International Association for Language Learning Technology

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The International Association for Language Learning Technology (IALLT) was founded in 1965 as the National Association of Language Lab Directors (NALLD), created as a not-for-profit professional association to help faculty and staff directing the first language labs to ensure their development as lab directors.[1]. As language lab directors became language center directors and language hub directors, NALLD changed into IALL (International Association for Learning Laboratories) in 1989 and then to IALLT in 1991.[2][3]. IALLT's membership is quite diverse, including faculty in languages and linguistics; language center directors, faculty, and staff; (U.S.) Title VI Language Resource Center directors, faculty, and staff; professionals in educational publishing; instructional technology staff; chief information officers; senior university administrators; and independent scholars, among others[4]. IALLT hosts a listserv (LLTI) for the exchange of information about language technology and language centers[5]

IALLT holds the IALLT Conference every other year at universities and in cities across North America and periodically cosponsors the International Conference on Foreign Language Education and Technology (FLEAT) with the Japan Association for Language Education and Technology (J-LET)[6][7]. IALLT also has an official presence at related conferences worldwide, as well as relationships with other organizations like ACTFL[8], CALICO[9], AsiaCALL[10], and EuroCALL[11]. Its official publication is the FLTMAG[12], which is a free online magazine on technology integration in language teaching and learning[13]. It maintains an archive of the now-defunct IALLT Journal, a peer-reviewed, scholarly, online-only journal[3], as well as book-length publications in areas relating to language learning technology and language centers. Its newest publication is “The Language Handbook”[14], which updates two earlier publications and includes new chapters.

IALLT is an organization of volunteers with no paid Executive Director[2]. It is governed by a Board of Directors (President, President-Elect, Secretary, Treasurer, and Programs Director), as well as a Council composed of around 36 members, including the immediate Past President, regional presidents, and members affiliated with related groups and entities[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lavolette, Elizabeth; Simon, Edwige (2018). Language center handbook. Auburn, Alabama: International Association for Language Learning Technology. p. 384. ISBN 9781946123022.
  2. ^ a b Kronenberg, Felix (2017). From language lab to language center and beyond : the past, present, and future of language center design. Auburn, Ala.: International Association for Language Learning Technology. p. 172. ISBN 9781946123008. OCLC 1003644344.
  3. ^ a b "About the Journal | IALLT Journal of Language Learning Technologies". journal.iallt.org. Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  4. ^ Lavolette, Elizabeth; Simon, Edwige (2018). Language center handbook. Auburn, AL: International Association for Language Learning Technology. pp. xii. ISBN 9781946123008.
  5. ^ Kronenberg, Felix (2017). From language lab to language center and beyond : the past, present, and future of language center design. Auburn, Ala.: International Association for Language Learning Technology. p. 9. ISBN 9781946123008. OCLC 1003644344.
  6. ^ Kronenberg, Felix (2017). From language lab to language center and beyond : the past, present, and future of language center design. Auburn, Ala.: International Association for Language Learning Technology. p. 173. ISBN 9781946123008. OCLC 1003644344.
  7. ^ "FLEAT 6 Conference Report". The FLTMAG. 2015-09-14. Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  8. ^ "ACTFL Professional Awards | American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages". www.actfl.org. Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  9. ^ "Sister Organizations & Journals". Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  10. ^ "History - AsiaCALL". ljunction.com. Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  11. ^ "EUROCALL". www.eurocall-languages.org. Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  12. ^ "IALLT Journal of Language Learning Technologies". journal.iallt.org. Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  13. ^ "About the FLTMAG". The FLTMAG. Retrieved 2019-03-09.
  14. ^ Language center handbook. Lavolette, Elizabeth,, Simon, Edwige F.,. Auburn, Alabama. ISBN 1946123021. OCLC 1053983153.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link) CS1 maint: others (link)
  15. ^ "Board and Council". iallt.org. Retrieved 2019-03-09.

External links[edit]