational Testing Service (ETS), Princeton.
  • 1989-92 “The Myth of the Five Suns.” NEH-funded film project.
  • 1989-92 ETS, Princeton, New Jersey. Analysis of differential item performance (effects of cultural bias) in GRE and SAT exams.
  • 1988-90 U.N.E.S.C.O., Paris, France. Consultant: cultural inventory plan. 1988-92 Comisión Nacional Quinto Centenario; Programa de Educación e Historia, Madrid, Spain.
  • 1986-92 New York State Education Department. Curriculum and Research Consultant, The Ibero-American Heritage Curriculum Project.
  • 1986-97 Greater Capital District Teacher Center, East Greenbush, NY.
  • 1986 New York State Education Department, Division of Teacher Certification.
  • 1986 New York State Department of Correctional Services, Division of Hispanic and Cultural Affairs.
  • 1983-89 Channel 13 and Excelsior newspaper, Mexico City, Mexico.
  • 1985-86 Capital District Humanities Program, SUNY-A.
  • 1985-86 Capital District Council for Social Studies and Division of Continuing Education, SUNY-A.
  • 1980-85 VOICES, producers of National Public Radio Program on the Myths of Ancient Mexico: Stories from the Spirit World, New York, N.Y.
  • 1984-85 School of Social Welfare, SUNY-A.
  • 1984 Capital District Humanities Program, SUNY-A.
  • 1983-84 WGBH, Boston, MA, “The Spider’s Web” Program.
  • 1981 University of Utah Hispanic Research Group.
  • 1979-80 Western Association of Schools and Colleges Accreditation Team.
  • 1977-79 Consultant to Secretary of State Cyrus Vance and the U.S. State Department (on Latin American affairs).
  • 1973-76 Consultant to the Office of the Santa Clara Superintendent of Schools, Juvenile Court School System, San Jose, California.
  • 1976 Consultant to Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development, Brentwood, California.
  • 1975 Berryessa Union School District, San Jose, California.
  • 1974 Western Interstate commission for Higher Education, Denver, Colorado.

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